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View Full Version : Parents owe me $20K


random canadian
February 2nd, 2017, 08:21 PM
I've had a part time job for 3 1/2 years now, the only reason I got it was because my dad quit his job, and was unemployed. My parents used my money to pay bills, with the promise of paying it back. I've only Ben able to spend a few thousand of the money I've earned, and haven't seen a single cent of the money they borrowed. There's no reason why they can't pay me back, I've gone and created a budget that would keep everything paid, and pay me back $300 a month. All they had to do was cut back on alcohol and smokes. I doubt I'll ever see that money, and I doubt I'll be able to go to college this year because of it

ska8er
February 2nd, 2017, 08:49 PM
I'm not saying that they don't owe u the money
but if u lived in the same house did the money u
loaned them paid for the food-utilities and any
other costs that u also benefited from-if so then
I think u will have a hard time trying to get it back.

Uniquemind
February 2nd, 2017, 09:03 PM
Well I guess if you know how to be cold shouldered you could pull back on elder care costs for them once you're an adult.

Who knows maybe they will return the money decades down the road.

It all depends on how vindictive you want to be versus a forgiving child.


To be honest though you should be working for yourself regardless if you parent go laid off or not. So a mindset change might be a good thing there.

Straya
February 6th, 2017, 12:59 AM
I've had a part time job for 3 1/2 years now, the only reason I got it was because my dad quit his job, and was unemployed. My parents used my money to pay bills, with the promise of paying it back. I've only Ben able to spend a few thousand of the money I've earned, and haven't seen a single cent of the money they borrowed. There's no reason why they can't pay me back, I've gone and created a budget that would keep everything paid, and pay me back $300 a month. All they had to do was cut back on alcohol and smokes. I doubt I'll ever see that money, and I doubt I'll be able to go to college this year because of it

you can always sue and have the courts deduct the money owed to you from there pay

Uniquemind
February 6th, 2017, 02:06 AM
you can always sue and have the courts deduct the money owed to you from there pay

Yeah but "time", and "lawyer fees", and just the fact that they're in a position of retaliation over the resources like shelter, water, food, and healthcare.


Not a wise move on the chessboard.

Just JT
February 6th, 2017, 08:34 PM
Seems to me that family is who you turn to when you need help bro. Don't really matter the kinda help that's needed. You just do it. And if that don't work out for what ever reason then you know when they need it again then "I'm not in a position to help right now" is the answer.

About the cash they owe, its just gone bro, let it go. It's family. Alls your guna do if you pushnit is cause bad feelings. And you only got 1 set of parents.

Not saying it's right. It's wrong on their part. But learn from that. Now you know.

I'm sorry that happened to you, maybe college next year if you don't get financial aid or what ever

Don't sue your parents. Let it go, it is what it is, let it go and move on. Bad loan

Straya
February 7th, 2017, 05:18 AM
Yeah but "time", and "lawyer fees", and just the fact that they're in a position of retaliation over the resources like shelter, water, food, and healthcare.


Not a wise move on the chessboard.

well if the op was under 18 when the loan was made then all those things you listed are expected to be provided free of charge by the parents and lawyers fees and court fees can be added to the money been sued for

Emilyyy
February 7th, 2017, 05:54 AM
This is a really tough situation, if you've already spoken to your parents about your thoughts on the situation then there's really nothing you can do. When you move out you'd be in a better position to then hold back on money if they need it then but while you live with them, they have all the power. It's pretty crap what they have done but don't think there's much you can do :(

Just JT
February 7th, 2017, 11:55 AM
well if the op was under 18 when the loan was made then all those things you listed are expected to be provided free of charge by the parents and lawyers fees and court fees can be added to the money been sued for

Actually, that all depends on the local law where you live. Where I live, if under 18 you can't legally own money. So the kids money legally is the parents. Like right now I have money in the bank. It's mine, but the bank account is my dad's. He's also the executor of my trust. And he can do what ever he wants with all that money. That's the law. Not sure how it works in the OP's location (Canada) but probably not much different than here (USA). where you live that may be true.

Just saying

Uniquemind
February 8th, 2017, 03:13 AM
Actually, that all depends on the local law where you live. Where I live, if under 18 you can't legally own money. So the kids money legally is the parents. Like right now I have money in the bank. It's mine, but the bank account is my dad's. He's also the executor of my trust. And he can do what ever he wants with all that money. That's the law. Not sure how it works in the OP's location (Canada) but probably not much different than here (USA). where you live that may be true.

Just saying

Depends on the type of "trust" it is.

I'm pretty sure some "trusts" aren't touchable, and can only have money deposited into it, not withdrawn.

It depends though.



And while you can sue for attorney's fees, if the parents are already hard-up for cash, even if you win, you might not get a payout.

You can't get a $100K payout if the person being sued only has $50K left in the bank.




Let's also not forget that the dreaded vice of alcoholic addiction and tobacco addiction seems to plague household incomes.

