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View Full Version : ADD/ADHD aren't facking diseases.


CantLiveWithoutYou
March 21st, 2011, 04:39 PM
deleted because some retard bumped it

randy.boii
March 21st, 2011, 04:40 PM
i have add n im on concertaaa

CantLiveWithoutYou
March 21st, 2011, 04:42 PM
^ Exactly, it's an excuse for psychiatrists to get more money and to prescribe things so they get even more money on top of what you're already paying them to keep your kid going to them because they tell gullible parents it's a disease.

randy.boii
March 21st, 2011, 04:44 PM
the meds help me focusss and my grades went from 60s to 80s

Malcolm Tucker
March 21st, 2011, 05:04 PM
It's not a motherfucking disorder or disease, it's a normal part of being a goddamn child.

Yes it is. It's not a normal part of being a child. I never presented any symptoms worth of being considered being ADHD/ADD/etc, so how exactly is it normal if - as you state - it only affects 20% of adolescents?

I 'have it' and I can make myself go from flying around the room running up the walls to perfect A student in a week,

That just shows you're somewhat intelligent, and can apply yourself. I've done that too. Yet, I've never been considered ADHD, and I've been to a psychiatrist.

it's a normal part of being a fucking kid

See point #1, above.

I mean seriously, you think all those kids have something else the other kids don't? It's just like people with black hair, some are blacker and some are almost brown. Odd euphemism, yes, but it's just that some kids are a little less of a buzzkill and like having more fun.

So people who aren't considered ADHD/ADD/etc. are a "buzzkill"? Are we just social prudes in your eyes?

Sorry if this fits better in the white padded room. Feel free to move it mods. Thought the ADD section would get a bit more attention though.

No, it's placed correctly here. It'd get more views in The White Padded Room, though.

- - -

Also, watch your language. I get you're "frustrated" or whatever, but there's no need.

the wasabi
March 22nd, 2011, 01:48 AM
Yes it is. It's not a normal part of being a child. I never presented any symptoms worth of being considered being ADHD/ADD/etc, so how exactly is it normal if - as you state - it only affects 20% of adolescents?



That just shows you're somewhat intelligent, and can apply yourself. I've done that too. Yet, I've never been considered ADHD, and I've been to a psychiatrist.



See point #1, above.



So people who aren't considered ADHD/ADD/etc. are a "buzzkill"? Are we just social prudes in your eyes?



No, it's placed correctly here. It'd get more views in The White Padded Room, though.

- - -

Also, watch your language. I get you're "frustrated" or whatever, but there's no need.


this guy is my new hero.

Bmilli
March 22nd, 2011, 02:57 AM
i have add and adhd. medication helps! [email protected][email protected]!#[email protected]#[email protected]#[email protected]#[email protected]#[email protected]#!

CantLiveWithoutYou
March 22nd, 2011, 07:10 PM
NO FUCKING SHIT MEDICATION HELPS. Medication doesn't make you 'normal', it changes you, just like weed, it makes you pretty far from 'normal'. Just because these medications change your behavior doesn't mean they make you 'normal'.

the wasabi
March 23rd, 2011, 03:03 AM
uhhh....if something requires medication, then how is it not a disease....
it's not like it's a daily supplement or vitamins or something.

Syvelocin
March 23rd, 2011, 03:38 AM
I won't argue over this too much as Michael pretty much nailed it, but why is ADD/ADHD in every DSM and ICD if it's not a disease? Well, I hate that word, disease. Let me use disorder instead. Approximately 15 million Americans have clinical depression, does it make that normal to feel worthless, have no motivation to do anything, even have suicidal thoughts? No, it's still a disorder.

Medication helps, it doesn't make you normal. You'd be more normal on medication than with a disorder like that. No offence or anything. I have a friend with ADHD, and when he doesn't take his meds, well, I'm sorry, but that's not normal behaviour.

