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View Full Version : I have a friend addicted to meth, whats the best way to support them?


Mikeymic
April 6th, 2016, 03:11 PM
^^^^Title.

TrillClinton
April 6th, 2016, 06:58 PM
The thing people don't realize about addiction is that its such a complex and barely understood brain disease. You can't force an addict to just stop; it's never going to happen. An addict is only going to stop for themselves. Sure they might say they'll stop for their family, their friends, their job, but in reality they wont.
Unless they are deadset on quitting, you'll just have to accept that they are going to continue using.

I've been on the end of both sides. I've been friends with an addict, and I am a recovering addict, so I know how hard it can be. Trust me, addiction is a bitch, and it is not an easy disease to overcome. When my addiction was at the worst, I had already destroyed so many relationships between my family and my friends. All I would think about is the next time I could get high. I didn't bother caring about my family, hanging out with friends, hell I barely even ate or drink.

The best thing you can do for them is to just let them know you are there for them. It's gonna be tough maintain a friendship with an addict, as many of us tend to push people away and just focus on our addiction. If you really want you can make sure to check up on them as often as you can. Depending on how heavy their use is, this could potentially save them if they happen to overdose and nobody knows.
The best thing is to just let them know you'll always be there for support. Don't tell them you want them to stop, don't say you're gonna force an intervention; trust me, that is just going to make them cut you out of their life. Just tell them that they can always count on you for support, venting, whatever.

Addiction is a bitch, and, unfortunately, it's a bitch you're gonna have with you your whole life. It's understandable if you get upset or frustrated with them, but trust me, the addict is as upset and frustrated as you are. We don't want to be addicted; addiction is something I would never wish on anyone.

Sheriff McGregor
April 6th, 2016, 07:03 PM
You need to tell an adult if you care about there well being. Allowing them to continue this addiction shows that you don't care about there well being.

TrillClinton
April 6th, 2016, 07:12 PM
You need to tell an adult if you care about there well being. Allowing them to continue this addiction shows that you don't care about there well being.

What is telling an adult really going to do, honestly?
Sure you can tell their parents and the parents can make them go to therapy or counseling or NA meetings. Worst case scenario, they get their friend sent to a psych ward. So then what? Their friend is sober for what, 5 days? 5 days spent feeling the worst they have ever been, emotionally and physically.
Ok, so now they're out of the psych ward what are the parents gonna do now? Take away their phone so they can't buy meth? Sure but an addict is going to find their fix no matter what. I'm sure they probably have friends or connects to get more meth from. Maybe the parents kick them out for being an addict? Okay so now you have a homeless meth addict roamng the streets, way better for both the addict and the family.

Yeah, sure, you can go ahead and tell an adult. Then you won't have to worry about your friend being a meth addict because they won't be your friend anymore! Win for both sides

Sheriff McGregor
April 6th, 2016, 07:16 PM
What is telling an adult really going to do, honestly?
Sure you can tell their parents and the parents can make them go to therapy or counseling or NA meetings. Worst case scenario, they get their friend sent to a psych ward. So then what? Their friend is sober for what, 5 days? 5 days spent feeling the worst they have ever been, emotionally and physically.
Ok, so now they're out of the psych ward what are the parents gonna do now? Take away their phone so they can't buy meth? Sure but an addict is going to find their fix no matter what. I'm sure they probably have friends or connects to get more meth from. Maybe the parents kick them out for being an addict? Okay so now you have a homeless meth addict roamng the streets, way better for both the addict and the family.

Yeah, sure, you can go ahead and tell an adult. Then you won't have to worry about your friend being a meth addict because they won't be your friend anymore! Win for both sides

Counseling or rehab could help. They could find a twelve step program. If OP doesn't tell an adult, the user will continue to use and spiral down a bad path and could eventually OD. It's selfish for one to keep it a secret. It's responsible to notify a parent or counselor.

TrillClinton
April 6th, 2016, 07:26 PM
Counseling or rehab could help. They could find a twelve step program. If OP doesn't tell an adult, the user will continue to use and spiral down a bad path and could eventually OD. It's selfish for one to keep it a secret. It's responsible to notify a parent or counselor.

