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Sere
July 20th, 2017, 12:46 AM
I just wanted to ask a few things.


So earlier this year I was diagnosed with Visual Snow. (Yet I've had it my whole life) and I wanted to see if there were any treatments...

What is visual snow?
Wikipedia:
"Visual snow (VS), also known as visual static, is a disorder in which people see white or black dots in the whole of their visual fields."
Me:
It's where I see tv like static over EVERYTHING. It's even worse in the dark and the worst when you close your eyes. I've gotten used to it and it's not gonna kill me (I hope) yet it's still quite annoying and disrupting when trying to function in a dark setting.

Q1
Are there any treatments/cures? I was going to see a neurologist bla bla after the eye doctor said I had it but it's $$$ and I dont need to waste $$$ on an annoyance...
Q2
Does anyone else on VT have it or think they have it from what I described..?

Sorry if this wasted your time :(

Ragle
July 20th, 2017, 04:45 AM
Guess, it's up to me to sorry, if I waste your time, but I'm curious
- is it similar to those pics you see world?


https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-0a8e70b331d8a63cae780eb981632b6f

http://images.yuku.com.s3.amazonaws.com/image/gif/ac715bc2b22faeadcf7782fe17f64d6d00abd4a.jpg

Sere
July 20th, 2017, 10:32 AM
Guess, it's up to me to sorry, if I waste your time, but I'm curious
- is it similar to those pics you see world?


image (https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-0a8e70b331d8a63cae780eb981632b6f)

image (http://images.yuku.com.s3.amazonaws.com/image/gif/ac715bc2b22faeadcf7782fe17f64d6d00abd4a.jpg)

Similar but in those lighting situations the static wouldn't be too bad. Plus my vision is 👌 (close to 20/20) except for the static :(

Babs
July 20th, 2017, 02:38 PM
ah, i have experienced the same thing my entire life. it doesn't bother me. a quick click on google tells me that it's a poorly understood condition and there isn't a definitively known cause or cure, so get hip to it my friend.

Ragle
July 22nd, 2017, 12:34 PM
I watched a few videos on the topic on YT. The most of them were mostly about crowdfunding or similar projects.

one video ran over an hour and had visual snow and tinitus as a theme. Ok, my attention span lasted only 30 minutes. But I still found it interesting. Especially how few doctors seem to know about it and how rude some of them react and even mark patients as simulants.

And this in the age of digital information via data highway.

Romulus_
July 22nd, 2017, 11:25 PM
Oh yes I get that a bunch if I stand up way too quickly after laying down for a while. Like you said they're pretty annoying, but idk if I'd bother spending tons of money for a neurosurgeon to fix it. Aside from that though I don't think there's a cure for it, so it's really all up for you to decide

Amethyst Rose
July 25th, 2017, 12:00 AM
hjhj

I don't have visual snow myself, but I do have a natural curiosity for conditions related to the eyes. I did a bit of digging, hope this is helpful :)

I remembered a post you made recently about experiencing light-headedness when you wake up and, based on the articles I'm about to link, I wonder if it is connected to your visual snow. Reading this article (http://www.positivehealth.com/article/anatomy-and-physiology/treatment-approaches-for-visual-snow) will tell you that damage to the sub occipital muscles (found at the base of your skull) can cause visual snow, and you can see here (http://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/disorders/central/migraine/occipital_neuralgia.html) that the same muscles are the culprit of another condition that can cause migraines. You didn't mention headaches (and you're not the age listed as common for occipital neuralgia) but the light-headedness led me to suspect there could be an issue surrounding this muscle group, and maybe seeing a neurologist/getting a scan could be beneficial.

Sere
July 26th, 2017, 12:50 AM
hjhj

I don't have visual snow myself, but I do have a natural curiosity for conditions related to the eyes. I did a bit of digging, hope this is helpful :)

I remembered a post you made recently about experiencing light-headedness when you wake up and, based on the articles I'm about to link, I wonder if it is connected to your visual snow. Reading this article (http://www.positivehealth.com/article/anatomy-and-physiology/treatment-approaches-for-visual-snow) will tell you that damage to the sub occipital muscles (found at the base of your skull) can cause visual snow, and you can see here (http://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/disorders/central/migraine/occipital_neuralgia.html) that the same muscles are the culprit of another condition that can cause migraines. You didn't mention headaches (and you're not the age listed as common for occipital neuralgia) but the light-headedness led me to suspect there could be an issue surrounding this muscle group, and maybe seeing a neurologist/getting a scan could be beneficial.

Ty for the info and the articles. I do not get frequent headaches/migraines. The light headed is a mildly nice feeling. And lastly, I can't see the neurologist anymore since we removed the appointment because of the price point. None of this is pain I'm unable to bear. Tho I do feel fine now :lol: (also the light headed feeling isn't just in the mornings fyi)

elmoc
July 26th, 2017, 09:22 PM
Amethyst Rose gave some very detailed info that is probably more than your doctor knows. She is obviously very knowledgeable!

