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Old May 20th, 2006, 07:01 PM   #1
Elscire
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Default Processing Speed.

does anyone know how to crank up your processing speeds? at Barnes and Noble i was reading about processors until i came up with a one page about how to turn up your processor and graphics card. but as i was reading it my brother said we had to leave and i'm broke this month so i couldn't get it. i know it makes more heat when cranked up but i kinda want to crank it up so it'll go a bit faster than the product says.
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Old May 20th, 2006, 07:22 PM   #2
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

It's possible you can overclock your computer, depending on which motherboard, processor, BIOS, and graphics cards you have.
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Old May 20th, 2006, 07:27 PM   #3
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

umm can you tell me how to though? right now i'm running on 2.19 gigahertz per second. i want it to go to 2.5
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Old May 20th, 2006, 07:28 PM   #4
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

Sorry but I can't, unless you tell me all the specs of your computer. Even then it may not be possible!
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Old May 20th, 2006, 08:57 PM   #5
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

Honestly, you can't just go from 2.16GHz to 2.5GHz just because you want - otherwise, new processors wouldn't sell at all, everyone would just make their processor's speed increase. Overclocking is always available, however, it's a very delicate process that can seriously destroy a computer if it's not done correctly. To make it worse, overclocking is completely different for different processors and devices. There are also processor-specific programs for overclocking, so if you get an incompatible one, you also might mess something up.

Now, here's the thing; going from 2.2GHz to 2.5GHz would make so little difference to a human that it's almost not worth the effort. Only if you need to get every last bit of performance out of your computer should you look into overclocking.

Though let's all cheer in joy! This has inspired me to create an overclocking guide! Unfortunately, I still have my Avant Browser Guide to finish up, as well as another projekt - then I may come to this one. (sorry if you were hoping of a soon release )

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Old May 21st, 2006, 04:21 AM   #6
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

As said before, overclocking depends on your hardware. Plus you may need a decent cooling system as your PC may overheat. Just recently they have Overclocked a PC to 7.019ghz and it was cooled by liquid nitrogen..
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Old May 21st, 2006, 12:25 PM   #7
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

i got a radiator and 2 giant fans. not to mean my room is quite cold because i like to turn up the A.C.
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Old May 21st, 2006, 03:45 PM   #8
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

overclocking was worth it several years ago when it made 5 - 10 seconds difference, now the difference between 2.2GHz and 2.5GHz is not noticeable at all, its a few hundredths of a second difference
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Old May 21st, 2006, 03:58 PM   #9
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

speederxp .... messing arround in cmos and uhh ctrl alt delete and rightlicking the app u want to have more power to and setting priority to high or abovenormal will get it up there too running smoother

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Old May 21st, 2006, 04:55 PM   #10
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

A radiator and two giant fans won't do you any good - you see, your computer needs quite a lot of fans if you even wish to overclock past 2% of the processor's speed. Here's what the fan setup should be:

At the very least, one fan in the front (though preferably 2) at the size of at least 80mm; at the very least, two fans in the back the size of 80mm or one fan the size of 120mm. This is crucial: whatever the setup, there must be a low air pressure in the casing, meaning there must be more air being forced out than air being forced in. If you have two fans in the front running at a higher speed than the two fans in the back, your case will have a high pressure and that will cause over heating. The CPU fan must be extremely good (not talking a cheap $20 - more like in the range of $40-$50) and you must apply the right amount of thermal compound.

That's just a small bit of it... though if you don't have all of that done, then theirs no way you can get past 2.25GHz without overheating.

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Old May 21st, 2006, 04:59 PM   #11
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

Speederxp overclocks you btw forgot to mention it sooo dont think you can hit up your pc @ 1000% and not let your toes get a little warm. Screws you up hardcore if you never used it before... everything goes really fast but yet really slow (hard to explain)

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Old May 23rd, 2006, 08:04 AM   #12
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

If you need any help with that OC guide kiros you can ask me, ive been around and around with this A64 OC'ing it.

Anyway, when you say have a low pressure in the case, if the air is flowing pretty good then a higher pressure would be better as the air would conduct heat better. But ya, exhaust > intake.