If OP's friend is a meth addict like they say then trust me, this probably isn't news to their parents. Methamphetamine isn't an easy drug to hide. It is very noticeable, even in first time users. I'm sure the parents have noticed the sleepless nights, the pinpoint pupils, the ammonia body odor, the shakiness and paranoia. If the parents cared jack-shit about their child or paid any attention I am sure they would have noticed something is up.

You can give them as much counseling and rehab and support as you want but unless they themselves have the desire to quit, they are just going to continue to use and use and use.

Sheriff McGregor
April 6th, 2016, 09:53 PM
The OP could inform a school counselor or if push comes to shove he could notify the police/ school administration.

TrillClinton
April 6th, 2016, 10:35 PM
The OP could inform a school counselor or if push comes to shove he could notify the police/ school administration.

No. no, no, no. There is NO reason at all to notify the school administration and especially not the police. Addiction is a mental health issue it is not a crime. Police and school administration are not fans of drug users. And methamphetamine is highly considered the worst drug out there by many, many people.

If OP tells the police his friend is a meth addict, they can easily charge the friend with possession of methamphetamine. And if they really wanna be dicks, they can hit him with intent to distribute. Now the kids' whole life is ruined thanks to our bullshit war on drugs.

And school has no business in knowing this kid is an addict. HIPAA prevents them from even knowing if he is going to rehab or seeing a counselor. They are not involved in his treatment so they don't need to know.

Periphery
April 7th, 2016, 12:26 AM
No. no, no, no. There is NO reason at all to notify the school administration and especially not the police. Addiction is a mental health issue it is not a crime. Police and school administration are not fans of drug users. And methamphetamine is highly considered the worst drug out there by many, many people.

If OP tells the police his friend is a meth addict, they can easily charge the friend with possession of methamphetamine. And if they really wanna be dicks, they can hit him with intent to distribute. Now the kids' whole life is ruined thanks to our bullshit war on drugs.

And school has no business in knowing this kid is an addict. HIPAA prevents them from even knowing if he is going to rehab or seeing a counselor. They are not involved in his treatment so they don't need to know.

They could also try to help him. Not every school/policeman will instantly try to get them in trouble. It should be the school trying to help the person.

If the guy has a severe addiction it's just a matter of time untill the school will notice, grades dropping, lack of concentration in class. You can't exactly hide a meth addiction to the school forever.

Let Me Be a Pony
April 7th, 2016, 08:55 PM
No. no, no, no. There is NO reason at all to notify the school administration and especially not the police. Addiction is a mental health issue it is not a crime. Police and school administration are not fans of drug users. And methamphetamine is highly considered the worst drug out there by many, many people.

If OP tells the police his friend is a meth addict, they can easily charge the friend with possession of methamphetamine. And if they really wanna be dicks, they can hit him with intent to distribute. Now the kids' whole life is ruined thanks to our bullshit war on drugs.

And school has no business in knowing this kid is an addict. HIPAA prevents them from even knowing if he is going to rehab or seeing a counselor. They are not involved in his treatment so they don't need to know.

There's drug rehabilitation, lol. The first step is admitting that they got a problem of course.

TrillClinton
April 7th, 2016, 08:58 PM
There's drug rehabilitation, lol. The first step is admitting that they got a problem of course.

That is assuming the friend even wants to quit meth. Just because you want them to stop smoking meth doesn't mean they will. It's the friend's choice whether or not he wants to accept treatment.

Let Me Be a Pony
April 8th, 2016, 03:22 AM
That is assuming the friend even wants to quit meth. Just because you want them to stop smoking meth doesn't mean they will. It's the friend's choice whether or not he wants to accept treatment.

Telling an adult will usually put them into a drug rehab centre. People with addictions do need much support to get through this.

phuckphace
April 8th, 2016, 06:21 AM
I'm probably going to sound like an asshole here but w/e. I have very little sympathy for most drug addicts, especially those addicted to meth. I'm very sick and tired of dealing with these lurching White Walkers who stare at you with their tweaked out dead eyes sunken into their sockets and screeching gutturally like something out of DeadSpace.

you should ignore ShillClinton's posts especially (your first clue is use of the phrase "bullshit war on drugs", that's how you know to stop reading). the "addiction is a brain disease" line is druggie logic that druggies use to excuse their horrifically bad personal choices and deflect blame onto The Man instead. the fact is that meth addicts are at fault for choosing to start using a very addictive and dangerous substance that they know is very addictive and dangerous. instead of just smoking cannabis like normal people, which can be flushed and forgotten as soon as you decide to stop, they just had to pick one of the worst and deadliest out there. the consequences, including hard time, are just par for the course. that's exactly what happens when you make the choice to indulge in reckless hedonism without regard for the safety or well-being of others around you.

