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Rootin
May 1st, 2014, 03:54 PM
I'll get straight to the point.

About a week ago, my step-dad basically said to me that he thinks I have Asbergers. He wanted me to look up a online test, so i did. The test I did was a bit confusing but a lot of the questions I answered 'Yes' to.

So basically I think I might have it. What exactly does this mean and how can it affect me?

ksdnfkfr
May 1st, 2014, 04:05 PM
I'll get straight to the point.

About a week ago, my step-dad basically said to me that he thinks I have Asbergers. He wanted me to look up a online test, so i did. The test I did was a bit confusing but a lot of the questions I answered 'Yes' to.

So basically I think I might have it. What exactly does this mean and how can it affect me?

Aspergers is high functioning autism. It can be very mild or quite severe.
I'm autistic and as you can see in my sig belong to a couple of autism groups, so i've learned a bit about this. The question i think is how has it been effecting you? If you have it, it's always been effecting you, it's not going to start effecting you. so tell me in a nutshell how you think your life has been effected by this.

Gamma Male
May 1st, 2014, 04:48 PM
Even if you do have aspergurs, it's not like knowing that you have it will change anything. If you have it, you've had it your entire life. And if it hasn't caused a significant impairment of function yet there's not really anything to worry about.

backjruton
May 1st, 2014, 05:38 PM
Even if you do have aspergurs, it's not like knowing that you have it will change anything. If you have it, you've had it your entire life. And if it hasn't caused a significant impairment of function yet there's not really anything to worry about.

On the subject of support.. I started to get a lot more once I was diagnosed autistic so I know it does help. It doesn't change anything in your mind, you'll still feel the same, and I don't know about other countries and other circumstances but disability allowance too and I don't think I'll ever get a proper job, not that I want one anyway.....

I'll get straight to the point.

About a week ago, my step-dad basically said to me that he thinks I have Asbergers. He wanted me to look up a online test, so i did. The test I did was a bit confusing but a lot of the questions I answered 'Yes' to.

So basically I think I might have it. What exactly does this mean and how can it affect me?

Take on board what these have said because I don't want to repeat it but I did this too AFTER already being diagnosed to see how autistic I am, which is in a different order :lol::lol: if you think it's affecting you too much, get it investigated but if not you probably shouldn't because it can be quite an annoying process to go through and it was especially in my case :P

Rootin
May 1st, 2014, 11:53 PM
Alright, so I get that it won't suddenly start effecting me, but are there any positives of me knowing about this?

Thanks for your answers everyone.

Karkat
May 2nd, 2014, 02:22 AM
Aspergers is high functioning autism. It can be very mild or quite severe.
I'm autistic and as you can see in my sig belong to a couple of autism groups, so i've learned a bit about this. The question i think is how has it been effecting you? If you have it, it's always been effecting you, it's not going to start effecting you. so tell me in a nutshell how you think your life has been effected by this.

Mr. Shea hits the nail on the head once again. I'm not sure I can add much in the lines of this.

Even if you do have aspergurs, it's not like knowing that you have it will change anything. If you have it, you've had it your entire life. And if it hasn't caused a significant impairment of function yet there's not really anything to worry about.

Actually

When I started looking stuff up about Aspergers, it did change a lot. I didn't change, no, but my understanding of myself did.

I went from thinking "I AM SO WEIRD AND FREAKISH AND EMBARRASSING" to thinking "Holy fuck, I'm not alone. I'm not so weird. I can do this."

A lot of things made sense, and I started picking up on things I kind of knew were off, but couldn't ascribe words to. Like sensory issues. Especially with food and clothing.

(I would always grimace when kids sucked their clothes in school thinking HOW CAN THEY DO THAT???. One time, I was eating some bread and warm brie cheese- which agrees with my taste buds, but not anything else in my mouth apparently, and I COULD NOT get it down. I couldn't stop gagging. So I asked my older brother "Do you ever eat a food that your mouth likes...But your throat doesn't?" He was kind of like "Uh, no, if my throat doesn't like my food it's because I don't!" Then there's the fact that I was always irritated with socks, underwear, lack of underwear, tights, skirts, sweaters, hats. I never understood why no one else thought the cold was extremely painful. They called me a wimp. I thought I was. This is only to name a few.)

I mean, it's not going to change how you actually work, just how you view yourself and all. It does change things, but not how you think.

Alright, so I get that it won't suddenly start effecting me, but are there any positives of me knowing about this?

Thanks for your answers everyone.

Oh yes. Things get a lot easier to understand. If you have a quirk that you've felt bad about all your life (See: Hand flapping, odd facial expressions, lack of humour/strange sense of humour, inappropriateness that you don't find inappropriate until someone points it out to you, etc.) you can probably figure out why it's so by looking at others on the spectrum. Chances are, you're not only not alone (geez, awkward sentence phrasing ftw), you're probably fairly...'normal', in the world of the spectrum.

Not meaning you're not unique, or that it's a BAD thing, just that you no longer have to feel like some alien sent to earth without being told the minor piece of information that you are indeed an alien. Would've been nice to have been confirmed/denied sooner, at least for me imo. (Speaking of which- I think I've been meaning to ask Shea- is that where Wrongplanet got its name? Do you know? I mean, the more I think about it, the more it makes sense. Maybe it's actually super obvious and I'm just dense. Oh well. Wouldn't be the first time. :lol:)

Ah, anyways, knowledge is power. Sure, sometimes what you don't know can't hurt you, but sometimes, the pain of knowing is worth the power of the knowledge. Am I making any sense? It's 1:30 in the morning, and I'm in an interesting mood tonight.

