PDA

View Full Version : The 6 mistakes that students make when studying


devotionnel
December 12th, 2016, 11:50 AM
Today in school we had this revision workshop and I found that it was really helpful so I thought I'd regurgitate it back in here since I found the workshop very helpful :)
Lost Horizon I'm sure you'd like this for your GCSEs. :')

1. You don't give enough time for revision
It's shown that average-scoring students underestimate the amount of work they need to revise and they overestimate the amount of time they've got left until the exam. It's shown that students need at least a month of resourceful revision coming up to the exam.

2. You do the wrong kind of work
Yes, there is a wrong kind of revision that a student can do. There are lots of different types of revision under the sun, but it doesn't mean that all of these types work for every student! For example, someone who is very reliant on mind maps may find this not useful for them and as a result they don't gain any benefits from studying this way.

3. You have no revision plan
Sticking to a strict revision guideline in the coming weeks to your exam can be sooo much more beneficial for the students than reading a textbook every now and again when you feel like it. Getting into the routine can help you get into the productive mood needed for revision and it can help set deadlines and goals which will boost productivity.

4. You never learn from your revision mistakes
It's shown that lesser scoring students will throw the badly scoring test away almost ceremoniously and they continue to make these mistakes without following them up! Seeing where you've gone wrong is the most proactive way to going forwards and fine tuning the techniques you use.

5. You have no goals
Having a set goal in your mind, i.e. 'I want to get an A on this paper' or 'I want to attain the grades I need for these subjects in order to get into my course for sixth-form/college/university' can be a great way to motivate students in order to push themselves further in order to get their dream goal that they want to get on results day. Without these goals, revision may seem meaningless, and the student wouldn't feel determined to study.

6. Never doing enough practice papers
The speaker at the workshop today said that he'd spoken to a student in Australia who was marked in the top 0.5% of the country, and the way he managed to attain that high score was through practice papers! Average scoring students think that 1 or 2 practice papers would be sufficient as revision, but applying the prior revision to an abundance of practice papers up to 2 weeks before the exam can show that you can apply your revision to exam-style questions. When marking the papers (especially maths and physics, where it is strictly correct/incorrect answers for every question) you can clearly identify weaker points and push more revision into these areas in order to close the gap.

Now, 5 quick steps for doing well:

1. Give yourself adequate time to prepare for the exam - only 20% of the exam result lies on the performance on the day of the exam, the other 80% is reliant on exam preparation and revision! Scary, right?
2. Go through past papers and identify where you lost marks - students should identify where the marks were lost and correct them accordingly.
3. Get teachers advice - the trick to this is asking specifically where you lost marks and where you can gain marks. This is especially good for lessons where you have to write essays, such as English and Religious Studies. Other types can include 6 or 8 mark questions in other general subjects.
4. Learn from the people around you - especially for use in high mark questions or essays. Get answers from someone higher than you in your class, or a set above you (if applicable) and copy where their stronger points are, like a better structure than yours. Model answers from exam boards or mark schemes would also do the trick.
5. Fix the mistakes - in a past paper where you have gone wrong, redo these questions where you could improve and re-mark these questions to see if you have improved.

I hope this helps someone :)

Endeavour
December 12th, 2016, 12:40 PM
Funnily enough, we also had a revision and interview skills workshop today. :)

Oh my Shanie this is so useful! Thanks for sharing this :)

I know I find exam papers quite useful. One thing that I learned from my Biology teacher a few weeks ago is take one topic at a time (let's say, homeostasis), revise that, then find a question from an exam paper that has that topic, then mark it.

Another thing that I found useful in most subjects (the only subject where this doesn't really work is English) is to go on the exam board's website, find the specification, then every now and again mark all the points as red/amber/green so you can track your progress.

Trevor.
December 29th, 2016, 02:44 AM
Today in school we had this revision workshop and I found that it was really helpful so I thought I'd regurgitate it back in here since I found the workshop very helpful :)
Lost Horizon I'm sure you'd like this for your GCSEs. :')

1. You don't give enough time for revision
It's shown that average-scoring students underestimate the amount of work they need to revise and they overestimate the amount of time they've got left until the exam. It's shown that students need at least a month of resourceful revision coming up to the exam.

2. You do the wrong kind of work
Yes, there is a wrong kind of revision that a student can do. There are lots of different types of revision under the sun, but it doesn't mean that all of these types work for every student! For example, someone who is very reliant on mind maps may find this not useful for them and as a result they don't gain any benefits from studying this way.

3. You have no revision plan
Sticking to a strict revision guideline in the coming weeks to your exam can be sooo much more beneficial for the students than reading a textbook every now and again when you feel like it. Getting into the routine can help you get into the productive mood needed for revision and it can help set deadlines and goals which will boost productivity.

4. You never learn from your revision mistakes
It's shown that lesser scoring students will throw the badly scoring test away almost ceremoniously and they continue to make these mistakes without following them up! Seeing where you've gone wrong is the most proactive way to going forwards and fine tuning the techniques you use.

5. You have no goals
Having a set goal in your mind, i.e. 'I want to get an A on this paper' or 'I want to attain the grades I need for these subjects in order to get into my course for sixth-form/college/university' can be a great way to motivate students in order to push themselves further in order to get their dream goal that they want to get on results day. Without these goals, revision may seem meaningless, and the student wouldn't feel determined to study.

6. Never doing enough practice papers
The speaker at the workshop today said that he'd spoken to a student in Australia who was marked in the top 0.5% of the country, and the way he managed to attain that high score was through practice papers! Average scoring students think that 1 or 2 practice papers would be sufficient as revision, but applying the prior revision to an abundance of practice papers up to 2 weeks before the exam can show that you can apply your revision to exam-style questions. When marking the papers (especially maths and physics, where it is strictly correct/incorrect answers for every question) you can clearly identify weaker points and push more revision into these areas in order to close the gap.

Now, 5 quick steps for doing well:

1. Give yourself adequate time to prepare for the exam - only 20% of the exam result lies on the performance on the day of the exam, the other 80% is reliant on exam preparation and revision! Scary, right?
2. Go through past papers and identify where you lost marks - students should identify where the marks were lost and correct them accordingly.
3. Get teachers advice - the trick to this is asking specifically where you lost marks and where you can gain marks. This is especially good for lessons where you have to write essays, such as English and Religious Studies. Other types can include 6 or 8 mark questions in other general subjects.
4. Learn from the people around you - especially for use in high mark questions or essays. Get answers from someone higher than you in your class, or a set above you (if applicable) and copy where their stronger points are, like a better structure than yours. Model answers from exam boards or mark schemes would also do the trick.
5. Fix the mistakes - in a past paper where you have gone wrong, redo these questions where you could improve and re-mark these questions to see if you have improved.

I hope this helps someone :)

OMG THANKS.... I really needed this and I think it help me A LOT. People should post more stuff like this :)