I also wouldn't put any stock into "it has to be the person's own decision" either - you're dealing with a very potent neurotoxin that does extensive and lasting damage, and impedes the person's ability to make rational decisions (although the fact that they decided to go within a mile of meth in the first place is a good sign their rational decision-making abilities were lacking to begin with). it's serious enough that intervention by the authorities and hospitalization is the only realistic way.

Fiction
April 8th, 2016, 06:31 AM
I'm probably going to sound like an asshole here but w/e. I have very little sympathy for most drug addicts, especially those addicted to meth. I'm very sick and tired of dealing with these lurching White Walkers who stare at you with their tweaked out dead eyes sunken into their sockets and screeching gutturally like something out of DeadSpace.

you should ignore ShillClinton's posts especially (your first clue is use of the phrase "bullshit war on drugs", that's how you know to stop reading). the "addiction is a brain disease" line is druggie logic that druggies use to excuse their horrifically bad personal choices and deflect blame onto The Man instead. the fact is that meth addicts are at fault for choosing to start using a very addictive and dangerous substance that they know is very addictive and dangerous. instead of just smoking cannabis like normal people, which can be flushed and forgotten as soon as you decide to stop, they just had to pick one of the worst and deadliest out there. the consequences, including hard time, are just par for the course. that's exactly what happens when you make the choice to indulge in reckless hedonism without regard for the safety or well-being of others around you.

I also wouldn't put any stock into "it has to be the person's own decision" either - you're dealing with a very potent neurotoxin that does extensive and lasting damage, and impedes the person's ability to make rational decisions (although the fact that they decided to go within a mile of meth in the first place is a good sign their rational decision-making abilities were lacking to begin with). it's serious enough that intervention by the authorities and hospitalization is the only realistic way.

Having just finished a degree in Psychology and Neuroscience, I would like to point out that addition is a disease of the brain. There is, however, a choice whether to start the drug or not. But sometimes people just have so little hope and value themselves so little that they are willing to try anything that will take them out of that position. Also most addicts, even when trying an addictie substance, believe they will not become addicts.

I actually think ShillClinton's advice is pretty sound, and that yours is judgemental and harsh.

phuckphace
April 8th, 2016, 06:48 AM
I'm wearily familiar with all the rationalizations out there, believe me. but when you're someone like me who is badgered almost weekly by aggressive, erratic and confrontational tweakers, without the means to defend myself if it escalates, it wears thin pretty quick.

someone whose poor personal choices affect me and the rest of society directly deserves all the judgement they get for it, I'm afraid.

Cadanance00
April 8th, 2016, 12:27 PM
I haven't seen meth turn out well yet.

TrillClinton
April 8th, 2016, 04:37 PM
I'm probably going to sound like an asshole here but w/e. I have very little sympathy for most drug addicts, especially those addicted to meth. I'm very sick and tired of dealing with these lurching White Walkers who stare at you with their tweaked out dead eyes sunken into their sockets and screeching gutturally like something out of DeadSpace.
While you are entitled to your own opinion of drug addicts, you are exaggerating about these "White Walkers". Yes, some tweakers do happen to be batshit crazy, but to say you are "badgered almost weekly by aggressive, erratic and confrontational tweakers," that is so bs. I'm not saying you've never been harassed by tweakers, but to say it happens weekly to you and that they are "agressive, eratic, and confrontational" is a downright lie. I doubt most tweakers give a damn about you. And if they do happen to "attack" you I'm sure you probably confronted them first considering your view on drug addicts.