NEVER use and windows app to OC. Always use the bios. I tried using clockgen and when it hit unstable and locked up it gave some errors on startup that normaly wouldnt be there on an unstable boot.

Im assuming you have an older P4? With P4 when you overclock you want a higher clock speed with RAM also, even if it means a higher latency. The opposite is with the A64, your better off with lower latency than clock speed.

Download a program called SpeedFan and Prime95. Run the P95 torture test with small FFT's and tell us the processor temp using SpeedFan. P95 torture test will be the way you tell if your overclock is rock stable.

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Old May 23rd, 2006, 10:13 PM   #13
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Arrow Re: Processing Speed.

OK, Cory, I'm going to have to call you wrong as far as air pressure. I've been trained to know most things about common hardware and operating system functionality. I'm no more than a month away from becoming a certified computer technician. I know for a fact that it is extremely bad to have any high pressure air flow in a case. It do not matter if the air is cool or not, and just because there is more air does in no way mean cooling would be better. The problem with high pressure is that it leaves pockets of air just sitting there, not moving at all. This causes heat to build. If there is a low pressure, then all the air in the case is going to come out - that's how cases are built. The advantage to this is that cool air will also be pulled in from the outside (with or without the help of fans - however it is much better to have fans). This is why "exhaust > intake" as you put it. This "exhaust" from the computer is not more important because it takes out heated air; it's more important just because it takes out air - this is why every computer case at the very least (overclocking or not) needs an fan to push out the air. The "intake" is lesser mostly because it's more about circulation than it is about cool air in and warm air out. Anyway, the point is that you should always have a low pressure in the case (not a major low pressure, just more air taken out than is being put in).

Now then, I'm afraid I'm going to have to disagree with your methods, Cory, as for using firstly and strictly the BIOS (rather, the CMOS Setup) to overclock. This is extremely dangerous. In all sense, it's much better to use software to setup an overclocked computer than the CMOS Setup. Software allows you to diagnose problems and potential problems a great deal. Software also allows for the system to boot before the overclocking takes affect. Now, just for instance, if you overclocked with the CMOS Setup to make your Intel go from 2.19GHz to 2.5GHz, several things could/would happen upon saving the settings and rebooting: nothing would appear on the screen, the computer would not respond to anything except pulling the plug, the computer would give a constant (or, if possible, a successive) beep, after so long with the computer turned on, the CPU of the processor would actually begin to fuse it's physical switches, if the FSB was also configured to go along with this, the motherboard's north bridge would begin to overheat and soon start fusing it's own switches, and finally, you would not be able to get back into the CMOS Setup to correct your mistake. This is quite a nasty predicament, right? The only way(s) you could correct this problem is by taking out the motherboard battery, waiting ten (10) seconds, and putting it back in without touching anything else on the motherboard, and if your motherboard has a jumper to reset the CMOS configurations, and your can find it, then you could also reset it by putting a spare shunt on the jumper correctly for about five (5) seconds and then removing it without, of course, touching anything else on the motherboard. Either way, if you do this, then you will have to go back into the CMOS Setup, correct the time, and restore any and all non-default settings (customizations). This was just an overall nasty scenario, wasn't it? Just because you want that extra 0.31GHz... Now, for the sake of my sanity and for those reading this incredibly long explanation, I'm going to put a smiley after this sentence and then explain what would happen with software! Hmmm... What if you did this with software? If you used a compatible software to overclock your computer's processor and FSB, and you overclocked from the same (2.19GHz) to the same (2.5GHz), then the following could/would happen upon confirming and applying the change: depending on the video card and processor, the screen might freeze entirely (including the mouse), or (if the OS is a newer version of Windows) the infamous Blue Screen of Death would come up and the computer would reboot, or (if the OS is anything other Windows with a somewhat good diagnostics kernel) the environment would change to a simple text-based error display and the computer would reboot. Upon reboot, you would be lectured by the computer's active OS, stating a summary of what it knows happened and possibly giving an option to see the technical errors (in memory and I/O calls). If the overclocking software was set to auto-start (which, by the way, you shouldn't ever do the first time) then it might want to overclock it again (if it saved it in a file/registry key) to the same level, which would potentially create the exact same thing happen. However, there is quite an easy fix for this on Windows systems, which is just simply booting in Safe Mode and removing the startup entry. On any other OS, there should be a similar mode, whereby only completely needed services are started - this will also allow you to remove the startup entry. Now, was this as awful as configuring it through the CMOS Setup? Think about it The only time I, myself, would ever actually overclock through the CMOS Setup is when I completely know that my system will boot and will be completely stable at the speed I want to configure it for. Don't get me wrong, configuring through the CMOS has it's advantages, but it's not worth it, especially if you're a novice overclocker or if you do not know how your system will act. In fact, in some instances with overclocking RAM or the FSB, the computer will boot, but the OS will not load. This is, again, another advantage of using software to overclock your computer.