Idk if it's the industry's plan or not, but I always feel individuals making $10K-$80K, always have huge vices of drinking and smoking.

It's not the case for everyone but those habits easily drain $3000 a year away from what logically should be stored and saved or spent on other necessities.

The OP's parents seem to have what was in the beginning a incompetence or unhappiness complex in their own self-esteem, that they nursed with substances, and is now an addiction and a financial problem.

Just JT
February 8th, 2017, 06:51 AM
Depends on the type of "trust" it is.

I'm pretty sure some "trusts" aren't touchable, and can only have money deposited into it, not withdrawn.

It depends though.



And while you can sue for attorney's fees, if the parents are already hard-up for cash, even if you win, you might not get a payout.

You can't get a $100K payout if the person being sued only has $50K left in the bank.




Let's also not forget that the dreaded vice of alcoholic addiction and tobacco addiction seems to plague household incomes.

Idk if it's the industry's plan or not, but I always feel individuals making $10K-$80K, always have huge vices of drinking and smoking.

It's not the case for everyone but those habits easily drain $3000 a year away from what logically should be stored and saved or spent on other necessities.

The OP's parents seem to have what was in the beginning a incompetence or unhappiness complex in their own self-esteem, that they nursed with substances, and is now an addiction and a financial problem.

Your right. And I spoke a little outa turn. My dad can use it as he pleases but only for my benifit

Anyways. Yes you can sue for more than They have. The court can order the sale of all assets and levy all financial accounts to settle the lefts obligation. As well as garnish future incomes

But that all depends on local laws. We're talking about this situation coming from several different countries. I'm sure there are differences from each one

Deleted User
February 8th, 2017, 09:37 AM
Okay, so you're in luck because I'm also from Ontario and I'm over 18 so I can probably give you some better (or at least more geographically relevant) advice.

First, I did sue a parent for money. And yes, I won. But there were certain conditions that needed to be met: a) the parent was meant to be paying child support; this is something agreed upon in a written divorce agreement and can be legally enforced at any time, b) I had to meet certain criteria to receive these child support payments at all, and c) I had to be ready to face the consequences.

I got about $5k in child support previously unpaid but I'm now estranged from that parent and their entire side of the family. Does that sound worth it to you? Well, that's up to you. (But it sucks, trust me.)

Technically, if you are a minor and willingly gave this money to your parents, very few lawyers will take your case. If your name is on the job's payroll then the money is to your name, yes, but since you were not paying "rent" as part of a lease agreement, any passage of would be considered a gift. They are not legally required to reimburse you. And some parents are just like that: they won't. Not to mention, lawyers fees are EXPENSIVE. And I mean several thousand dollars that you probably don't have after all of this. How much is that money worth to you? Probably a lot, yes, but if you're young, you have plenty of time to work and earn it back.

(I'm assuming you're a minor if you're just starting college or university but I waited until I was 19 so I'm trying to tackle this from all angles. As an adult, you might have different options but again, it depends on how much your remaining money is worth to you and how badly you want this money back.)

The other part of this is that you are eligible for OSAP. Unless your parents are millionaires, OSAP will rarely deny you. If you're living at home during school, OSAP won't give as much to cover living expenses but they can certainly cover your tuition and supplies. If you come from a low-income household (as I do because I am living alone and legally disabled, therefore only working a part-time job 5-10 hours a week) you're eligible for a grant that's around $2k and a loan that is determined by your application. Mine is pretty high but I also have to pay rent, electricity, internet, etc. Almost all schools also have entrance bursaries and bursaries for students in need of financial assistance to get them through school. OSAP and financial aid bursaries can be reapplied for at the beginning of each academic year.

Loans need to be paid back. Grants and bursaries are money granted to you under certain circumstances that are yours to keep, provided that your financial status does not suddenly drastically change (e.g. you win the lottery for five million bucks or your parents start making over a certain threshold of household income during this period of time). In general, if you're proactive about seeking out financial assistance, your loan will only be about 30-40% percent of the money you receive and OSAP has recently changed how long the grace period is to repay it after you graduate. In addition, Trudeau is implementing new grants and bursaries for students in need of significant financial aid as of September 2017 so you're luckier than I am in terms of how much debt you may or may not be in.

Keep in mind that if for whatever reason your family is receiving Ontario Works or ODSP, you'll need to talk to the caseworker about applying for OSAP as you cannot technically have both at the same time as an independent adult. As a dependent minor or dependent adult, there are separate rules but you would have to talk to someone who works specifically with OW or ODSP for better details.

Hope some if not any of this helps. I have a friend whose parents did something similar and I get that it's frustrating and angering and often times there is little you can do about it. But you do have options to help you get through school and I'd recommend not spending anymore of the money you do have because you're gonna need to learn to budget once you start school and probably won't be able to work the same hours, especially if you go into residence or choose to move out.