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tonymontana99
September 3rd, 2015, 10:18 PM
What are your thoughts on Blade Runner (1982)? Is it the greatest science fiction film of all time? Which version did you like the most? How does it make you feel to know you will never live in a dystopian cyberpunk world run by technocrats? (Feels pretty bad...)

It's interesting how this movie pretty much delivered the cyberpunk genre:

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_9rhPDLHWk

http://static.omelete.uol.com.br/media/extras/conteudos/blade-runner.jpg

The film depicts Los Angeles in November 2019, in which genetically engineered replicants, which are visually indistinguishable from adult humans, are manufactured by the powerful Tyrell Corporation as well as by other "mega-corporations" around the world. The use of replicants on Earth is banned and they are exclusively utilized for dangerous or menial work on off-world colonies. Replicants who defy the ban and return to Earth are hunted down and killed ("retired") by special police operatives known as "Blade Runners". The plot focuses on a group of recently escaped replicants hiding in Los Angeles and the burnt-out expert Blade Runner, Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), who reluctantly agrees to take on one more assignment to hunt them down.

"I've... seen things... you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion; I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate... All those... moments... will be lost, in time, like tears... in... rain. Time... to die."

phuckphace
September 4th, 2015, 12:10 AM
the film did a fairly good job of predicting what a near-future Los Angeles would look like. most science fiction goes with either a burned out Fallout dystopia or a super sleek and sterile Star Trek utopia. Blade Runner depicts tall, shiny skyscrapers looming above a mass of dirty lumpenproles squawking in 20 different languages - not an inaccurate portrayal of 2015 LA.

that said, the book it was loosely based on, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" does an even better job. one feature in the book, which the film omits, is the celebrity gossip show "Buster Friendly and his Friendly Friends", which stars a procession of android-celebs who are only famous for being famous (cf. Kim Kardashian) and plays 23 hours a day. notably the book was published in the 1960s, before the emergence of exactly that kind of inane celebrity programming. we're living in that dystopian future right now without even realizing it.

tonymontana99
September 4th, 2015, 01:12 PM
the film did a fairly good job of predicting what a near-future Los Angeles would look like. most science fiction goes with either a burned out Fallout dystopia or a super sleek and sterile Star Trek utopia. Blade Runner depicts tall, shiny skyscrapers looming above a mass of dirty lumpenproles squawking in 20 different languages - not an inaccurate portrayal of 2015 LA.

that said, the book it was loosely based on, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" does an even better job. one feature in the book, which the film omits, is the celebrity gossip show "Buster Friendly and his Friendly Friends", which stars a procession of android-celebs who are only famous for being famous (cf. Kim Kardashian) and plays 23 hours a day. notably the book was published in the 1960s, before the emergence of exactly that kind of inane celebrity programming. we're living in that dystopian future right now without even realizing it.

True, this film is amazing, too bad Ridley could only deliver his final vision -- and, in my opinion, the best version of the film -- in 2007, with the Final Cut. I haven't read the novel, though. The only dystopian novels I've read are 1984 and Brave New World. But speaking about movies, Logan's Run might also be a good dystopian scenery.

shiny skyscrapers looming above a mass of dirty lumpenproles squawking in 20 different languages - not an inaccurate portrayal of 2015 LA.

Top snek. Let's hope the future is full-blown cyberpunk and not some sort of green-friendly ecological dystopia like Obongo and the UN wants. If we're going to live in a dystopia, god damn it I demand that there are skyscrapers advertising megacorps, neon, smog and cybernetic organs. We either go all in, or nothing.

Typhlosion
September 6th, 2015, 03:58 PM
I still have to watch it. Maybe soon...

"I've... seen things... you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion; I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate... All those... moments... will be lost, in time, like tears... in... rain. Time... to die."

My father had me and my sister recite that by heart when we were young :hmm:

eric2001
September 6th, 2015, 04:15 PM
My dad got the dvd. Awesome looking and gr8 story

tonymontana99
September 6th, 2015, 08:52 PM
I still have to watch it. Maybe soon...