Spook
March 23rd, 2011, 10:11 AM
I really don't know about that. My brother and sister both had ADHD, and they were almost completely out of touch with reality. I mean, my sister...I don't wanna talk about it. Anyways, they dropped out of school with F's because of it. It is kinda...insulting when you say it is a normal part of being a kid, because if you told that to them I am sure they would give a lot to be "normal." :(

CaptainObvious
March 23rd, 2011, 10:27 AM
I won't argue over this too much as Michael pretty much nailed it, but why is ADD/ADHD in every DSM and ICD if it's not a disease? Well, I hate that word, disease. Let me use disorder instead. Approximately 15 million Americans have clinical depression, does it make that normal to feel worthless, have no motivation to do anything, even have suicidal thoughts? No, it's still a disorder.

Medication helps, it doesn't make you normal. You'd be more normal on medication than with a disorder like that. No offence or anything. I have a friend with ADHD, and when he doesn't take his meds, well, I'm sorry, but that's not normal behaviour.

This is the problem with mental health. The point of view that "it's not a disease, merely a difference in functioning" is not actually something you can argue with, because he's using the exact same logic as you are to come to a different conclusion.

More importantly, he gets one thing right:

NO FUCKING SHIT MEDICATION HELPS. Medication doesn't make you 'normal', it changes you, just like weed, it makes you pretty far from 'normal'. Just because these medications change your behavior doesn't mean they make you 'normal'.

I don't have ADD. That said, I have used ADD meds at many times in the past. It makes me a far, far more efficient and more persistent worker. ADD drugs should do that for just about everyone. That is part of why I have a serious problem with the line of argument "ADD meds helped me, therefore I have ADD." Well then yeah, I have ADD, pretty much everyone I've ever known who has ever taken an ADD medication to help with studying has ADD, and the whole population might as well just be on amphetamines. But clearly that's not true.

So while I'm not going to subscribe to the OP's argument, the idea that there is overdiagnosis of ADD and/or that the criteria for the disease merely represent a difference of function rather than a detriment to be corrected, could certainly be valid.

Syvelocin
March 23rd, 2011, 08:47 PM
ADD/ADHD, like other mental illnesses can be a neurological problem, if, like you said, it's diagnosed correctly. It can also be inherited as well, pointing more to a disorder than a "difference in functioning" alone. A lot of the issue is in parts of the brain that control the functioning. I have to agree, it is overdiagnosed. Just like every single main mental disorder. Kids are being diagnosed with anything and everything earlier and earlier with less and less studying. Misdiagnosis is bound to happen.

Dimitri
March 23rd, 2011, 09:27 PM
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001551.htm
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/images/nd_print_version.pnghttp://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/images/nd_email.png (http://virtualteen.org/cgi/medlineplus/email_request.pl?refPage=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001551.htm&emailTitle=Attention+deficit+hyperactivity+disorder+%28ADHD%29)http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/images/addthis_icon.gif (http://www.addthis.com/bookmark.php?v=250&username=medlineplus&ui_508_compliant=true&ui_language=en)
ADHD is a problem with inattentiveness, over-activity, impulsivity, or a combination. For these problems to be diagnosed as ADHD, they must be out of the normal range for a child's age and development.

Causes

Imaging studies suggest that the brains of children with ADHD are different from those of other children. These children handle neurotransmitters (including dopamine, serotonin, and adrenaline) differently from their peers.
ADHD may run in families, but it is not clear exactly what causes it. Whatever the cause may be, it seems to be set in motion early in life as the brain is developing.
Depression (http://ie.surfcanyon.com/search?f=sl&q=Depression&partner=wtiieusi), lack of sleep, learning disabilities, tic disorders, and behavior problems may be confused with, or appear with, ADHD. Every child suspected of having ADHD should have a careful evaluation to determine what is contributing to the behaviors that are causing concern.
ADHD is the most commonly diagnosed behavioral disorder of childhood. It affects about 3 - 5% of school aged children. ADHD is diagnosed much more often in boys than in girls.
Most children with ADHD also have at least one other developmental or behavioral problem. They may also have another psychiatric problem, such as depression or bipolar disorder (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000926.htm).
Symptoms

