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mattsmith48
August 4th, 2017, 03:26 PM
In the Climate Change In Canada thread I mention we have a province almost entirely on fire it looks like it's gonna get worst, so here's a few updates on this.

The two largest wildfires raging in B.C.'s Interior forced two new evacuation orders on Wednesday afternoon.

The evacuation order prompted by the Elephant Hill fire — which is now over 80,000 hectares — has expanded to include an area to the southwest of Clinton, which is already under an evacuation order.

Fire information officer Heather Rice said the order, which affects over 100 properties, is connected to a controlled burn that quickly got out of hand on Tuesday.

Further north, an evacuation order prompted by the C10812 wildfire to the west of Quesnel — which is now over 35,000 hectares — has expanded to include the Tatelkuz Lake Area. Those evacuated are asked to register at the emergency reception centre at 500 North Star Road in Quesnel.

Fire crews across B.C. are bracing for an "extraordinarily" hot stretch of weather forecast to begin Thursday, which could be followed by dry lightning over the weekend.

"Until we see a significant downturn in temperatures, and certainly until we see any rain, it is only going to get drier out there," said Kevin Skrepnek, B.C.'s chief fire information officer.

With the weekend's forecast calling for thunderstorms in many parts of the province, he said the province's 3,300 fire crews are anticipating a "significant number" of new fires if lightning were to strike without rain.

There was some good news on Wednesday, as one evacuation order — for the Wildwood community just north of Williams Lake — was lifted in the early evening.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/new-evacuation-orders-in-b-c-interior-as-large-wildfires-grow-1.4233076

More than 840 fires have charred about 4,260 square kilometres in B.C. since April 1, and officials say hot, dry weather is expected to worsen conditions in the days ahead as smoke hangs over several communities.

"It creates a lot of safety issues for our aircraft," said Kevin Skrepnek with the B.C. Wildfire Service. "We can't fight what we can't see out there."

The Kamloops Airport tweeted Tuesday that smoke had forced several flights in and out of the area to be delayed or cancelled.

Environment Canada has declared the air quality in Kamloops an 8 — or high risk — on its air quality health index.

With record-breaking temperatures expected across much of the province, it will be increasingly important to ensure crews get proper hydration, nutrition and rest, Skrepnek added.

Plans are also in place in case anyone needs to be airlifted out of a fire zone due to heat-related illness, but Skrepnek said he believes that hasn't happened yet this season.
Evacuation order expanded

Around 3,700 people were fighting 138 fires across British Columbia on Tuesday. Over 6,000 people are under evacuation order.

The Cariboo Regional District issued an expanded evacuation order for the Kluskus, Blackwater and Clisbako area, which is about 100 kilometres west of Quesnel.

It's a further expansion of the order issued on Sunday, July 30.

The Cariboo Regional District also issued an expanded evacuation alert for the area south and west of Quesnel to Tatelkuz Lake. Residents are advised to be prepared to leave their premises if an order is issued.

More than 300 structures destroyed

Officials have also begun to tally up the destruction wrought by the wildfires, with some estimating more than 300 structures have been destroyed.

The lost structures include 71 homes, 116 outbuildings such as sheds and barns, and three commercial buildings, said Robert Turner with Emergency Management B.C.

Another 115 destroyed buildings have yet to be identified.

Turner said the Cariboo Regional District, the Thompson-Nicola Regional District and the Ashcroft Indian Band have been the hardest hit by the losses but no critical infrastructure has been destroyed.

There has also been theft of critical equipment, the province said in a news release Tuesday.

One water pump and 10 100-foot (30 metre) hoses went missing near the Harrop area, which the province says is hindering suppression efforts on the Harrop Creek widlfire, burning 10 kilometres south of the communities of Harrop and Procter.

The RCMP is asking anyone with information about the theft to contact the RCMP or B.C. Crime Stoppers.

