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Flapjack
May 20th, 2016, 05:00 PM
Hey guys, next year I have to apply for uni and am really unsure about what to study!! I love biology and chemistry so naturally I am looking at biochemistry degrees. Have any of you done this degree and if not what do you think about it?

Vlerchan
May 21st, 2016, 08:28 AM
TheFlapjack

What in particular draws you to those subjects, and do you have any idea what sort of environment you want to work in?

I can be more help with that information. The advice I'd give is that the job-market for general-science graduates is rough and you're always best gathering as much technical-support knowledge as possible. Leaving with a minor in statistics (biostatistics) or computer-science (bio-imfomatics) will put you at a huge advantage when you have to start looking for jobs.

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Full disclaimer, I'm only an economics major (heading into final year) but I have a good friend who plans on making an application for a PhD in biology (genetics or immunology) when he's done his bachelors.

Flapjack
May 21st, 2016, 09:13 AM
TheFlapjack

What in particular draws you to those subjects, and do you have any idea what sort of environment you want to work in?

I can be more help with that information. The advice I'd give is that the job-market for general-science graduates is rough and you're always best gathering as much technical-support knowledge as possible. Leaving with a minor in statistics (biostatistics) or computer-science (bio-imfomatics) will put you at a huge advantage when you have to start looking for jobs.

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Full disclaimer, I'm only an economics major (heading into final year) but I have a good friend who plans on making an application for a PhD in biology (genetics or immunology) when he's done his bachelors.

'Only an economics major' XD Dude that is not an only that is really impressive well done:)

Well I've always really loved science and I love organic chemistry and learning how chemicals will react and effect the body so I was thinking I might be a toxicologist? There's not a lot of jobs for those leaving college though so I might start off working in the NHS and then work for a private company and earn the big bucks:p

Tbh though there are loads of other things that interest me, such as being an industrial chemist and my dream job would be a research scientist:')

Reise
May 21st, 2016, 09:21 AM
The knowledge you can acquire is way more important than the job you can get mate.

Although it is pretty important to imagine where you'd be in 5 or 8 years.

You can also do biochemical engineering, which gives access to pretty intellectual jobs (and well paid btw).

SmileySui
May 21st, 2016, 09:36 AM
I want to get a degree in Biology. It is very interesting, as for me

Vlerchan
May 21st, 2016, 09:44 AM
'Only an economics major' XD Dude that is not an only that is really impressive well done
Thank you. Though I meant it more in that I'm not really able to give you the science-related advice you're looking for: just general impressions :).

If you're willing to put in the work research-scientist is quite attainable. If that's your dream I'd recommend aiming for it. It's tough to get into research in the sciences - pretty significant oversupply: most PhD-holders spend a considerable time in postdoctorates (that's still research) - but worst case scenario, you go industry and earn big bucks.

If your interest is just in earning big bucks though, in almost all professions the best advice is to sell your soul and acquire an MBA.

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What do biochemical engineers actually do?

Flapjack
May 21st, 2016, 09:49 AM
Thank you. Though I meant it more in that I'm not really able to give you the science-related advice you're looking for: just general impressions :).

If you're willing to put in the work research-scientist is quite attainable. If that's your dream I'd recommend aiming for it. It's tough to get into research in the sciences - pretty significant oversupply: most PhD-holders spend a considerable time in postdoctorates (that's still research) - but worst case scenario, you go industry and earn big bucks.

If your interest is just in earning big bucks though, in almost all professions the best advice is to sell your soul and acquire an MBA.

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What do biochemical engineers actually do?

Thanks for the advice buddyyy!!:) Wow you are really knowledgeable on all this!!:)

As far as I know biochemical engineers build the equipment, for example the design the biofermenters that grow the ethanol producing bacteria, for example. I have no interest in that thoughxD must be soooo boringXD

Elysium
May 21st, 2016, 12:14 PM
Not to discredit any of the prior (and fantastic) advice, but if you're not applying until next year, depending on where you are and where you go, this isn't really a decision you need to make yet. For example, lots of liberal arts schools won't require you to declare a major until sometime in your sophomore year. You'll likely have a chance to explore both subjects more thoroughly before making a decision. At least you know what areas you want to look into to start with!

Flapjack
May 21st, 2016, 12:42 PM
Not to discredit any of the prior (and fantastic) advice, but if you're not applying until next year, depending on where you are and where you go, this isn't really a decision you need to make yet. For example, lots of liberal arts schools won't require you to declare a major until sometime in your sophomore year. You'll likely have a chance to explore both subjects more thoroughly before making a decision. At least you know what areas you want to look into to start with!

Thanks for the advice buddyyy:)

NeuroTiger
May 21st, 2016, 01:53 PM
I had biochem in my medical course syllabus this year and it was indeed very interesting.

Flapjack
May 21st, 2016, 02:36 PM
I had biochem in my medical course syllabus this year and it was indeed very interesting.

Yeah I love itXD Is that a medicine degree and what country are you from buddy?

Porpoise101
May 21st, 2016, 08:41 PM
I don't know if this will help you but...

Personally, I found myself drawn to the biology side of things more. I love plants and hopefully I will be able to go into biotechnology or agronomy if my future pans out. I'm a student just like you, so I'm still considering what I want in life. The way I chose what I want is by narrowing down what I like most, and then considering if I want it to be a hobby or a job.

For example: I love gardening, but being a horticulturalist does not pay as well. So that can be my hobby and then I can be something that pays better to support that hobby. In this way, the only limiting factor of life will be time.