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Endeavour
June 14th, 2016, 01:05 PM
Got my first french speaking assessment in 2 weeks (this counts to my final GCSE grade) - lucky me I'm the first to do it in my class as well!

Has any one got any tips? I'm pretty nervous; I know what I want to say (we get told the questions in advance) but my mind keeps going blank every time I come to practice.

Reise
June 14th, 2016, 01:42 PM
Use: compound past, simple present and simple future.

With only those 3 tenses you should be able to talk about almost anything haha.

But moreover, don't write down your answers (in order to learn them), but rather understand the question, understand what you want to say, even if you have to improvise the words you won't get (too much) blanks.

devotionnel
June 14th, 2016, 02:42 PM
I'm literally in the process of doing mine... I messed mine up because I'm a weird human but here are some good tips:

- if you are given any resources (like the rules of tenses or keywords if it's about a certain topic like mine) you should revise them well. I'm rubbish at revising, so I had to come to the conclusion of making it up on the spot but it made sense through the revision of the grammar rules and keywords

- revise little and often, and try to everyday if you can. Even if it's something silly like looking at the sheet of paper next to you while watching TV, it can seem to go in your head that way because your brain is stimulated by the TV so you can actually retain it..

- if you need help, talk to your teacher. This will help A LOT. I stressed out so much over the first one and I ended up messing it up because I was so worried. Talking to your teacher (who should know you by the end of the year haha) will be beneficial because he or she can give you some advice on preparation etc...

What do you have to talk about in particular? For the first one I had to talk about holidays and I had to talk about a past holiday, a dream holiday and a future holiday. On a side note Reise I CAN'T DO CONDITIONAL TENSE APPARENTLY HELP

Endeavour
June 14th, 2016, 02:49 PM
I'm literally in the process of doing mine... I messed mine up because I'm a weird human but here are some good tips:

- if you are given any resources (like the rules of tenses or keywords if it's about a certain topic like mine) you should revise them well. I'm rubbish at revising, so I had to come to the conclusion of making it up on the spot but it made sense through the revision of the grammar rules and keywords

- revise little and often, and try to everyday if you can. Even if it's something silly like looking at the sheet of paper next to you while watching TV, it can seem to go in your head that way because your brain is stimulated by the TV so you can actually retain it..

- if you need help, talk to your teacher. This will help A LOT. I stressed out so much over the first one and I ended up messing it up because I was so worried. Talking to your teacher (who should know you by the end of the year haha) will be beneficial because he or she can give you some advice on preparation etc...

What do you have to talk about in particular? For the first one I had to talk about holidays and I had to talk about a past holiday, a dream holiday and a future holiday. On a side note Reise I CAN'T DO CONDITIONAL TENSE APPARENTLY HELP

Hi - about the conditional tense: you use this when you're talking about what could happen (ie. if I won the lottery, I would.., or in an ideal world - dans un monde idéal)
To form it you take the full infinitive verb (the one in the dictionary ending -re, -ir or -er) and add the following endings : je - ais; tu- ais; il/elle - ait; nous - ions; vous- iez; ils/elles - aient.

For example, just picking a random sentence out of mine - J'acheterais une maison (I would buy a house) - does that make sense?

Anyway, thanks for the advice :) I get on really well with my teacher since I've had her since year 7 so I went to her today. Our controlled assessments tend to be a really weird mix of topics - this one is about your family, what you did last weekend , your hobbies and what you will do in the summer.

Reise
June 14th, 2016, 02:53 PM
twentyonehorizons

Conditional present, it's the stem (radical) of the future tense + termination of the imperfect.

http://la-conjugaison.nouvelobs.com/regles/conjugaison/conditionnel-present-38.php

It's a bit of a hell, yeah.

devotionnel
June 14th, 2016, 02:54 PM
Hi - about the conditional tense: you use this when you're talking about what could happen (ie. if I won the lottery, I would.., or in an ideal world - dans un monde idéal)
To form it you take the full infinitive verb (the one in the dictionary ending -re, -ir or -er) and add the following endings : je - ais; tu- ais; il/elle - ait; nous - ions; vous- iez; ils/elles - aient.

I always mix it up with the future tense haha. That's my one flaw. I managed to ace the writing controlled assessments fine it's just the speaking assessments I seem to have a problem with.

I get on with my teacher really good too, because I had her in year 8 and 9 as well as this year. She's leaving in July though so I'm not happy at all. I'm just glad I've got the speaking assessments out of the way now while the teacher is still here though.

Endeavour
June 14th, 2016, 02:57 PM
I always mix it up with the future tense haha. That's my one flaw. I managed to ace the writing controlled assessments fine it's just the speaking assessments I seem to have a problem with.

I get on with my teacher really good too, because I had her in year 8 and 9 as well as this year. She's leaving in July though so I'm not happy at all. I'm just glad I've got the speaking assessments out of the way now while the teacher is still here though.

Have you done all your controlled assessments this year? We've done both our writings, we have the first speaking to do now, and then the second before Christmas. That's a shame she's leaving, hopefully you'll get someone good next year. And also, my teacher says don't worry if you can't do conditional , you only need to do past perfect, present and future to get a good grade.

ValentinClarke
June 14th, 2016, 02:59 PM
Got my first french speaking assessment in 2 weeks (this counts to my final GCSE grade) - lucky me I'm the first to do it in my class as well!

Has any one got any tips? I'm pretty nervous; I know what I want to say (we get told the questions in advance) but my mind keeps going blank every time I come to practice.