Outside personnel to arrive

There are cuurently 761 fire personnel from outside of the province helping with the fires and another 108 firefighters and support staff from Mexico are set to join them later this week.

This marks the first time crews from that country have fought wildfires in B.C., although the Mexicans have been deployed to Alberta several times, Skrepnek said.

"They're going to be valuable assets to us, just given what we've got," he said. "There's really no relief in sight."

It's common for people in the wildfire industry to work in different jurisdictions, and British Columbia's need currently outstrips crews that are available elsewhere in Canada, he added.

"No agency can be prepared for their highest potential fire season," he said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/thick-smoke-hinders-wildfire-fight-1.4231400

Requests from B.C. for more Canadian firefighters to help with the province's wildfire crisis are coming up short as summer temperatures rise across the country.

The B.C. Wildfire Service said Wednesday it is "running into shortages" when putting in requests for more fire crews to help battle 132 blazes burning across the province.

"We're utilizing these resources as the rest of the country is starting to steadily heat up," said Kevin Skrepnek, B.C.'s chief fire information officer.

Hundreds of firefighters from Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario and New Brunswick have already assisted local crews since mid-July.

On Tuesday, Skrepnek announced that a contingent of 108 Mexican fire personnel will arrive this week and head to the Cariboo region in the Interior to help out for the first time in B.C.
Peak of heat wave

Skrepnek said fire crews are bracing for an "extraordinarily" hot stretch of weather forecast to begin tomorrow, which could be followed by dry lightning over the weekend.

"Until we see a significant downturn in temperatures, and certainly until we see any rain, it is only going to get drier out there," he said.

Overnight, 10 fires started but given the current conditions, he called it a "surprisingly" low number.

With the weekend's forecast calling for thunderstorms in many parts of the province, he said the province's 3,300 fire crews are anticipating a "significant number" of new fires if lightning were to strike without rain.

The thick haze is another concern, he said, which makes it challenging to target flames from above ground. However, he also noted that smoke can have a "calming effect" by causing fires to be less active in some cases.

"It reflects a lot of the heat from the sun so the temperatures might not be as high as what has been forecast and it also traps a lot more moisture to the ground so that the humidity is higher, so it's not quite as dry," said Skrepnek.

Parts of the Interior have become so smoky, the air quality was rated 18 out of 10 on the Air Quality Health Index, or "very high risk."

Air quality advisories related to the wildfires have been issued by the province for much of the Interior, Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island.
Alerts and orders expanded

Skrepnek said the most concerning fire at the moment is the Elephant Hill fire threatening Clinton in the B.C. Interior.

It's scorched more than 84,000 hectares and is only 30 per cent contained despite the efforts of more than 500 firefighters.

On Tuesday night, the Thompson-Nicola Regional District expanded its evacuation alert around Cache Creek to include homes southwest of Clinton due to this fire.

Further north, the Cariboo Regional District issued an expanded evacuation order for the Kluskus, Blackwater and Clisbako area, which is about 100 kilometres west of Quesnel.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/requests-from-b-c-for-more-firefighters-coming-up-short-as-temperatures-rise-1.4232402

Periphery
August 4th, 2017, 03:47 PM
I actually was in BC a few weeks ago, we saw the fires from a distance and a lot of towns were filled with a horrible stench from them, can confirm it's really bad.

Snowfox
August 13th, 2017, 11:23 AM
So forest fires are new thing that didnt happen at all until recently because of climate change.

mattsmith48
August 13th, 2017, 11:29 AM
So forest fires are new thing that didnt happen at all until recently because of climate change.

Its more about how strong and frequent they are becoming.

Mars
August 13th, 2017, 12:01 PM
So forest fires are new thing that didnt happen at all until recently because of climate change.

Its more about how strong and frequent they are becoming.

Also, many countries and cities are in drought, and so this makes taking care of forest fires a lot more difficult.

mattsmith48
August 13th, 2017, 12:17 PM
Also, many countries and cities are in drought, and so this makes taking care of forest fires a lot more difficult.