Now, about the overclocking guide... I might call upon you if (or Advent) if I'm majorly busy, however, for the sake of consistent, correct, and non-redundant data, I will try to personally manage that guide.

I'm not trying to intentionally go at you, Cory, however, I need you and everyone else learn before anyone makes a mistake they might regret. Though, if you don't like what I'm saying, you're always free to disapprove this post and lower my reputation...

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Old May 24th, 2006, 03:57 PM   #14
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

I will have to disagree with you kiros. When i used clockgen i upped it till the computer locked up and upon rebooting i still had to reset the CMOS and go through everything. Also, using the CMOS can save you from a screwed up OS from not shutting down properly. Another reason its better to use CMOS is the options it gives you. Clockgen gave me no options except to raise FSB and vcore. While im in the CMOS however i can adjust memory timings and many other things to perfection. As for the OS telling you what happened, with my specific motherboard, and probably many others, if i try to boot an unstable OC then it will tell me and automaticaly reset the CMOS is i have it set to.

You will probably need to make multiple guides anywaybecause P4 and Athlon XP/64 OC'ing have numerous differences.

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Old May 24th, 2006, 09:05 PM   #15
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

No, I'll just make different sections in the one guide for processor/board specific issues.

Now, if you used a software to configure your CMOS, then it's just the same as setting it in CMOS - by the way, this is flashing your BIOS ROM, not overclocking through software. A pure software overclock does in no way touch the ROM. Also, since it's configured while the operating system can monitor changes, overclocking incorrectly is much less dangerous. Most programs are somewhat different, so this Clockgen you used might not have been the greatest choice. Fault of the user if one chooses incompatible software or blank programs... However, another great part of software is that it's constantly being tested, added on to, and revised, so updating will always let you get the best out of that program - another good point is that updating software is much safer and easier than updating the BIOS ROM. In fact, in many cases, the CMOS Setup gives fewer options than software. Again, many operating systems cannot boot at higher clock speeds (or customized ones) even if the computer can start up and get past POST. Speaking about POST, it can detect if a certain device fails from a unique overclock, meaning, if you configure the FSB to maintain speed with the processor, then it won't bother to check anything but the regular POST operations (ie: power good, the crystal clock on the board, keyboard, memory). If you have a custom AGP or PCI-Express configuration, then it will do self checks on those as well (if it's a modern ATX or BTX motherboard).

Coming from a technician, software overclocking are definitely easier, safer, and can be more affective. However, it's completely up to the owner of the computer

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Old May 25th, 2006, 09:16 AM   #16
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

Unless you're processor is seriously, seriously slow (like a Pentium Pro or something) I wouldn't reccomend overclocking. There's just no point to it. If you have the money, buy a new one. That way you won't find that your CPUs burned out.

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Old May 25th, 2006, 11:13 AM   #17
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasabian
Unless you're processor is seriously, seriously slow (like a Pentium Pro or something) I wouldn't reccomend overclocking. There's just no point to it. If you have the money, buy a new one. That way you won't find that your CPUs burned out.
I argree, when processors were like 133mhz overclocking would shave off 5-10 seconds on loading time
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Old May 25th, 2006, 02:19 PM   #18
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Default Re: Processing Speed.

Ya i have a 3 ghz processer so i se no need to overclock.


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