PDA

View Full Version : Why are opiates legal?


Mina
December 19th, 2016, 02:44 AM
I might sound relli dumb but I was talking with my friends today n one of my good friends cousins in Alberta had to go to hospital because he overdose on fentanyl. She doesn't use drugs or her family but this cousin had some issues n made the choice he did. But she was so furious n kept saying Canada govt is shit cos they don't outright ban opiates n allow this drug to slip in from china without making border checks more strict.

This is relli a thinking topic n I don't really know what is officially the status of stuff like opiate or if it's legal or not as a painkillers or medicine in North America. I know in Europe though they dun use it half as much as over here - sorry if I sound so stupid but I wanna know more about it n maybe I can do work in the future to help ppl from being harmed.

Just JT
December 19th, 2016, 07:31 AM
Well mor all opoates are legal in North American. Basic stuff like Percocet or Vicodin are legal as painkillers prescribed by a legit doctor. They are addictive and can be a problem if someone stakes them for a long period of time. But they have a legit purpose in medicine, romreduce pain. Like in my case I've been on vicodine now on a regular for 3 weeks for a legit injury. And I'm worried about stopping.

But idk what my last 3 weeks woulda been like without those pills. The pain in horrible. But if people sell them on the street that's different

bentheplayer
December 19th, 2016, 08:27 AM
Cos Opiates are about the only stuff that can truly help reduce severe pain. However, those stuff are pretty addictive since they affect the nervous system. Long term use of opiates tend to lead to tolerance and dependency. Overdosing on opiates is dangerous cos it will result in respiratory depression ie you stop breathing.

I am sorry that you had to go thro that but yeah sadly fentanyl abuse is pretty common in Canada. In all honesty, I agree that these pill are a problem but most boarder agents don't really care abt meds unless it is an unusually large number. They usually assume its for personal consumption and that a prescription was already issued. The illicit drug market is too big to police anyway. All we can do is to watch out for each other and do our best to discourage such drug abuse.

Babs
December 19th, 2016, 08:24 PM
In North America, most if not all opiates are illegal for recreational use. However, they are incredibly useful for medicinal uses, which is no wonder why it's legal if you have a prescription.

Hermes
December 19th, 2016, 08:53 PM
Fentanyl is a prescription drug so it is prescribed to someone by his doctor because the doctor thinks he has a need for it, usually because he has such severe pain that it is the only think that works. Would you have preferred the doctor to tell him that he'll just have to suffer because opiates are too dangerous? It's probably a bit hard to judge that without being in his position.

Opiates are dangerous but they are also the most powerful painkillers yet discovered. Doctors will, of course, try something safer first, especially if the patient is to take them in the community rather than under medical supervision but if someone has chronic severe pain it is not reasonable to expect him to give up his freedom to stay in hospital while on painkillers, or to suffer in pain.

Mina
December 20th, 2016, 04:03 PM
Yea but there r safer alternatives. Like I said in Europe they don't use half as many as we do on this side of the world n don't have nearly as many fatalities cos of that stuff either

bentheplayer
December 21st, 2016, 10:12 AM
What alternatives are there Mina cos from what I understand there isn't really any painkillers that work as well as opiates?

Fatalities from opiates due to abuse is akin to fatality from an overdose on illegal drugs. These drugs are meant to be taken under the supervision of a competent and ethical doctor so that the pain can be well controlled while not killing the patient.

There are many reasons to explain the big difference in use of opiates among the developed countries. Pain management has always been a bigger issue in USA and with patients paying they will easily vote with their money and choose a doc who is more willing to treat the pain aggressively. In Europe, most countries have social healthcare provided by the government and the doctors there might be more conservative in morphine use. The use of opiates in Europe is also somewhat frowned upon by society too and patients might be more willing to accept more pain.

You might want to read this article by the economist. http://www.economist.com/news/international/21699363-americans-are-increasingly-addicted-opioids-meanwhile-people-poor-countries-die

To me, the main issue in North America is just simply the black market for opiates and not about the legality of opiates use. Somehow or other, enforcement is simply too weak.

Just JT
December 21st, 2016, 10:36 AM
North America has an opiate addiction. Over doses and deaths related to opiates are incredibly high. And that's from the abuse of the drugs. If used in the proper way, addiction is far less likely. But possible. Yes there isn't much or anything else that better than an opiate for pain right now. But when you consider the level of pain, and risk of possible addiction, the patient need to make a personal choice and weigh the pros and cons of using the pain meds or not. And suffer the consequences of that decision what ever that is.

I don't like drugs of any kinds. And I'm on a good amount of prescription meds myself. Don think like that. But I dislike more what I am like without them. And so do the adults in my life

It's a double edge sword I think. But if used properly, prescribed by a legit dr, taken as prescribed, you should be fine. Just don't take them for ever or something. Cause then there's a problem

PunkModRevial
December 28th, 2016, 11:14 PM
They're legal because when used "correctly" they are incredibly powerful and useful pain medications; you can't keep someone from feeling alright after a major surgery by giving them a couple of Tylenols or Advils.

bentheplayer
December 30th, 2016, 09:54 AM
Here is the best explanation for pain killers abuse in USA that I found so far. Its an interesting read.
http://blog.sermo.com/2016/12/29/federal-government-made-mess/

Hermes
December 30th, 2016, 12:41 PM
Here is the best explanation for pain killers abuse in USA that I found so far. Its an interesting read.
http://blog.sermo.com/2016/12/29/federal-government-made-mess/

That's a very interesting article. On the question of the popularity contest you can see why rich people with private physicians can end up where they do and I am thinking, for example of Michael Jackson. Someone in his position would be used to getting what he wants and may well be prepared to sack any physician who won't give him what he wants. So soon enough he ends up with someone who is either poor enough, or greedy enough, to put money before professional judgement.

But none of this is an argument as to why they should be banned. Rather, it is an argument for using proportionate treatment for pain according to sound professional judgement.

bentheplayer
December 30th, 2016, 11:58 PM
That's a very interesting article. On the question of the popularity contest you can see why rich people with private physicians can end up where they do and I am thinking, for example of Michael Jackson. Someone in his position would be used to getting what he wants and may well be prepared to sack any physician who won't give him what he wants. So soon enough he ends up with someone who is either poor enough, or greedy enough, to put money before professional judgement.

But none of this is an argument as to why they should be banned. Rather, it is an argument for using proportionate treatment for pain according to sound professional judgement.

Actually I meant it to be an explanation of how opiates are useful for pain management but is legally allowed to be "abused" from the top down (physicians) which fuels such addiction. There are already guidelines on the use of opiates in America but they are rarely followed due to reasons like what the article mentioned. If people do not get hooked on opiates there won't such a huge demand in the black market.

My point was that opiates should not be banned but should have tighter control to prevent such abuse that causes people to question the legality of opiates. I apologize for not making my point clear but then I am pretty lazy with speech.