And makes it more likely for new fire to start.

Cangirl
August 13th, 2017, 03:05 PM
the damage and size of the fires are incredible. Same with last year in the Fort McMurry fire. Its scary how dangerous fire is.

PlasmaHam
August 13th, 2017, 03:10 PM
It is weird how seemingly every natural disaster is somehow caused by climate change.

Anyhow, forest fires, as contradictory as it may seem, are essential for forest stability. Kills off the old dead wood to make room for fresh new trees.

mattsmith48
August 13th, 2017, 07:20 PM
It is weird how seemingly every natural disaster is somehow caused by climate change.

Not the natural disaster itself, but more the frequency and strength of the disaster.

Anyhow, forest fires, as contradictory as it may seem, are essential for forest stability. Kills off the old dead wood to make room for fresh new trees.

True, but not like this, this is not normal.

Dalcourt
August 13th, 2017, 10:25 PM
Not the natural disaster itself, but more the frequency and strength of the disaster.


It's the same where I live.
Not with wildfires of course but with storms and flooding.

Flooding is a natural occurrence where I live and always was the strength and frequency however isn't normal.
They do studies and it seems it isn't just coincidence and bad luck. Even the thickest here believe it now since the feel the immediate effects.

Climate change is happening no matter if some people here or elsewhere might deny it.
So instead of wasting our energy arguing with a couple of brickwalls here we should use our energy for doing all we can do ourselves to at least slow down climate change. Those in denial will get fewer on their own I see it happening here where I live everyday.

Agent X
August 13th, 2017, 10:58 PM
IDK about the climate change portion, but y'all need to stop sending your smoke into the US. I live in Washington, and we haven't seen blue sky in a few weeks because of all of your smoke haha

mattsmith48
August 13th, 2017, 11:07 PM
IDK about the climate change portion, but y'all need to stop sending your smoke into the US. I live in Washington, and we haven't seen blue sky in a few weeks because of all of your smoke haha

We'll put it in NAFTA ;)

PlasmaHam
August 13th, 2017, 11:30 PM
A wall along the Canadian border should keep out the smoke, and we will make Canada pay for it! ;)

mattsmith48
August 14th, 2017, 11:06 AM
A wall along the Canadian border should keep out the smoke, and we will make Canada pay for it! ;)

Jokes on you if you build a wall we can't sell you our oil.

mattsmith48
August 20th, 2017, 12:38 PM
Got an update on this, spoiler alert it's not getting better.

B.C. has extended a state of emergency until Sept. 1 as wildfires continue to burn throughout the province.

This is the third extension issued since the state of emergency was originally declared on July 7, with previous extensions on July 19 and Aug. 4.

The state of emergency, which applies to the whole province, ensures that federal, provincial and local resources are co-ordinated to respond to the wildfire situation and maintain public safety.

It also makes the wildfire response the province's number 1 priority, and gives emergency resources special authority to deal with the firefighting efforts.
Worst year on record

There are currently 138 wildfires burning in B.C., with 27 evacuation orders affecting approximately 4,400 people, and 40 evacuation alerts impacting approximately 20,700 people.

As of Thursday afternoon, $321.6 million had been spent by the B.C. Wildfire Service to fight the fires.

There have been 1,031 fires in the province since April 1, burning over 900,000 hectares of land, and making 2017 the worst wildfire season on record.

That record was previously set in 1958, when 855,000 hectares burned.

On Friday, Environment Canada issued a special weather statement for the B.C. Interior, warning of strong winds and potential thunderstorms over the weekend.

According to the B.C. Wildfire Service, fire crews are concerned that strong winds without substantial rain will fuel the many fires burning throughout the region.

They're particularly concerned about the Hanceville-Riske Creek fire and the Elephant Hill fire, which haven't experienced significant growth since Wednesday.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/state-of-emergency-extended-until-sept-1-as-b-c-wildfire-crisis-continues-1.4253164