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Deceptica
February 23rd, 2015, 02:39 PM
Im an avid photographer, but im unsure which is the best camera to use! I wanna get the purrfect quality fur my photos!

JamesSuperBoy
February 23rd, 2015, 03:07 PM
You do want to research whats available no purrchase catastrophe.
I think also maybe what level to you want at price and features so many seem complex.
and what sort of pics will you take.

Maybe a basic camera and some free photo edit software or online editing would be good.

A tripod can be handy as well. and of course back up cards.

Horizon
February 23rd, 2015, 05:34 PM
If you are concerned about quality, take the time to learn how to take pictures properly. Learn the camera, it's functions, it's limits, etc. Only you can take the quality photo. It's a tired old saying, but it's not the camera that matters it's the photography. But it does help to have good technology behind the camera. So I suggest going to some place like best buy which sorta lets you demo the cameras. Stick the entry level ones if you don't know much, and learn it. Learn to compensate for light, learn to compose your image, learn how to get the shot.

ImCoolBeans
February 24th, 2015, 10:35 AM
If you are concerned about quality, take the time to learn how to take pictures properly. Learn the camera, it's functions, it's limits, etc. Only you can take the quality photo. It's a tired old saying, but it's not the camera that matters it's the photography. But it does help to have good technology behind the camera. So I suggest going to some place like best buy which sorta lets you demo the cameras. Stick the entry level ones if you don't know much, and learn it. Learn to compensate for light, learn to compose your image, learn how to get the shot.

This is great advice for anybody who is getting into photography. Learning how to properly use a camera and compose a shot is much more important than the technology itself. The difference between 15 and 22 megapixels isn't going to matter unless you're printing poster-sized photos, and even then, 15 MP would probably still be fine. The point I'm trying to make with that is that the person behind the camera matters much more than the kind of camera he or she is shooting. A lot of people like Nikon "for its focus" and a lot of people like Cannon "for it's color" but to be frank, it really doesn't matter what you're shooting if you know what you're doing, and nobody will really be able to tell the difference unless they see the camera.

I personally like Nikon cameras, but that's probably because my first "good" camera was a Nikon, which I actually still use, and I really learned how to shoot using it. Not really because it's so much better than a Cannon, Sony, or Fujifilm, although I do think it's better than Sony or Fujifilm :P

Deleted User
March 2nd, 2015, 01:11 PM
This is great advice for anybody who is getting into photography. Learning how to properly use a camera and compose a shot is much more important than the technology itself. The difference between 15 and 22 megapixels isn't going to matter unless you're printing poster-sized photos, and even then, 15 MP would probably still be fine. The point I'm trying to make with that is that the person behind the camera matters much more than the kind of camera he or she is shooting. A lot of people like Nikon "for its focus" and a lot of people like Cannon "for it's color" but to be frank, it really doesn't matter what you're shooting if you know what you're doing, and nobody will really be able to tell the difference unless they see the camera.

I personally like Nikon cameras, but that's probably because my first "good" camera was a Nikon, which I actually still use, and I really learned how to shoot using it. Not really because it's so much better than a Cannon, Sony, or Fujifilm, although I do think it's better than Sony or Fujifilm :P


Basically all of this. There's no such thing as the perfect camera, just more expensive ones with more features. If you really want to learn how to take better pictures, I'd suggest a manual SLR but film is expensive when it comes to learning so unless you have the budget, don't do that. Get an entry-level DSLR and set it to manual at all times. Learn aperture, learn focus, learn framing, learn all the basics so you can shoot manually and not rely on the camera to do the work for you. That doesn't make a photographer, your eye and your skill do.

There's no point spending thousands of dollars on a camera that people claim is perfect because it's simply not true. I have a Canon EOS Rebel T3 which was my first DSLR and honestly? No one knows I shoot on a Canon or what model. I've used Nikons as well which I like just as much but I'm more familiar with the Canon interface and because I shot on film before that, all my old SLR lenses (with an adaptor) fit on my DLSR. So it was logical to go with Canon just 'cause that's what my old equipment was already.