The symptoms of ADHD are divided into inattentiveness, and hyperactivity and impulsivity.
Some children with ADHD primarily have the inattentive type, some the hyperactive-impulsive type, and some the combined type. Those with the inattentive type are less disruptive and are more likely to miss being diagnosed with ADHD.
Inattention symptoms:

Fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork
Has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play
Does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
Does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace
Has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
Avoids or dislikes tasks that require sustained mental effort (such as schoolwork)
Often loses toys, assignments, pencils, books, or tools needed for tasks or activities
Is easily distracted
Is often forgetful in daily activities
Hyperactivity symptoms:

Fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat
Leaves seat when remaining seated is expected
Runs about or climbs in inappropriate situations
Has difficulty playing quietly
Is often "on the go," acts as if "driven by a motor," talks excessively
Impulsivity symptoms:

Blurts out answers before questions have been completed
Has difficulty awaiting turn
Interrupts or intrudes on others (butts into conversations or games (http://ie.surfcanyon.com/search?f=sl&q=games&partner=wtiieusi))
Exams and Tests

Too often, difficult children are incorrectly labeled with ADHD. On the other hand, many children who do have ADHD remain undiagnosed. In either case, related learning disabilities or mood problems are often missed. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued guidelines to bring more clarity to this issue.
The diagnosis is based on very specific symptoms, which must be present in more than one setting.

Children should have at least 6 attention symptoms or 6 hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms, with some symptoms present before age 7.
The symptoms must be present for at least 6 months, seen in two or more settings, and not caused by another problem.
The symptoms must be severe enough to cause significant difficulties in many settings, including home, school, and in relationships with peers.
In older children, ADHD is in partial remission when they still have symptoms but no longer meet the full definition of the disorder.
The child should have an evaluation by a doctor if ADHD is suspected. Evaluation may include:

Parent and teacher questionnaires (for example, Connors, Burks)
Psychological evaluation of the child AND family, including IQ testing (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001912.htm) and psychological testing
Complete developmental, mental, nutritional, physical, and psychosocial examination
Treatment

The American Academy of Pediatrics has guidelines for treating ADHD:

Set specific, appropriate target goals to guide therapy.
Start medication and behavior therapy.
When treatment has not met the target goals, re-evaluate the original diagnosis, the possible presence of other conditions, and how well the treatment plan has been implemented.
Follow-up regularly with the doctor to check on goals, results, and any side effects of medications. During these check-ups, information should be gathered from parents, teachers, and the child.
MEDICATIONS
Children who receive both behavioral treatment and medication often do the best. There are now several different classes of ADHD medications that may be used alone or in combination. Psychostimulants (also known as stimulants) are the most commonly used ADHD drgus. Although these drugs are called stimulants, they actually have a calming effect on people with ADHD.
These drugs include:

Amphetamine-dextroamphetamine (Adderall)
Dexmethylphenidate (Focalin)
Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine, Dextrostat)
Lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse)
Methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta, Metadate, Daytrana)
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the nonstimulant drug atomoxetine (Strattera) for use in ADHD. It may be as effective as stimulants, and may be less likely to be misused.
Some ADHD medicines have been linked to rare sudden death in children with heart problems. Talk to your doctor about which drug is best for your child.
BEHAVIOR THERAPY
Both before and after a child is diagnosed, there is stress on the family. Families can experience blame, anger, and frustration. Talk therapy for both the child and family can help everyone overcome these feelings and move forward.
Parents should use a system of rewards and consequences to help guide their child's behavior. It is important to learn to handle disruptive behaviors. Support groups can help you connect with others who have similar problems.
Other tips to help your child with ADHD include:

Communicate regularly with the child's teacher.
Keep a consistent daily schedule, including regular times for homework, meals, and outdoor activities. Make changes to the schedule in advance and not at the last moment.
Limit distractions in the child's environment.
Make sure the child gets a healthy, varied diet, with plenty of fiber and basic nutrients.
Make sure the child gets enough sleep.
Praise and reward good behavior.
Provide clear and consistent rules for the child.
ADHD can be a frustrating problem. Alternative remedies have become popular, including herbs, supplements, and chiropractic manipulation. However, there is little or no solid evidence for many remedies marketed to parents.
Outlook (Prognosis)