My father had me and my sister recite that by heart when we were young :hmm:

Based dad. This movie truly is one of the greatest things ever put on screen, it completely shits on modern science fiction movies it's not even funny. Truly a masterpiece.

http://www.zastavki.com/pictures/originals/2015/Movies_Art_for_the_film_Blade_Runner_095643_.jpg

phuckphace
September 22nd, 2015, 07:10 PM
gonna just expand a little on my earlier post, since I'm bored

the film cut out a lot of the good stuff from the book, hence I think it's not as good/noteworthy.

in the book, androids are characterized by their inability to experience empathy, an emotion which is said to be the defining trait of real humans. Deckard and his wife are followers of a wandering man named Mercer, whom they connect with using "empathy boxes" which allow his followers to join him in his spiritual journey. when he feels pain (thrown rocks, etc.) his followers feel it too. naturally, the androids are unable to do so because they aren't real humans, and routinely mock Mercer and his followers out of petty spite. Buster Friendly leads this mockery on his show, where he and his airheaded guests snicker and sneer at Mercerites for hours.

added to this are the artificial animals, which were also cut out of the film. humans in D.A.D.O.E.S. keep artificial animals as pets, again out of empathy and a genuine desire to care for a living animal (but most have to settle for an artificial animal because almost all real animals went extinct after a nuclear war). Deckard uses his paycheck from android-hunting to buy a real goat, but then the android Rachael kills it by pushing it off a roof, because she's a beautiful strong iCunt who don't need no empathy.

if Mercerism is a thinly disguised metaphor for Christianity (or perhaps, religion in general) it's not terribly difficult to imagine who the androids represent. if I had a dollar for every bitter, unfunny, rage-filled stand-up "comedian" out there who gets cheap laughs from poking fun at religious people, why, I'd have enough to buy out the Tyrell Corporation. Philip K. Dick did an excellent job using a dystopian setting to critique our broken-ass culture, whereas the film is basically just a hackneyed thriller with gunfights, cute chicks crying/dying, and of course FLYING MOTHERFUCKING CARS BITCH! while the movie isn't the worst, they could have done it a lot better.

tonymontana99
September 27th, 2015, 12:36 PM
gonna just expand a little on my earlier post, since I'm bored

the film cut out a lot of the good stuff from the book, hence I think it's not as good/noteworthy.

in the book, androids are characterized by their inability to experience empathy, an emotion which is said to be the defining trait of real humans. Deckard and his wife are followers of a wandering man named Mercer, whom they connect with using "empathy boxes" which allow his followers to join him in his spiritual journey. when he feels pain (thrown rocks, etc.) his followers feel it too. naturally, the androids are unable to do so because they aren't real humans, and routinely mock Mercer and his followers out of petty spite. Buster Friendly leads this mockery on his show, where he and his airheaded guests snicker and sneer at Mercerites for hours.

added to this are the artificial animals, which were also cut out of the film. humans in D.A.D.O.E.S. keep artificial animals as pets, again out of empathy and a genuine desire to care for a living animal (but most have to settle for an artificial animal because almost all real animals went extinct after a nuclear war). Deckard uses his paycheck from android-hunting to buy a real goat, but then the android Rachael kills it by pushing it off a roof, because she's a beautiful strong iCunt who don't need no empathy.

if Mercerism is a thinly disguised metaphor for Christianity (or perhaps, religion in general) it's not terribly difficult to imagine who the androids represent. if I had a dollar for every bitter, unfunny, rage-filled stand-up "comedian" out there who gets cheap laughs from poking fun at religious people, why, I'd have enough to buy out the Tyrell Corporation. Philip K. Dick did an excellent job using a dystopian setting to critique our broken-ass culture, whereas the film is basically just a hackneyed thriller with gunfights, cute chicks crying/dying, and of course FLYING MOTHERFUCKING CARS BITCH! while the movie isn't the worst, they could have done it a lot better.

Heathen. The Final Cut is the best thing ever. Name a Sci Fi film with a better setting and atmosphere. Protip you can't. If the studio hadn't fucked with Ridley back in '82 it would've been easily the movie to end all movies. It's a masterpiece. The amount of detail and back story behind it is amazing. I hope they don't fuck the sequel up (its being directed by the guy who did Prisoners and Sicario, cinematography by 12-time-Oscar-nominated Roger Deakins and co-written by Ridley, Hampton and Green.)