I think when it comes down to the whole "what camera should I get debate", what you need to do is set your budget and then go into a store that lets you test the cameras first. See how they feel, test the interface, take a few sample photographs. All these online reviews of cameras are good if you're really concerned about the technical specifications and do point out any major flaws if there are any but nothing tells you as much as using the camera yourself.

It still doesn't mean you're going to get perfect pictures. You can train a monkey to hold a camera and press the shutter button. You can't teach it ISO, aperture, shutter speed, and depth of field. People study photography for a reason and it's not because of the camera. I have perfectly framed and exposed shots that were taken with a piece of photo paper taped in a tin can that was sealed with only a tiny hole poked in the front to use as a lens and I had to sit there with a light meter to see how long to expose it. So if I can do that with a tin can, you don't need a "perfect" camera.

AnaPV
March 13th, 2015, 04:18 PM
Hi!

I had the same problem as you. I had a compact camera and I wanted a "more professional" camera. I mean, a reflex.

I didn't know what I should buy: a Canon EOS 600d? A Canon 700d, which is newer? Or maybe a 100d, that is lighter and a bit cheaper? Eventually, I bought the 600d. It's an articulated screen so you can take pictures (selfies) or videos of yourself easily.

I'm really glad I bought it and I don't regret doing it: it's lighter than 700d, although it's not as new as it. As it not weight that much, your neck won't hurt if you carry it on a trip.

I bought a pack that includes two lenses: 18-55 y 75-300, both EF (a type of lens - It's not the newer)

I create an account on Flickr, where I post all the photos I take. Here I show you some of them, so you can see the quality:

https://flic.kr/p/pdo5uB
https://flic.kr/p/oaFmSo
https://flic.kr/p/nbhDNX
https://flic.kr/p/qLdWux
https://flic.kr/p/qtPct1

I don't know much about Nikon cameras, but I think this is gonna be helpful to you.

Hope my reply helps you deciding on what camera you should by :)

:weekend:

Reanne
April 7th, 2015, 09:39 AM
The camera you choose should depend on what you want to take photos of. Unfortunately there is no one best camera. The quality of lenses also determines the quality of the images. Probably the best overall DSLR camera at the moment is the Nikon D810.

Uranus
April 7th, 2015, 09:58 AM
Well I'm no camera expert, but I'm sure lightPainting would have the answer :D

lightPainting
April 7th, 2015, 06:36 PM
I thought i already answered this one?? oh well.

Basically all of this. There's no such thing as the perfect camera, just more expensive ones with more features. If you really want to learn how to take better pictures, I'd suggest a manual SLR but film is expensive when it comes to learning so unless you have the budget, don't do that. Get an entry-level DSLR and set it to manual at all times. Learn aperture, learn focus, learn framing, learn all the basics so you can shoot manually and not rely on the camera to do the work for you. That doesn't make a photographer, your eye and your skill do.

There's no point spending thousands of dollars on a camera that people claim is perfect because it's simply not true. I have a Canon EOS Rebel T3 which was my first DSLR and honestly? No one knows I shoot on a Canon or what model. I've used Nikons as well which I like just as much but I'm more familiar with the Canon interface and because I shot on film before that, all my old SLR lenses (with an adaptor) fit on my DLSR. So it was logical to go with Canon just 'cause that's what my old equipment was already.

I think when it comes down to the whole "what camera should I get debate", what you need to do is set your budget and then go into a store that lets you test the cameras first. See how they feel, test the interface, take a few sample photographs. All these online reviews of cameras are good if you're really concerned about the technical specifications and do point out any major flaws if there are any but nothing tells you as much as using the camera yourself.

It still doesn't mean you're going to get perfect pictures. You can train a monkey to hold a camera and press the shutter button. You can't teach it ISO, aperture, shutter speed, and depth of field. People study photography for a reason and it's not because of the camera. I have perfectly framed and exposed shots that were taken with a piece of photo paper taped in a tin can that was sealed with only a tiny hole poked in the front to use as a lens and I had to sit there with a light meter to see how long to expose it. So if I can do that with a tin can, you don't need a "perfect" camera.
Carmilla says it perfectly. :)