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Porpoise101
September 12th, 2016, 08:44 PM
Why do we still go through the painful ritual of national self-pity. I believe it is important to let the dead rest. Maybe a reflection, but the way the US treats 9-11 is too far in my opinion. Now it seems you are a treacherous individual if you even hint at the idea that it is time to let go a little bit. I think it is important to remember the past, but you shouldn't risk shoving it down people's throats. Otherwise it becomes like the Holocaust, a tragedy that many think is a joke because of a mix of prejudice and institutional acceptance/PC attitudes. Cynics have even made "it's too soon" a joke. If this event is treated so seriously and sacredly, cynics will just defile it down the road. That is something I do not want.

StoppingTom
September 12th, 2016, 08:51 PM
In my experience, at least, a lot of the people I know have some kind of connection to the WTC/people who work there/were in the city at the time, so that's why people make it a big deal here (I'm a New Yorker so my viewpoint is different)

Drewboyy
September 12th, 2016, 08:56 PM
I was just born when 9/11 happened so it doesn't make me feel anything (I have friends who were directly effected by it) but you could just feel the uneasiness coming out of everyone walking the streets of Manhattan while the massive monument is just overwhelming everyone below on Sunday. But you know, that's just a New Yorker speaking

ThisBougieLife
September 12th, 2016, 10:40 PM
I do enjoy me a good 9/11 joke on the occasion.

Flapjack
September 13th, 2016, 01:27 AM
There are already loads of people joking about 9-11 buddy. I think we should stop politicising it, using it to justify wars and respect the dead.

Paraxiom
September 13th, 2016, 06:37 AM
I likely have quite outlying views on 9/11 and related events/situations, but I don't have to talk about them to agree that the persistent relationship of the US population with e.g. the old WTC is like simultaneously an unofficial moratorium and an obsession.

Direct reference to e.g. the towers or the victims can and has been met with bitter reactions as though people don't want to talk about it ever, but yet the same event keeps being talked about never being forgotten. Can people not come to terms with it in some consistent way?

It did not surprise me that a video titled Top 10 Craziest Events Caught Live on TV [ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLVSN9Q3toc ] has 9/11 as its #1 event.

How exactly is the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami, the invasion of Iraq, a Syrian chemical attack in August 2013, or (my favourite) the US themselves dropping two atomic bombs on two Japanese cities, each not worse than 9/11?

Aiming to permanently remember an event does not at all mean doing what a lot of the US does with 9/11, in my view at least. It's distorted, to say the least.

mattsmith48
September 13th, 2016, 10:35 AM
I agree, yes it was a tragic event that happen 15 years ago and its horrible that so many people died that day, but get over it. When you murder the guy responsible for this, you should have moved on. Its alright to have small ceremony locally where the attacks happen but not the big thing that it as become.

Remora
September 13th, 2016, 10:41 AM
As someone who celebrates 9/11 (don't take that out of context) because it is my birthday, I was sent out of class by my English teacher because i told someone i'd become 16 that day and she overheard it. She appeared extremely offended and told me how it was extremely disrespectful of me to celebrate my birthday on that day. This all was in the Netherlands.

There's only 365 days in a year so to have to dedicate one of those precious days entirely to something that happened a while ago, but it's... uh, agitating, to say the least, to keep getting told i'm disrespectful solemly because i was born on a certain date.

I also agree with Matt in that it should be reduced to a small and local ceremony for those that lost loved ones in the event. I don't want to be a part of it anymore.

PlasmaHam
September 13th, 2016, 11:21 AM
If people want to commemorate 9/11, then please do. Its not everyday that 3000 innocent people die a horrible death in one of the biggest cities and nations in the Western world. Commemorating 9/11 is in my opinion not just 9/11, but as a commemoration of all those lost in terror attacks, and the war on terror. Sorta like how Veterans day in America evolved out of a celebration of WWI victory, and now it is for honoring all those who have fought in all wars. No one forces you to take part in it, and it isn't something grand like Thanksgiving, but 9/11 is a good day to honor those who have been victims of rising terror attacks.

History may be behind us, but as the old saying goes, those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.

Paraxiom
September 13th, 2016, 02:07 PM
As someone who celebrates 9/11 (don't take that out of context) because it is my birthday, I was sent out of class by my English teacher because i told someone i'd become 16 that day and she overheard it. She appeared extremely offended and told me how it was extremely disrespectful of me to celebrate my birthday on that day. This all was in the Netherlands.