you should ignore ShillClinton's posts especially (your first clue is use of the phrase "bullshit war on drugs", that's how you know to stop reading).
You do realize that the war on drugs was created to imprison minorities and anti-war protesters. Think this is just some more of my "druggie logic". How bout you find out for yourself (http://www.vox.com/2016/3/22/11278760/war-on-drugs-racism-nixon) There are plenty of sources you can find online that prove the war on drugs is bs (http://www.drugpolicy.org/race-and-drug-war).
Or how about the fact that he war on drugs is directly responsible for Mexico's drug cartels. (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/the-staggering-death-toll-of-mexicos-drug-war/)

the "addiction is a brain disease" line is druggie logic that druggies use to excuse their horrifically bad personal choices and deflect blame onto The Man instead.
Now you're just being stupid. You can't deny the facts (https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/understanding-drug-abuse-addiction)

the fact is that meth addicts are at fault for choosing to start using a very addictive and dangerous substance that they know is very addictive and dangerous.
I can agree with you there. Meth addicts know what they're fucking with, but at the same time do we not have free will? Are we not allowed to do what we want in our life, whether it is good or bad? There is no reason why the government should be telling people what they can or can't put into their bodies.

I also wouldn't put any stock into "it has to be the person's own decision" either - you're dealing with a very potent neurotoxin that does extensive and lasting damage, and impedes the person's ability to make rational decisions (although the fact that they decided to go within a mile of meth in the first place is a good sign their rational decision-making abilities were lacking to begin with). it's serious enough that intervention by the authorities and hospitalization is the only realistic way.
Okay so they go to rehab and then they come out. What's gonna happen next? Do you think rehab is some magical place where you walk in and voila you're cured of your addiction?
You do realize that addiction has a relapse rate of 40-60% (https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugs-brains-behavior-science-addiction/treatment-recovery)
If they didn't want to get sober in the first place they don't give a damn about what you want. They want their fix, they're gonna get it.

Mikeymic
April 11th, 2016, 06:02 PM
This was a very intense read guys. But thanks for giving me the varied perspectives

ComfortableInChaos
April 12th, 2016, 12:50 PM
I've personally done meth and honestly, it's a great feeling... when you're on it. When he/she is coming down, they're going to feel horribly dead and wanting everything to end or they'll want more meth. I had a friend who was hooked on meth before I started any of my drug venturing and she would tweak outside our school and she'd start freaking out with withdrawals.

Trust me, if anything you remember from this forum, make sure they know you're there to help them. Also, try to get them off of it as soon as possible. It's a drug I wish I never did.

ComfortableInChaos
April 12th, 2016, 12:52 PM
You need to tell an adult if you care about there well being. Allowing them to continue this addiction shows that you don't care about there well being.

Do NOT!!!! do this. This will only make them turn against you and will make them think you don't give a shit. It's easier for them to trust you if you're supportive and help the best you can. Helping =/= telling on them.

Mikeymic
April 13th, 2016, 12:28 AM
Update: My friend had a really huge psych breakdown today. Ended up going to the hospital. Now, he wants to quit of his own accord.

kev1998
April 13th, 2016, 08:53 AM
A good friend of mine Matt was addicted to Meth and then to Methadone. He was buying the Methadone off the street and was not in any treatment facility. I knew what he was doing but wanted to be a cool friend and tell no one. He acted like he had everything under control and I did not want to make trouble for him. Matt has been dead 3 years now from a Methadone overdose. I was one of 6 guys that carried my best friend to his grave and I live with my decision EVERYDAY. I can't tell you the number of times that I wish that I would have told my parents, his parents or someone that could have intervened.

Fehu
April 23rd, 2016, 01:37 PM
^^^^Title.

Hello OP, first, id like to say trill clinton is probably still tweakin(no offence, but i can tell by them long ass posts lol). As someone whos been addicted to meth, I want to say that first, you can only help your friend if they want to recover. Trying to force someone who wants to do meth to quit will just fuck your relation up and make you look like a dickhead, and trying to help someone who doesnt really want to quit it redundant. What he needs to do is stop talking to frienda who do meth, cut off plugs, and eat/exercise good. Ime what got me off meth for good was LSA, but ive heard other psychadelics like shrooms, lsd, dmt, etc have worked effectively in treatment too.

Removed insult. ~ Xander.