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Rhys2001
June 29th, 2016, 12:37 PM
I thought this would be the most suiting area as it's education in a way. anyway, Over the summer i will be in france for 8 weeks, i already have quite a deep knowledge of the language (know how to use most subjunctives etc) and i can speak to french people about some things as long as i know the context. so i'm not bilingual! for those bilingual people out there what would be the best way to become as verbally fluent as possible in french within the time that i'm there? any help would be great!!
thanks

PaleBoy
June 29th, 2016, 02:25 PM
You can only be bilingual if you have always spoken 2 languages since birth.

Other than that just get immersed in the local society, listen to music, read books, watch films in french .

Mars
June 29th, 2016, 02:30 PM
You can only be bilingual if you have always spoken 2 languages since birth.

Other than that just get immersed in the local society, listen to music, read books, watch films in french .

Not necessarily. Being bilingual just means you can speak fluently in 2 languages.

As for OP, like PaleBoy said, you want to immerse yourself in the culture, and try to do as many speaking and listening excercises as you can. If you have any friends or know anyone who speaks French, ask them to help you out :)

Jinglebottom
June 29th, 2016, 02:48 PM
I've been learning French since kindergarten as a second language, evidently it wasn't really my decision to start (it was my parents' decision, but I thank them for it). Most of my classes are in French so the fluency just came on its own, it's not a language I can just forget about at this point. :P

I don't have any advice since I have acquired each language I currently speak since early childhood, but if you need anything then I'd be happy to help.

Reise
June 29th, 2016, 03:03 PM
Unless speaking it again and again on a pretty long time period... meh.

It's not like being fluent in a language was the same as strictly learning it.

Cadanance00
June 29th, 2016, 04:39 PM
Bi-lingual. Does that mean you have two tongues. The girls would love that! ROFL

Seriously, it's worth doing for anybody. Somebody said having another language is like having another soul.

JOKE: You know what you call someone who speaks two languages? - Bilingual.

You know what you call someone who speaks three languages? - Trilingual.

What do you call someone who speaks only one language? - American.

Arf, arf, arf.

lliam
June 29th, 2016, 04:45 PM
people out there what would be the best way to become as verbally fluent as possible in french within the time that i'm there?

talk a lot in french to those, who speak it fluently or to native speakers. conversation, practise and such.

Rhys2001
July 2nd, 2016, 11:20 AM
another question to do with fluency...
So I've been learning French for a long time and I'd consider myself "high intermediate".... How long do you think, with a couple of cours a day, including the immersion, would it take to become fluent; not necessarily "native-tongue"?

Periphery
July 2nd, 2016, 11:37 AM
another question to do with fluency...
So I've been learning French for a long time and I'd consider myself "high intermediate".... How long do you think, with a couple of cours a day, including the immersion, would it take to become fluent; not necessarily "native-tongue"?

It all depends on how good you are with learning a language, and how much time you invest in learning it. Even if it are a couple of courses a day it depends how much you are willing to learn it.

You can have a few courses a day and still not give a shit and not learn the language.

Porpoise101
July 2nd, 2016, 12:39 PM
another question to do with fluency...
So I've been learning French for a long time and I'd consider myself "high intermediate".... How long do you think, with a couple of cours a day, including the immersion, would it take to become fluent; not necessarily "native-tongue"?
In reality, I doubt anyone can really try to get the 'true' fluency down. Reading and writing are comparatively easy to speaking. Because speaking requires knowing body language, dialect, and vocabulary, it is much harder to master without actually living there. To be competent in a language, I am not sure for the time spent. The US Foreign Service has a page detailing the average time it takes to learn the major world languages. Maybe you should check that out.

I think that if you are living there, you will pick up on the nuances of the society quick enough.

german_boy
July 2nd, 2016, 05:56 PM
- Watch movies/tv (with French subtitles)
- Speak with locals
- Read books/newspapers
- practice, practice, practice
- write letters, chat with native speaking people

If you do that for a while, you become fluent. Nevertheless, it takes lots of time.

Cadanance00
July 3rd, 2016, 12:03 AM
Texas French: "Bone-juwer, y'all."

Periphery
July 3rd, 2016, 12:51 AM
- Watch movies/tv (with French subtitles)
- Speak with locals
- Read books/newspapers
- practice, practice, practice
- write letters, chat with native speaking people

If you do that for a while, you become fluent. Nevertheless, it takes lots of time.

Well I've been doing that with English since I was 10 or younger and now I can just flip a switch to go full on English.

So yeah what the person above me said works if you want to learn a language fluently.