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Microcosm
October 26th, 2016, 08:45 PM
Basically, I'd like to know if anyone has any information about potential career paths for philanthropic careers, and by that I mean work in which you travel the world, help communities and need, and get paid for it; sort of like a volunteer traveler but not just a volunteer.

I've been looking into this and I'm not sure. The best bet seems to be as a human resources officer or something like that.

Vlerchan
October 27th, 2016, 04:16 AM
I recall a talk I attended where the speaker worked for an international development organisation as something like a recourse manager - with a focus on Northern India and the general area adjacent. Her background was South Asian History and Urdu from a prestigious undergraduate - and a masters in something similar. But what she said was most beneficial is that she had also learned a number of the minor regional languages that there was a lack of in the industry.

She suggested that those interested in a career in it start engaging in home-based charitable endeavours now. Like work with the homeless or something. Because that's a strong signal you care about the issues - and aren't just in it for the free travel.

LinkedIn is your bestfriend here though - search for people with similar employment - because it's doubtful there'll be a huge amount on VT with experience on the matter. I'm not sure if the above is that typical but being as it is a highly competitive space I wouldn't be surprised if it was close.

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Note: If you just want to travel become a teacher in a private school or something (aim for the cream to get the cream) - getting a PhD in English would be the best route that you could take, given what I've read of your interests elsewhere in this subforum.

Microcosm
October 27th, 2016, 04:20 PM
I recall a talk I attended where the speaker worked for an international development organisation as something like a recourse manager - with a focus on Northern India and the general area adjacent. Her background was South Asian History and Urdu from a prestigious undergraduate - and a masters in something similar. But what she said was most beneficial is that she had also learned a number of the minor regional languages that there was a lack of in the industry.

She suggested that those interested in a career in it start engaging in home-based charitable endeavours now. Like work with the homeless or something. Because that's a strong signal you care about the issues - and aren't just in it for the free travel.

LinkedIn is your bestfriend here though - search for people with similar employment - because it's doubtful there'll be a huge amount on VT with experience on the matter. I'm not sure if the above is that typical but being as it is a highly competitive space I wouldn't be surprised if it was close.

---

Note: If you just want to travel become a teacher in a private school or something (aim for the cream to get the cream) - getting a PhD in English would be the best route that you could take, given what I've read of your interests elsewhere in this subforum.

Thanks for the response.

Love of traveling isn't necessarily the only motivation, although it is a contributing factor. What I'd really like to do is be on the front lines of communities with social or political problems (basically anything but dealing with their medical problems) and try to provide resources and insight to solve those problems. That seems like a very fulfilling career, but I can't pinpoint what route to take to do that.

I'm considering going to Soka University and getting a Liberal Arts Degree with a concentration in International Studies. That seems like a good start, although such lack of specialization I would think might make finding a steady career difficult in the future.

Also, the point that speaker made on languages is interesting as I also have an interest in learning new languages. I do believe I could learn those sorts of regional dialects.

Vlerchan
October 29th, 2016, 02:28 PM
What I'd really like to do is be on the front lines of communities with social or political problems (basically anything but dealing with their medical problems) and try to provide resources and insight to solve those problems. That seems like a very fulfilling career, but I can't pinpoint what route to take to do that.
This sounds like what an AID or Relief worker does. From just thinking about what those jobs typically require, it would probably be advisable to minor (or double-major) in something practical such as business-logistics. I would presume your aim is to eventually get to project manager but I can only imagine it is going to be a serious grind to get there, during which your ability to engage practically with the situation is what will be counted on.

Your theoretical background will then become of increased use as you progress, I'd imagine. But then, it should be noted that with zero experience in the field, I am just imagining here - the earlier advice is based on someone else's actual experiences in the field.

Muddy Sneakers
November 17th, 2016, 09:20 PM
We had a speaker come to school telling about careers in the NGO - non-governmental organizations - world and it sounded like there were a ton of jobs there. You can be a program manager who helps with refugees, or providing medical care or teaching better farming etc. I don't think you have to specialize in "charitable studies" since there are so many careers you can have in the non-profit world.