Point being that knowing is usually a good thing- can't do anything about something you don't know, right?

ksdnfkfr
May 2nd, 2014, 05:04 AM
Alright, so I get that it won't suddenly start effecting me, but are there any positives of me knowing about this?

Coping is the main goal for someone with autism.
If you understand how/why you tick, the more equipped you are to cope.
That is if you have it. Those tests are basically a novelty. They don't count for any kind of real diagnosis to go by. there's a lot of disorders that are similar but completely different from Aspergers.

But if this is something that's having a minimal impact on your life then you don't need to be that specific. if Aspergers traits/symptoms fit what you're experiencing then go with that as a self diagnosed. Then if the question comes up, why you have trouble making friends, why you have fixed routines, so forth and so on - you can say "meh probably Aspergers". Instead asking of "WTF is wrong with me?!" your whole life.

But if you have serious problems going on, then its a good idea to get a professional diagnosis - in case it's not Aspergers and instead is something that needs treatment by way of meds or whatever.

Harizu
May 2nd, 2014, 12:10 PM
He wanted me to look up a online test, so i did.
If you want an advice, never trust online testing for mental disorders. They always give you results that make you look worse than you are.
I know because I was diagnosed with ADD and Asperger's and I hardly ever score as ADD and AS. No, I score as bipolar, schizophrenic and severely autistic. Not to mention that in the aspie quiz there are a lot of things related to sexuality, dyslexia, bipolar disorder and not to Asperger's.
The only test that is enough accurate and worth some trust is the AQ: but that only indicates your autism quotient, not where you are on the spectrum.
Asperger's in general is a very hard diagnosis to do. When I was 6 I was diagnosed with ADD, my mother was told that I could have had HFA but I wasn't diagnosed with it officially; at 13 I was officially diagnosed with Asperger's but when I was 14 I was told I didn't have it; then another therapist said I had it.
As for now I think I was misdiagnosed with it and that I only have ADD, even if everyone keeps telling me I have Asperger's.
Some people have it and are not diagnosed; others don't have it and are misdiagnosed.

So basically I think I might have it. What exactly does this mean and how can it affect me?
How would you answer these questions:
-Can you understand facial expressions? Can you "read" other people and understand what they might be feeling/their mood by looking at their expression/body language?
-Do you have such intense interests that it interferes with your other activities? For example, do you forget to do your homework/eat because you are too busy learning about your interests? (your profile says you are 18; this might not happen now anymore since you might have grown out of it; but it used to happen during your childhood?)
-Do you have a hard time expressing emotions in a "socially appropriate" way? For example, you tend to show no emotion at all or show too much emotion and this freaks people out?
-Is motor coordination a problem for you? I mean, both gross motor skills (sports, gait...) and fine motor skills (writing...)
-Are you often told you have a formal and/or repetitive speech?
-Do you tend to go on and on and on about your interests when talking to people?
-Do you have a really hard time focusing on what you're not interested in, or do you get low results when you're not interested in something?
-Are sensory issues a problem for you? I mean, are there sounds, lights, textures, smells, tastes that make you freak out and cause you meltdowns?
-Do you have meltdowns and/or shutdowns?
-Do you have troubles with eye-contact? (not looking into people's eyes or looking too much into people's eyes...)
-Do you stim? (clap your hands, swing from side to side...)
-Do you tend notice the details rather than the big picture?
-Do you have a hard time getting other people's humor, jokes, sarcasm, mataphors, or do you have a sense of humor that is considered "unusual" by others?
-Do you have a relative that displays similar traits?

There are many more aspects that are part of Asperger's, but they're too many to be listed here. These are the main ones.
Anyway, I am not a doctor. I advice you that, if those traits are causing you problems with your everyday functioning, you seek help from a psychiatrsist.

Karkat
May 2nd, 2014, 01:58 PM
I'm going to throw in that should you decide to seek a diagnosis, PLEASE make sure you can find one who A. will take you seriously as a person, and B. actually specializes in autism. My therapist literally laughed in my face and said it was "bullshit" that i thought I was on the spectrum. He said I never could be because I could maintain some amount of eye contact, could appreciate humour, I didn't have a monotonous voice or wander off constantly. (Funny thing is, I have a terrible time maintaining eye contact, I've forced myself to be able to maintain some level out of a spirit of "politeness"- if I was impolite as a little kid, I either got severely grounded or decked across the side of the head. As for the humour, yes, I appreciate it to some extent, but it's still a strange thing for me. I overthink it a lot. And I have a terrible time with not wandering off- though everyone attributes it to me having ADHD. If I see something even remotely interesting, I gravitate towards it. I lose whoever I'm with. I get yelled at a lot for it, actually. Or sometimes I'll find myself really in my head, and all of a sudden I'm at the other end of the store I was in.) And according to him, stimming is 100% normal and everyone does it. Aha, yes, because that's why I get weird looks when I hand flap. I'm under no impression that everyone does that, nor was I ever.

Yeah so my therapist specializes in anxiety disorders. Not autism. Nothing close to autism. He doesn't even know how to help me with being bipolar- he even admitted that wasn't his field of expertise. Anyways, find someone who actually knows what they're talking about, and won't write you off for being some silly kid.