ADHD is a long-term, chronic condition. If it is not treated appropriately, ADHD may lead to:

Drug and alcohol abuse
Failure in school
Problems keeping a job
Trouble with the law
About half of children with ADHD will continue to have troublesome symptoms of inattention or impulsivity as adults. However, adults are often more capable of controlling behavior and masking difficulties.
When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your doctor if you or your child's school personnel suspect ADHD. You should also tell your doctor about any:

Difficulties at home, school, and in relationships with peers
Medication side effects
Signs of depression

Prevention

Although there is no proven way to prevent ADHD, early identification and treatment can prevent many of the problems associated with ADHD.
Alternative Names

ADD; ADHD; Childhood hyperkinesis
References

Pliszka S; AACAP Work Group on Quality Issues. Practice parameter for the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2007 Jul;46(7):894-921.
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml). Accessed January 14, 2010.
Prince JB, Spencer TJ, Wilens TE, Biederman J. Pharmacotherapy of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder across the life span. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum JF, Fava M, Biederman J, Rauch SL, eds. Massachusetts General Hospital Comprehensive Clinical Psychiatry. 1st ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2008:chap 49.

If this doesn't prove that ADHD/ADD is a disorder and not a disease I don't know what else to do, evidently the physicians are willing to put their reputations on the line to support their findings.

justmehere
March 23rd, 2011, 10:28 PM
my little brother has ADHD. he acts just like any other kid except he can't focus or sit still. he isn't on meds(though my moms thought about it)he makes good grades and he's a great reader(he's 10)

CantLiveWithoutYou
March 24th, 2011, 03:14 PM
So you're all arguing that 100% of the population has to have it for it to be normal? 50% of the population has a penis and 50% has a vagina, are you all saying there's a disease there? Or how bout dandruff, should we prescribe mephedrone for that because it might help and probably 30% or less of the population has it? Not like these drugs have side effects or anything, all those scientists must be lying! Right?

or
or How bout we prescribe everyone SSRI-based antidepressants every time they get a bit sad?

The 'overdiagnosing' of ADD/HD is a gimmick for pharm companies to sell their product to little kids because they don't have the free will to not take medicine that doesn't help half of them and has severe side effects.
Here's a list I remembered by myself, so it's probably only 25% of the side effects:
Cardiotoxicity, you give a kid this every school day for a year or two and they're at a higher risk for heart disease.
Severe appetite suppression, some kids become dangerously underweight because amphetamines kill your hunger for as long as you take them.
Dependence, seriously, we all know meth is addictive, and this is hardly different.
Allergic reactions, I can't really blame the medication for this, anyone can become allergic to anything at any time.
Overdose isn't that hard and can easily completely fuck a child's body, killing him, or making him a candidate for early death.
Insomnia, it's a stimulant for fuck sake, you're going to make your kid stay awake 22 hours a day.
Can stunt growth temporarily, and if you give it to a kid every day, permanently. I know a kid that's something like 4'10" in 9th grade because he has to take ritalin, whether it's related or not is debatable, but I'm just throwing it out there.
Headaches, probably from the medicine killing your kid.

If you're smart enough to give your kid THC though, the only side effect is maybe a bit dizzy or sometimes blurry vision, it's been proven to treat ADD/HD and DOES NOT get you high in the small doses required. I'd support diagnosing every kid in the world with it if you gave them all THC to shut them the fuck up.

Levi did you seriously think showing me a wall of text that describes symptoms of a non-existent 'disorder' would change my mind?




By the way whichever one of you retards tried to report this post on the 9th pressed the rep button. lmfao.

justmehere
March 24th, 2011, 08:03 PM
no. i'm not arguing. i'm just saying my brother has it. he has an actual problem(that isn't part of being a kid)but he also isnt on meds because my mom has worked hard to try and keep it under control.