There's only 365 days in a year so to have to dedicate one of those precious days entirely to something that happened a while ago, but it's... uh, agitating, to say the least, to keep getting told i'm disrespectful solemly because i was born on a certain date.


:/ That's something I haven't heard before.

Dalcourt
September 13th, 2016, 03:24 PM
I understand that for New Yorkers 9/11 is a date they will always remember and as so many people there were affected by what happened directly it's not so easy to "just get over it and move on". So telling them not to make such a big deal out of it is just not fair. Some things just change a place forever somehow. (Even if it's something completely different it was kinda the same feeling here where I live with hurricane Katrina)

For the rest of the country it's more or less a symbol for our vulnerability. Just a handful of fanatics was all it took to hit the USA that hard. So even a nation that felt always like a superpower can be so easily harmed. How would this fact so easily be dealt with? This sudden notion of vulnerability started a war on terrorism that can never be won but 9/11 helps to justify it again each year.
So to just stop making it so big is just not possible.

jamie_n5
September 14th, 2016, 09:06 PM
Well we still remember December 7th and Pearl Harbor to this day too. When a nation suffers a horrific event like Pearl Harbor and 9/11 people remember it and it isn't so much political. It is to remember and honor the dead. We have the Arizona Memorial in Hawaii and now the 9/11 Memorial in New York to honor the fallen and respect them. Hiroshima in Japan also has a memorial remembering and honoring their dead from the atomic bombings. I think it is way that countries remember the tragedies and honor the fallen. Politics really plays no real part in these memorials.

PlasmaHam
September 14th, 2016, 09:15 PM
I feel that as people who have grown up under the shadow of 9/11, most of us don't really see the true tragedy it was. None of us were able to understand 9/11 when it happened, yet we have heard of it so often, that we have gone numb to it's effects. The generation before us experienced 9/11, and the generations after us will no longer see 9/11 as just another terror attack, but as an event of historical importance, marking a major milestone in American history. Living in the shadow of 9/11 blurs our perspective, and that what our generation is in.

Stronk Serb
September 15th, 2016, 01:04 AM
As someone who celebrates 9/11 (don't take that out of context) because it is my birthday, I was sent out of class by my English teacher because i told someone i'd become 16 that day and she overheard it. She appeared extremely offended and told me how it was extremely disrespectful of me to celebrate my birthday on that day. This all was in the Netherlands.

There's only 365 days in a year so to have to dedicate one of those precious days entirely to something that happened a while ago, but it's... uh, agitating, to say the least, to keep getting told i'm disrespectful solemly because i was born on a certain date.

I also agree with Matt in that it should be reduced to a small and local ceremony for those that lost loved ones in the event. I don't want to be a part of it anymore.

Yet they celebrate the first of September by sending us all back to school, even though it's the day WWII started.

Bloo
September 15th, 2016, 03:43 AM
I think it's up to people to be as emotional or to grieve/mourn over something for as long and as much as they want.

As someone who lives in Chicago, a major US city and financial center, 9/11 is very close to my heart, because it could have been is, it could have been the Willis/Seers tower, or the Aon center, or any other building, they were/are very possible targets.

But an important fact, 9/11 was the largest single attack on innocent civilians since World War II. I think for the most part, the world wrote off World War II as a dark period for the world, and have forgotten tragedy. But to relate it to the US atomic bombings is kind of a false comparison. By no means am I justifying it, but for the most part, it was two countries in total war that attacked eachother, that doesn't make it warranted, but it is just war (some even argue the atomic bombings would go on to saves hundreds of thousands of lives to the world by demonstrating the power of atomic bombs. It is probably the only reason the world wasn't destroyed in the Cold War). When it comes to 9/11, there was not war, and for the most part was completely unexpected/unwarranted (unwarranted isn't the right word, but I can't think of a better one).

Speaking for myself, 9/11 is still super sensitive and sad subject for me. But many things are. I'll never forget November 13th (the series of attacks that took place on November 13th, 2015), or the Charlie Hebdo attacks, both of which took place in my home town of Paris.

All of these attacks were premeditated, ruthless attacks on the countries I love, fellow citizens, and the beliefs and ideals I hold. I can't get over them, and I don't think there will be a time when I can not should. That said, I'm not going to chastise someone if they aren't mourning or grieving, or make a joke, I've laughed at a joke or two myself.

ALL THAT SAID,
I think people are starting to move on, in 2009 congress made 9/11 "National Day of Service and Rememberence" where it is encouraged that Americans do something positive to help others and their communities, to bring light to the day and the tragedy.

(Also, sorry this is really long).