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View Full Version : In some parts of America it is still illegal to sell alcohol


PlexiGlassXD
September 14th, 2016, 05:20 AM
https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/s--d-y_Gvfh--/c_fit,fl_progressive,q_80,w_636/17hbn7wtdyak1jpg.jpg

I don't drink but I can't believe there are still places in America where alcohol can't be sold. I think this is ridiculous.

The red and yellow are certainly not the values of the blue moderate suburban majority!

The counties in blue are not Somalia esq wastelands!

Dalcourt
September 14th, 2016, 06:17 AM
This information you provide doesn't really tell me anything and I'm not in the mood to google it so if you want a discussion about anything I guess you should provide a little more "flesh" for it.

Mars
September 14th, 2016, 07:07 AM
....so?

Periphery
September 14th, 2016, 07:15 AM
PlexiGlassXD Sources?

PlasmaHam
September 14th, 2016, 07:22 AM
^I'll attempt to explain.
This map divides America into counties, and talks about alcohol regulations in such counties.

Blue counties have no restrictions on alcohol sales, you can buy alcohol basically whenever and wherever you want.

Yellow counties have some restrictions on alcohol sales, certain places and times have alcohol banned, but you can buy alcohol at legal places and time periods.

Red counties completely prohibit the sale of alcohol, or at least heavily regulate it. Buying alcohol out of the county and bringing it in is fine though.

I really don't see the problem with this. Local people voted in regulation regarding alcohol, and if you don't like it, then move to another county. The ability to get stone drunk is not a right the Founding Fathers were too worried about. I actually live in a yellow county, and it is mainly suburbs, with a major city as the county seat. The restrictions on alcohol are simply you can't buy any late at night, and certain holidays have restricted time periods. You really don't hear people talk about it much, and it is perfectly legal for counties or even states to regulate alcohol sales in such a way.

Who cares if your local community doesn't agree with your so called "Blue moderate suburban majority?" The people of a county or state, have the right to vote in basically whatever legislation they like, regardless of whether the majority of outside Americans like it. That's the way America works. And unless you count the majority of North Carolina, one of the fastest growing states and oldest states, as a Somalia esq wasteland, I suggest you rethink your earlier comments.

Dalcourt
September 14th, 2016, 08:37 AM
^I'll attempt to explain.
This map divides America into counties, and talks about alcohol regulations in such counties.

Blue counties have no restrictions on alcohol sales, you can buy alcohol basically whenever and wherever you want.

Yellow counties have some restrictions on alcohol sales, certain places and times have alcohol banned, but you can buy alcohol at legal places and time periods.

Red counties completely prohibit the sale of alcohol, or at least heavily regulate it. Buying alcohol out of the county and bringing it in is fine though.

I really don't see the problem with this. Local people voted in regulation regarding alcohol, and if you don't like it, then move to another county. The ability to get stone drunk is not a right the Founding Fathers were too worried about. I actually live in a yellow county, and it is mainly suburbs, with a major city as the county seat. The restrictions on alcohol are simply you can't buy any late at night, and certain holidays have restricted time periods. You really don't hear people talk about it much, and it is perfectly legal for counties or even states to regulate alcohol sales in such a way.

Who cares if your local community doesn't agree with your so called "Blue moderate suburban majority?" The people of a county or state, have the right to vote in basically whatever legislation they like, regardless of whether the majority of outside Americans like it. That's the way America works. And unless you count the majority of North Carolina, one of the fastest growing states and oldest states, as a Somalia esq wasteland, I suggest you rethink your earlier comments.


Well yeah, I know about the restrictions and alcohol sales laws in the different counties or where I live parishes. Some of the parts in our state are the yellow ones and it was never seen as a big deal by anyone there.
I live in a blue are and in our case this means really no restrictions at all so locals just don't go with their families in certain areas of the city to avoid drunk tourists who certainly overdo it here a lot.
But since drunk tourists mean a lot of money authorities are fine with it.


So my problem here is just what the OP wants people to discuss here about since this first post doesn't really make much sense in my opinion.

Flapjack
September 14th, 2016, 10:54 AM
I think regulating alcohol is stupid and inconveniences the people however I think it is very low down on America's problems atm though :P Still though it is an easy fix and they should make it legal.

Uranus
September 14th, 2016, 11:08 AM
Yet weeds legal in Colorado and a few other states wtf America

Vlerchan
September 14th, 2016, 11:11 AM
If you have that big an issue, you can vote with your feet and leave.

I have no issue with the localisation of social policy though, anyways.

Karkat
September 14th, 2016, 11:29 AM
I have to disagree with this map to some extent. Alcohol is pretty heavily regulated in Utah. Even in bars, where you have to buy food in order to buy alcohol. You can only buy beer in stores as well as SOME wine coolers/etc- you can't even get the two-buck chuck at Trader Joe's! (Darn)

Maybe I'm misinterpreting what the map means, but honestly, Utah is pretty strict on their alcohol sales.

Arkansasguy
September 14th, 2016, 12:01 PM
image (https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/s--d-y_Gvfh--/c_fit,fl_progressive,q_80,w_636/17hbn7wtdyak1jpg.jpg)

I don't drink but I can't believe there are still places in America where alcohol can't be sold. I think this is ridiculous.

The red and yellow are certainly not the values of the blue moderate suburban majority!

The counties in blue are not Somalia esq wastelands!

Saline County is wet now. Your map is outdated.

Stronk Serb
September 14th, 2016, 12:35 PM
Remember when they imposed alcohol regulations in Belgrade... they removed it because it was hurting retail stores and alcohol delivery by a lot.

Professional Russian
September 14th, 2016, 12:44 PM
I think it's funny that Lynchburg, Tennesse, home of my.man jack daniels, is a dry county. but there's a loophole. if you buy a whole barrel of jack it's legal...guess who's going Tennessee when he turns 21? dis guy

mattsmith48
September 14th, 2016, 01:46 PM
I think regulating alcohol is stupid and inconveniences the people however I think it is very low down on America's problems atm though :P Still though it is an easy fix and they should make it legal.

Well you need some regulation on alcohol like anything that is potentially harmfull to your body. Banning it is stupid tho

Yet weeds legal in Colorado and a few other states wtf America

Well the 4 states where weed is legal have no restrictions on the selling of alcohol. And weed is less harfull than alcohol I don't see any problem there.

azure moonstone
September 14th, 2016, 01:51 PM
Blue laws on alcohol - dry counties, no sales on Sundays, limited sales after "church hours" on Sundays - is such an archaic concept. This was probably a better thought out idea in the 1800s when everyone and their cousins were herding off to church and browbeaten about how they were going to hell over everything. In 2016, not really much to this other than "we're going to piss away local income from alcohol sales because we still want to live in the 19th century and chant bible quotes at everyone."

Porpoise101
September 14th, 2016, 03:21 PM
Blue laws on alcohol - dry counties, no sales on Sundays, limited sales after "church hours" on Sundays - is such an archaic concept. This was probably a better thought out idea in the 1800s when everyone and their cousins were herding off to church and browbeaten about how they were going to hell over everything. In 2016, not really much to this other than "we're going to piss away local income from alcohol sales because we still want to live in the 19th century and chant bible quotes at everyone."
Blue laws are definitely part of it. In the south they also have it because they want to regulate the alcohol industry a lot more. Not moonshine, but I am talking about whiskey, bourbon, etc. It is actually a holdover from when the South voted Democrat and it was cool to be progressive down there.

PlasmaHam
September 14th, 2016, 03:59 PM
Blue laws on alcohol - dry counties, no sales on Sundays, limited sales after "church hours" on Sundays - is such an archaic concept. This was probably a better thought out idea in the 1800s when everyone and their cousins were herding off to church and browbeaten about how they were going to hell over everything. In 2016, not really much to this other than "we're going to piss away local income from alcohol sales because we still want to live in the 19th century and chant bible quotes at everyone."
You really need to come down to the South for once. I mean really to the South, not the Northern controlled Florida. There is a reason there isn't northern hospitality. Anyway, most of these laws regarding dry counties, actually came after Prohibition, which encase you didn't know, was in the early 1900s. I see nothing wrong or really religiously motivated to prevent people from buying a drug at certain times. No one needs to be buying alcohol in the middle of the night, nothing good comes from that. And living in the South, the only people you ever hear complaining about it are angry Yankees on the internet.

I just like having social policy and regulation focused at the state and local level. If a county votes to prohibit alcohol, then by all means they should be able to do it. If a state wants enforce common sense, then by all means they should be able to. If you have a problem with it, there are plenty of other places you can go

Vlerchan
September 14th, 2016, 04:07 PM
No one needs to be buying alcohol in the middle of the night, nothing good comes from that.
Barring people from purchasing alcohol in the middle of the night probably encourages them to over-stock during the day if they're having a party, or whatever*.