Spook
March 25th, 2011, 01:23 PM
I agree that medicine doesn't help very much. Medicine isn't going to make you try to improve. It doesn't control you. You have to use will power to do that. Medicine just helps you control yourself more easily.

TheSleepingInsomniac
March 25th, 2011, 03:45 PM
My friend who is 21 and has adhd without all the education help when she went off her meds she would have flunked uni
is that just being a kid she is very mature

BOBBY HILL
March 25th, 2011, 09:11 PM
It's a disease.

Deal with it.

Alexithymia
March 26th, 2011, 10:28 PM
Yes it is. It's not a normal part of being a child. I never presented any symptoms worth of being considered being ADHD/ADD/etc, so how exactly is it normal if - as you state - it only affects 20% of adolescents?



That just shows you're somewhat intelligent, and can apply yourself. I've done that too. Yet, I've never been considered ADHD, and I've been to a psychiatrist.



See point #1, above.



So people who aren't considered ADHD/ADD/etc. are a "buzzkill"? Are we just social prudes in your eyes?



No, it's placed correctly here. It'd get more views in The White Padded Room, though.

- - -

Also, watch your language. I get you're "frustrated" or whatever, but there's no need.
Also my hero.

I -highly- doubt all 20% have a severe condition. I thought I had a medium condition, but I think it's mild now. And it IS a disease. Not only is it classified as a disease, but also there's a few psychiatrists who actually have heart and don't give that much about money. They still think ADHD is a disease. So, while I can understand your frustation, I don't think it's necessary to get upset about. I will admit, people who flaunt that they have ADHD are annoying and also probably are narcissists, but they're still there. And then there are the kids who you would never guess have ADHD because they take their medicine and are fine.

Being a kid does give you a lot of energy, but it doesn't mean every kid has ADHD. Kids without it can buckle down and focus if they need to. To me, I zone out whether I'm listening to my raid leader explain a fight on WoW (shush! I play that game) or if I'm listening to my Spanish teacher explain something.

Nancy Boy
March 27th, 2011, 07:10 PM
My little brother has it. It _IS_ a disease. I watched him struggle to keep his grades up, crying everynight while doing his homework *for hours* because he didnt focus enough in class.. Get all sad and lonely when he had to move classes and lose his friends. He got on medication and his grades went up and the struggling stopped.

You really need an adjustment of your view on life. i really dont know what your fucking deal is, but you need to calm down. You need help @CantLiveWithoutYou. Seriously.

Wetherbubble
April 8th, 2011, 06:22 PM
Its a Disorder Attention deficit disorder and attention deficit hyperactive disorder
^
That docent men disease

Syvelocin
April 9th, 2011, 02:07 AM
Disease.
Definition: a disordered or incorrectly functioning organ, part, structure, or system of the body resulting from the effect of genetic or developmental errors, infection, poisons, nutritional deficiency or imbalance, toxicity, or unfavorable environmental factors.

*cough*

CantLiveWithoutYou
April 13th, 2011, 03:08 PM
Disease.
Definition: a disordered or incorrectly functioning organ, part, structure, or system of the body resulting from the effect of genetic or developmental errors, infection, poisons, nutritional deficiency or imbalance, toxicity, or unfavorable environmental factors.

*cough*

Lol if a bunch of fucktards hadn't -rep me for this I would give you rep.

vampireonion
April 13th, 2011, 11:45 PM
I know a girl who has both ADD and ADHD. She's pretty out there, and obviously is not normal. I do agree that it is over-diagnosed and a cultural disorder. I also hate using the term disease for psychological disorders. It implies that people can't help themselves, when in fact we're our best chance for overcoming a disorder.

MyConfusion
May 8th, 2011, 01:21 AM
It's a disorder not a desease and with out my meds I have major trouble even more than I do with meds. It means I ..... I'm not going to go there but it's a DISORDER!

CantLiveWithoutYou
May 8th, 2011, 08:21 AM
DON'T FUCKING BUMP A MONTH OLD THREAD. If I get one more -rep because you bumped this I swear to god I will find where you live and kill you.

1_21Guns
May 8th, 2011, 11:21 AM
OP request :locked: