PDA

View Full Version : Money or Passion


bentheplayer
December 23rd, 2016, 07:02 AM
Pretty self explanatory poll. So which would you choose and why.

Fleek
December 23rd, 2016, 10:30 AM
What I happen to love as a future career gives good pay.

You have to be happy with your job all the way around.

Endeavour
December 23rd, 2016, 10:51 AM
I would rather have a job I like and get paid less money than a job I would hate but with lots of money. Money doesn't equal happiness at all. Your happiness should always be considered more important than how much money you have.

Amethyst Rose
December 23rd, 2016, 10:54 AM
I would rather have a job I like and get paid less money than a job I would hate. Money doesn't equal happiness at all.

This sums up my thoughts perfectly. My future career path isn't the most stable tbh, and won't always yield a lot of money. But it's something I'm passionate about and that's all that matters.

Jinglebottom
December 23rd, 2016, 11:24 AM
I would rather live comfortably. I find happiness in traveling and exploring all corners of the world (besides a few) and getting to know different cultures, which are things you cannot achieve without money. I don't care about having a job I'm passionate about considering I'm not particularly passionate about anything, to be frank.

mick01
December 23rd, 2016, 12:21 PM
I hope I choose passion over money. I like the expression that kind of says "find something you love to do and you'll never work a day in your life."

Just JT
December 23rd, 2016, 01:40 PM
Money cant buy happiness or love. Money can buy a lot of things, home, clothing, vacations, nice cars or whatever. But if you are doing things you don't like, everyday all day, I wouldn't be happy. Even with all th cash I could carry. Cause there's no place to spend it that matters

gemma.2000
December 23rd, 2016, 06:42 PM
Both lol

everlong
December 23rd, 2016, 08:50 PM
I think both is the easy answer, besides that, I don't know. I don't really have a passion right now so I guess money?

rioo
December 23rd, 2016, 09:43 PM
big passion can bring happiness. big money can gaining access to luxury.. )

Mina
December 23rd, 2016, 10:08 PM
Passion! Cos if u ain't happy then even if u got lots money it's no use :)

bonbon
December 24th, 2016, 12:16 AM
Passion. Money is useful, but not a goal in life by itself.

PinkFloyd
December 24th, 2016, 01:19 AM
I chose both, but it's kind of a 60/40 split. Money is really important, but I don't want to hate my job.

Uniquemind
December 24th, 2016, 03:28 AM
Passion, because if you know what you love and live life inspired you're more likely to get "flow" which will eventually lead to $, which you can invest in your passions again to create an endless feedback loop.

If you start off with a lot of money, without a passion, it can be misused to much self-harm even by accident.

PunkModRevial
December 24th, 2016, 05:04 PM
I said passion, because I figure if I do what I want to do, I'll be happy. I'd rather be poor and happy than rich and hating life. Plus, if you're really invested in your passion, you'll find a way to make things work out. :)

bentheplayer
December 25th, 2016, 12:24 AM
Haha I absolutely agree that ideally we should have both but where would you choose to draw the line? At what level of income? Unfortunately we can't always have the cake and eat it.

Microcosm
December 25th, 2016, 04:35 PM
"If money can't buy happiness then why is it so fabulous?" -Poppy

lel

I feel like having money is very important to having a happy life for most people. People who like to have friendships, maybe want to get married, those people are gonna need money. Some people don't mind not having that stuff, they're content on their own just doing something that makes them happy. I don't think that's most people though.

Personally, I want to do something that makes me happy, gets the bills paid, and still leaves me plenty of room to buy and do what I want. Without money, you can't travel the world and experience some of the wonderful opportunities life has to offer.

Some would say capitalism enslaves, but alternatively you could say it gives you incentive to do something useful or contributive to others.

bentheplayer
December 25th, 2016, 11:07 PM
"If money can't buy happiness then why is it so fabulous?" -Poppy

lel

I feel like having money is very important to having a happy life for most people. People who like to have friendships, maybe want to get married, those people are gonna need money. Some people don't mind not having that stuff, they're content on their own just doing something that makes them happy. I don't think that's most people though.

Personally, I want to do something that makes me happy, gets the bills paid, and still leaves me plenty of room to buy and do what I want. Without money, you can't travel the world and experience some of the wonderful opportunities life has to offer.

Some would say capitalism enslaves, but alternatively you could say it gives you incentive to do something useful or contributive to others.

Precisely. The current flavor of our generation is to go chase after our passion. But it fails to account for the need to pay bills or the ability to buy opportunities that we want. Money may not buy happiness but it enables us to get things/experiences we want. However, at the same time its gonna suck doing a job we hate just for the money. So whats the right balance in ur opinion? What level of income should be deemed as sufficient?

messid
December 26th, 2016, 12:50 AM
I wanna get a job with a high salary and then do my passions on the side!

Microcosm
December 26th, 2016, 01:33 AM
Precisely. The current flavor of our generation is to go chase after our passion. But it fails to account for the need to pay bills or the ability to buy opportunities that we want. Money may not buy happiness but it enables us to get things/experiences we want. However, at the same time its gonna suck doing a job we hate just for the money. So whats the right balance in ur opinion? What level of income should be deemed as sufficient?

Amount certainly depends on location as cost of living can vary tremendously. It also depends on marital status as well as whether one has children. It's hard to really put a number on it because of such things.

Furthermore, I think it isn't necessarily about a balance. Having plenty of money, for instance, would allow you to pursue any passion you want to. So, if a high-income job is pursued early on, then one can retire early, have plenty of money, and still be able to pursue passions.

azure moonstone
December 26th, 2016, 10:11 AM
Since I'm already going to school to be a teacher....passion, by default. :lol:

I'll never have a lot of money unless I marry into it, or I win the lottery. That's ok, though. I'd rather be happy, want to go to work, and feel like I am doing something worthwhile.

City Kid
December 26th, 2016, 11:46 AM
Well, both, obviously?

But if I had to pick, I'd choose passion. At my old school, I experienced what it was like to have to spend hours and hours every day at a place I hated and I never want my life to be like that again. Still, I do take the amount of money I could possibly earn in the careers I'm interested in into consideration. For me, there was a choice between becoming a writer of some sort or going into IT. (Two very different things, I know.) I chose IT, mainly because I think I'll have better chances at getting a stable and well-paid job there. So far I'm very happy with my decision. (Even though I sometimes wonder what my life would be like if I had pursued my other passion.)

Vlerchan
December 26th, 2016, 03:28 PM
Passion > Money.

Most highpaying jobs are highpaying precisely because they eliminate a lot of the free time you have to do what your passionate about. Furthermore, you are taking a significant risk in that you might be able to retire early and pursue your passions only then (which I always found rather sad).

I guess part of the reasoning behind my choice is that I am also European. I like to travel but can do that relatively cheaply across the continent. Otherwise, most of my interests cost basically zero to sustain.

People who like to have friendships, maybe want to get married, those people are gonna need money.
These sound like the sort of friendships and marriages that no right-thinking person would touch with a mile-long barge pole. I might understand if you only mean marriage in terms of paying for it, but that's well within the reach of the average person, who isn't as inclined to chase money.

Here you're much better off choosing the job you are passionate about anyways; you are more likely to bump into people you share interests with (which is much more important in the development of sustained relationships). The reason I am pursuing what I am pursuing has as much to do with connecting with people that interest me, as I am passionate about the field.

Uniquemind
December 26th, 2016, 08:36 PM
Precisely. The current flavor of our generation is to go chase after our passion. But it fails to account for the need to pay bills or the ability to buy opportunities that we want. Money may not buy happiness but it enables us to get things/experiences we want. However, at the same time its gonna suck doing a job we hate just for the money. So whats the right balance in ur opinion? What level of income should be deemed as sufficient?

"If money can't buy happiness then why is it so fabulous?" -Poppy

lel

I feel like having money is very important to having a happy life for most people. People who like to have friendships, maybe want to get married, those people are gonna need money. Some people don't mind not having that stuff, they're content on their own just doing something that makes them happy. I don't think that's most people though.

Personally, I want to do something that makes me happy, gets the bills paid, and still leaves me plenty of room to buy and do what I want. Without money, you can't travel the world and experience some of the wonderful opportunities life has to offer.

Some would say capitalism enslaves, but alternatively you could say it gives you incentive to do something useful or contributive to others.

Passion > Money.

Most highpaying jobs are highpaying precisely because they eliminate a lot of the free time you have to do what your passionate about. Furthermore, you are taking a significant risk in that you might be able to retire early and pursue your passions only then (which I always found rather sad).

I guess part of the reasoning behind my choice is that I am also European. I like to travel but can do that relatively cheaply across the continent. Otherwise, most of my interests cost basically zero to sustain.


These sound like the sort of friendships and marriages that no right-thinking person would touch with a mile-long barge pole. I might understand if you only mean marriage in terms of paying for it, but that's well within the reach of the average person, who isn't as inclined to chase money.

Here you're much better off choosing the job you are passionate about anyways; you are more likely to bump into people you share interests with (which is much more important in the development of sustained relationships). The reason I am pursuing what I am pursuing has as much to do with connecting with people that interest me, as I am passionate about the field.

To be honest it's all relative.

But if I were to put an average guestimate on the dollar amount of annual NET INCOME (meaning after taxes both federal, state, etc.) that would satisfy most people/families to the point where passions become the priority, I would say it is around whatever $80,000-$120,000 USD, buys a family of 4-5, provided that the TRUE BUYING VALUE of that salary remains unchanged throughout time, and that that dollar number rate is earned at a constant level for 25 years.


In my opinion, that dollar level isn't filthy rich, but it places a family of that size in a stabilized place to afford a fixed mortgage, utilities, high-quality food and the potential to have higher quality bodies/development (which can lower individual healthcare costs) and in turn improve quality of life.


That's my idea of middle-class to be honest, and some would argue no that's wealthy, but given the rising cost of living in some areas, I'd argue no that's stable unless you want to live in an area that's at the mercy of consequences from big corporations or bad weather.


That salary also gives the opportunity for such a family to set aside some of that annual salary to be put aside for the parents eventual retirement, their future funeral expenses, emergency medical expenses, and a survivior's last will and testament, or to have a savings account to endure really bad economic times like the recent Recession we just had.


Lets also factor in that most families experience a major household device failure and expense to repair or replace every 3-8 years (cars, tires, washer, dryer, light bulbs, plumbing leaks, floor leaks, termites/pests, children jumping on the bed and breaking it and doing what kids do)


Each of those real world scenarios is easily a $200-$2000 dollar fix depending on what it is.


$80,000 - $120,000 a year seems like an adequate salary to handle the above common scenarios when you think about it broadly.

But again this is assuming the buying power of that amount remains at a constant of what it is now. Which is not reality, so my recommendation needs to be scaled up as time goes on, because what really matters is the ratio of value and utility, not the dollar amount.

---

What I'm seeing now though, is that society is pumping out now ON AVERAGE contract only jobs that are paying $45,000 and I think that causes a family to struggle at that point.

On a mass scale it explains the general sense of discontent in western societies and uneasiness in the growth rate at like 2%, with a constant fear of slipping back into Recession.

mrmee
December 30th, 2016, 01:06 AM
My first passion is cars, then computers are a close second. Luckily for me, there is always a demand for more IT guys and its a career that pays well. A mechanic does get a decent pay here in rural pennsylvania, but its nothing like an IT salary. My plan is to have my computer addiction pay for my motor addiction. Also, that way my passion for mechanics doesnt die from being forced to go to "work"

garfield221
January 5th, 2017, 03:25 PM
both would be a dream for everyone

NewLeafsFan
January 8th, 2017, 05:04 AM
Well it depends. Is your job your passion or is money your passion?

FPFanatic
January 8th, 2017, 02:28 PM
I'm not sure how much money I'd make doing what I love, but I think I might still do it anyways