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View Full Version : Was Christopher Columbus a hero?


Kawaii Bean
August 30th, 2016, 12:42 PM
Was he or was he not?

Flapjack
August 30th, 2016, 12:44 PM
No quite simply :)
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This sums up why pretty well :)

ThisBougieLife
August 30th, 2016, 12:49 PM
No, I wouldn't say so, but few would probably consider him to be so.

It's important to study the difference he made in history, but I don't feel any particular reverence for him.

Dalcourt
August 30th, 2016, 12:56 PM
He had a huge impact on our history but that alone doesn't make him a hero.

jamie_n5
August 30th, 2016, 02:31 PM
No I don't think so. He accidently stumbled upon the New World. Modern history has proven that he was not the true person that discovered America anyway.

SethfromMI
August 30th, 2016, 02:35 PM
no. he had a big impact on history, in some ways, some of us benefit from today, but Columbus and his men did unspeakable crimes to the natives. down right, unspeakable horrors. not a hero at all

Periphery
August 30th, 2016, 02:36 PM
What's funny is he didn't even discover the mainland of America and the amount of people who don't know is actually surprisingly high.

SethfromMI
August 30th, 2016, 02:39 PM
What's funny is he didn't even discover the mainland of America and the amount of people who don't know is actually surprisingly high.

it is pretty sad. it is not always clearly defined/taught in a lot of schools (or wasn't when I was in elementary). in fact, I never learned of some of his crimes until I took a college level history class in high school

Porpoise101
August 30th, 2016, 03:01 PM
Hmm. I think that he was an ambitious and capable man at the very least. He was an Italian who traveled all across Europe just to finance his crazy dream! In the 15th century! That is no small feat. He also accomplished his goal of finding something great. But his conduct in the Caribbean is something to be remembered as being nothing less than terrible.

For this reason, I don't really support having a Columbus Day. It should just be Explorer's Day, which is what it used to be before Italian-American groups got it changed to focus on Columbus.

Paraxiom
August 30th, 2016, 03:13 PM
I say no, for the general messy and (for me) unjustified nature of sudden colonisation. Okay, it can be relative by how his actions are arguably central to the development of Mexico and the US, but there are layers of reasoning for and against if that was a good or bad thing.

Overall I'm seeing his supposed heroism by some to actually be relative, depending on how you see 'the greater good' and if this means enough against the initial destruction of the natives' world that he found.

PlasmaHam
August 30th, 2016, 09:01 PM
Columbus wasn't a hero. He was an explorer and a smart guy, but ultimately he was out to gain money. But he wasn't a villain either, he was just a product of his times.

Anyway, it time that this Italian dude stop getting all the credit. Let show some love to the real discoverers of America, the Vikings! They made it to North America by at least 1000AD, and there is considerable evidence they made settlements and explored much of now the Northeast and Midwest US.

Happy Lief Erickson Day! Hinga dinga durgen

Reise
August 30th, 2016, 09:09 PM
Columbus wasn't a hero. He was an explorer and a smart guy, but ultimately he was out to gain money. But he wasn't a villain either, he was just a product of his times.
He was actually pretty hardcore even for his time's standards.

PlasmaHam
August 30th, 2016, 09:17 PM
He was actually pretty hardcore even for his time's standards.

Maybe, but we still must remember that acts like slavery and genocide were not viewed in the negative light we see today. That doesn't excuse his actions, but saying that Columbus was a bloodthirsty villain isn't fair. He might have taken things to the extremes, but that was acceptable, or at least bearable, by most back then.

Reise
August 30th, 2016, 09:28 PM
Maybe, but we still must remember that acts like slavery and genocide were not viewed in the negative light we see today. That doesn't excuse his actions, but saying that Columbus was a bloodthirsty villain isn't fair. He might have taken things to the extremes, but that was acceptable, or at least bearable, by most back then.
That's why the Spanish Crown decided of his imprisonment after his third voyage because of the ruthless tyranny he established as governor?
He had also been previously taken away from power due to the atrocities he committed.
Atrocities reported by both his enemies and his admirers, at least if you believe the words of Francisco de Bobadilla.

Paraxiom
August 30th, 2016, 10:20 PM
He was actually pretty hardcore even for his time's standards.

His usage of lunar eclipse predictions to sway native reception is one of my personal favourites in examples of strategy, I totally grant him that (just not the actual predictions that he did not calculate).

[Congrats on the 1000 posts!]