Okay, if you haven't written your passage yet- use three tenses, talk about other people (il/elle), use opinions (j'aime, j'adore, je deteste), use negatives (je n'aime pas, il n'y a pas de) etc. etc. Use a variety of verbs, and make sure to fully answer the questions. If it is an open conversation, prepare two questions to ask your teacher. Make sure to use the time given as well as possible, this should be around 6 hours. These will be the most useful hoursof your controlled assessment. Also, use any extra time out of school as well as possible.
If you have written your passage, try writing it out over and over, or read it, say it aloud, say it aloud again, then cover, and see if you can remember it. Or, you could ask your French teacher to record them saying your passage, and listen to it over and over again until you remember it.Talk to your French teacher if there are any words, with which you have difficulty.
Once you are comfortable with your passage, time yourself, and see if you are under 6 minutes (official maximum, at least for my exam board)
EDIT: You can use three tenses, past, present, future, which is like the bare minimum, or you could use even more, like the imperfect, and the conditional in the event that you are comfortable, with which you can gain more marks, and higher grades.

devotionnel
June 14th, 2016, 03:01 PM
Have you done all your controlled assessments this year? We've done both our writings, we have the first speaking to do now, and then the second before Christmas. That's a shame she's leaving, hopefully you'll get someone good next year. And also, my teacher says don't worry if you can't do conditional , you only need to do past perfect, present and future to get a good grade.

Yeah, we've done both the writing and most of us have done the first and just starting the second speaking. It's gonna be difficult for me though because I'm really bad at the speaking and I refused to get it recorded. So I think I messed up the grades there. But I got an A and an A* on the 2 writings so I can't complain... try hard revision haha

Hopefully the actual reading and listening exams come out good, I have to do higher tier on both of the papers and I find the listening higher more difficult.

Reise
June 14th, 2016, 03:02 PM
Learning it by heart is not a good thing bra.

Endeavour
June 14th, 2016, 03:04 PM
Okay, if you haven't written your passage yet- use three tenses, talk about other people (il/elle), use opinions (j'aime, j'adore, je deteste), use negatives (je n'aime pas, il n'y a pas de) etc. etc. Use a variety of verbs, and make sure to fully answer the questions. If it is an open conversation, prepare two questions to ask your teacher. Make sure to use the time given as well as possible, this should be around 6 hours. These will be the most useful hoursof your controlled assessment. Also, use any extra time out of school as well as possible.
If you have written your passage, try writing it out over and over, or read it, say it aloud, say it aloud again, then cover, and see if you can remember it. Or, you could ask your French teacher to record them saying your passage, and listen to it over and over again until you remember it.Talk to your French teacher if there are any words, with which you have difficulty.
Once you are comfortable with your passage, time yourself, and see if you are under 6 minutes (official maximum, at least for my exam board)

Hi, thanks for your advice. Yes we have already done all our passages (in fact we had them done before half term). Our 6 hour time starts tomorrow. Our teacher records it for us anyway. Her recording was 4 mins 39 seconds, so hopefully when it comes to it in 2 weeks I should be fine. Which exam board are you on? My school does AQA.

Thanks for the techniques :)


EDIT: You can use three tenses, past, present, future, which is like the bare minimum, or you could use even more, like the imperfect, and the conditional in the event that you are comfortable, with which you can gain more marks, and higher grades.
My prepared passage does include imperfect (quand j'étais petit) and a conditional, according to my teacher based on my draft it should be about a B/A borderline.

Learning it by heart is not a good thing bra.
Why not? That's what our teacher recommends.

Yeah, we've done both the writing and most of us have done the first and just starting the second speaking. It's gonna be difficult for me though because I'm really bad at the speaking and I refused to get it recorded. So I think I messed up the grades there. But I got an A and an A* on the 2 writings so I can't complain... try hard revision haha

Hopefully the actual reading and listening exams come out good, I have to do higher tier on both of the papers and I find the listening higher more difficult.
On my writings I got an A and an A* as well. We just did our mocks as well and I got 31/35 on reading and 29/35 on listening (it was foundation though) but we're doing higher next year

Reise
June 14th, 2016, 03:11 PM
Why not? That's what our teacher recommends.

Well, if you learn something by heart for oral expression I just don't see the point of the test.
They could just ask you to read what you have written in this case.

Also repeating what you learned by heart doesn't sound natural at all and in case of questions you have good chances to simply lose your words (i.e. blanks blanks blanks).

devotionnel
June 14th, 2016, 03:17 PM
On my writings I got an A and an A* as well. We just did our mocks as well and I got 31/35 on reading and 29/35 on listening (it was foundation though) but we're doing higher next year

I can remember getting about the same, I easily secured a C on both the foundation papers when we were testing past exams. On the reading higher I think I got a high A and on the listening I managed to get a B, so I'm not going to complain much here. My target is A* though D:


Well, if you learn something by heart for oral expression I just don't see the point of the test.
They could just ask you to read what you have written in this case.

That's true, but in the case it's more of a skill of learning it and being able to show that you have enough knowledge to be able to pronounce the words correctly. Like I said before, I learnt off of grammar resources so I essentially filled in my own blanks and in that way it definitely sounds more fluid and free-flowing rather than remembering an exact text because you end up breaking up sentences trying to remember what you wrote down. If you can be a bit more lenient, i.e. making up opinions on the spot, that's not so bad.

The Boom
June 14th, 2016, 07:07 PM
My natal language is french! I am proud to see you are all so interested in our amazing language. To be honest, I admire your determination and your patience! I'd like to speak to show you but can't since the forum forbids it.

Cadanance00
June 15th, 2016, 09:02 AM
Gude lock to yoo ma fran'.

Endeavour
June 15th, 2016, 10:46 AM
Gude lock to yoo ma fran'.
Thank you Kayden :D

My natal language is french! I am proud to see you are all so interested in our amazing language. To be honest, I admire your determination and your patience! I'd like to speak to show you but can't since the forum forbids it.
Yes, French is a wonderful language and I love learning it :)