I'd actually be really interested in what effects restrictions like that have on alcohol purchases during the day. Must find some studies.

---

* The single consequence I see it as having is killing the nightclub industry which might not be a bad thing.

azure moonstone
September 14th, 2016, 04:23 PM
You really need to come down to the South for once. I mean really to the South, not the Northern controlled Florida.

I'm actually originally from southern Louisiana, but now live in the Carolinas (not Florida).

And living in the South, the only people you ever hear complaining about it are angry Yankees on the internet.

I guess I'm the exception then, or you're speaking for a lot more people in the southeast than you have a right to. I don't want to live with laws that prohibit sales of alcohol, or limit them to certain days. Just an opinion, is all.

I just like having social policy and regulation focused at the state and local level. If a county votes to prohibit alcohol, then by all means they should be able to do it. If a state wants enforce common sense, then by all means they should be able to.

I agree with this, though once again - I feel it's stupid and outdated. It's not a case of hospitality or "being southern." It's refusing to let go of "what mawmaw done" and moving forward with the rest of the country.

And LOL @ "common sense." That's also an opinion, just like mine.

If you have a problem with it, there are plenty of other places you can go

:lol: forever - we're pretty much neighbors with different opinions, that's all. Keep living in 1955, dude.

jamie_n5
September 14th, 2016, 08:40 PM
There are some dry counties and cities and areas in the United States. Most are down south and some areas of Alaska are dry too. Also some scattered about the country.

pconnor2001
September 14th, 2016, 09:05 PM
Utah is heavily Mormon. The Mormon religion prohibits alcohol. This is a good clue as to why alcohol sales are so strictly regulated in Utah.

Dalcourt
September 15th, 2016, 10:22 PM
You really need to come down to the South for once. I mean really to the South, not the Northern controlled Florida.

Sorry off topic but I always find your expression of coming down to the South so incredibly hilarious....if I wanted to visit your South I'd have to go way up North same as lots of other true Southern people and we are all different and there isn't just "the South" so I really hate that cliché.

Now what I really wante to say. I just read this article while browsing the internet looking for more information on alcohol laws

http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottbeyer/2016/03/29/a-tale-of-two-alcohol-laws-new-orleans-and-oklahoma-city/#7281f4181ac2

Sorry for the nasty link but it was kinda interesting.

PinkFloyd
September 15th, 2016, 10:56 PM
^I'll attempt to explain.
This map divides America into counties, and talks about alcohol regulations in such counties.

Blue counties have no restrictions on alcohol sales, you can buy alcohol basically whenever and wherever you want.

Yellow counties have some restrictions on alcohol sales, certain places and times have alcohol banned, but you can buy alcohol at legal places and time periods.

Red counties completely prohibit the sale of alcohol, or at least heavily regulate it. Buying alcohol out of the county and bringing it in is fine though.

I really don't see the problem with this. Local people voted in regulation regarding alcohol, and if you don't like it, then move to another county. The ability to get stone drunk is not a right the Founding Fathers were too worried about. I actually live in a yellow county, and it is mainly suburbs, with a major city as the county seat. The restrictions on alcohol are simply you can't buy any late at night, and certain holidays have restricted time periods. You really don't hear people talk about it much, and it is perfectly legal for counties or even states to regulate alcohol sales in such a way.

Who cares if your local community doesn't agree with your so called "Blue moderate suburban majority?" The people of a county or state, have the right to vote in basically whatever legislation they like, regardless of whether the majority of outside Americans like it. That's the way America works. And unless you count the majority of North Carolina, one of the fastest growing states and oldest states, as a Somalia esq wasteland, I suggest you rethink your earlier comments.

It's funny this discussion was brought up because just yesterday, my geography professor was talking about dry states throughout the south. He said it has to do with all the strict Baptists in the area. He the nwent on to say how people would go to the blue counties, buy forties, and cruise around their dry county drinking a shit ton of booze. That's how it was in the early 90s when he was in high school. Is that at all true today?

Bull
September 16th, 2016, 06:23 AM
Liquor regulation is the bootlegger's dream come true. According to my grandfather it was much easier for underage kids to get booze in Oklahoma when it was illegal. Bootleggers didn't have to check id. lol My roommate discovered over the summer that it is illegal to sell Jack Daniels Whiskey (my personal favorite) in the Tennessee County where it is distilled. Go figure!