Now for my biology neediness: The "light headed" might be related to your vision problems, or could be completely separate. I'm not sure exactly what light headed means, but will guess that you are feeling a bit dizzy or disoriented. According to my research (I love the challenge, too, Rose) it appears those symptoms are most frequently caused by:
1. Orthostatic hypotension, which means that stand up quickly it can result in a momentary drop of blood pressure to your brain, or
2. Medication side effects that result in orthostatic hypotension. This evidently means prescription medicines, but can also be antihistamines, & several routine non-prescription medicines.

To check for orthostatic hypotension, it is suggested that you take your blood pressure while laying down, & check it quickly after you stand up. Write the date, time, & blood pressure numbers down. Repeat this several times during the day. If there is a significant difference, you should talk to your doctor about it. If you take antihistamines like Claritin, Benadryl, or Zyrtec, you might want to try stopping those medicines for a few days, then checking your blood pressures again.

Please do NOT try the blood pressure test by stopping ANY prescription medicines without talking to your doctor or pharmacist. (I know, I sound like one of the TV commercials for new medicines, but this is important). You mentioned a neurologist, & stopping Meds they prescribed could cause seizures. I wish you could see an ophthalmologist (eye doctor that is a MD or DO), because that might be the most helpful. I would hate to have.your vision begin to deteriorate due to eye problems that could have been caught early. I did find info that says increased "intraoccular pressure," pressure of the fluid inside of your eyeball, can cause your symptoms

The information I read says that temporary visual problems can occur with orthostatic hypotension, but nothing mentioned your visual snow.
I hope this is helpful.

I am not a doctor & don't play one on television.

Sere
July 27th, 2017, 11:20 PM
Amethyst Rose gave some very detailed info that is probably more than your doctor knows. She is obviously very knowledgeable!

Now for my biology neediness: The "light headed" might be related to your vision problems, or could be completely separate. I'm not sure exactly what light headed means, but will guess that you are feeling a bit dizzy or disoriented. According to my research (I love the challenge, too, Rose) it appears those symptoms are most frequently caused by:
1. Orthostatic hypotension, which means that stand up quickly it can result in a momentary drop of blood pressure to your brain, or
2. Medication side effects that result in orthostatic hypotension. This evidently means prescription medicines, but can also be antihistamines, & several routine non-prescription medicines.

To check for orthostatic hypotension, it is suggested that you take your blood pressure while laying down, & check it quickly after you stand up. Write the date, time, & blood pressure numbers down. Repeat this several times during the day. If there is a significant difference, you should talk to your doctor about it. If you take antihistamines like Claritin, Benadryl, or Zyrtec, you might want to try stopping those medicines for a few days, then checking your blood pressures again.

Please do NOT try the blood pressure test by stopping ANY prescription medicines without talking to your doctor or pharmacist. (I know, I sound like one of the TV commercials for new medicines, but this is important). You mentioned a neurologist, & stopping Meds they prescribed could cause seizures. I wish you could see an ophthalmologist (eye doctor that is a MD or DO), because that might be the most helpful. I would hate to have.your vision begin to deteriorate due to eye problems that could have been caught early. I did find info that says increased "intraoccular pressure," pressure of the fluid inside of your eyeball, can cause your symptoms

The information I read says that temporary visual problems can occur with orthostatic hypotension, but nothing mentioned your visual snow.
I hope this is helpful.

I am not a doctor & don't play one on television.
Ty for the research. As I stated before I'm unable to visit the neorolgist or anything. My description of.light headed is a close match to yours but not bad feeling and is happening less and less now. My visual snow may have come off as a large problem tho it doesn't have effect on many ways I live my life. I have lived with it my whole life and it hasn't really changed in it's amount of static or anything. I take a perscription allergy medicant and benydryl often. I don't know how to check my blood pressure either. And it's not fully when I stand up quickly. Idk how to explain it but it's when I do certain things. I would like to state I physically feel fine. Ty for the response :lol:

elmoc
July 28th, 2017, 09:59 PM
Glad to hear that it is becoming less of an issue for you. Two possible options decide you need a specialist & if you cannot afford one:
1. Some states require schools to pay for evaluation of learning problems. If you feel that the visual snow is causing learning problems....IDK, might not be realistic
2. Would you qualify for Medicaid?

Not trying to be pushy, but I would hate for your vision/eyes to get worse as you age.

I will butt out now! :-)

jamie_n5
July 29th, 2017, 03:18 PM
I don't have any suggestions or answers for you. I just wanted to give you my moral support and tell you that I am so proud of you for posting this and the way you are handling this and dealing with it too. You are obviously a strong and wonderful person. I hope and pray that they will find some treatment for this that works and isn't so costly.