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Sailor Mars
April 3rd, 2016, 07:56 PM
So I'm really confused about paying for college...

So my family (for whatever dumb shit reason) didn't set aside money for my brother and I to go to college. My brother is 17, going on 18 and going to college, and I'm 14 going on 15 in Highschool and already looking into colleges. How are we supposed to get money for school? My brother is really worried about student debt (which he should be...) and I really don't want to have to take out a loan and go into debt for the rest of my life. My dad, the fucking hippie he is, says "don't worry about it" "money shouldn't stop you from doing something you want to do" yada yada, but seriously? What are we supposed to do? Go to school, get a degree, never use it, and live in debt for the rest of our lives but hey, it's okay because money isn't everything right?

Even if I do start saving money, I'm not going to have enough to do anything with. Even if I went to a public college, again, I'm not going to have enough.

So how do people pay for college with no money? Does it end up being a necessity to get a loan?

Cuz if so that would fucking suck

Fuck it tho. I'll just join the military and get the government to pay for it

StoppingTom
April 3rd, 2016, 09:12 PM
It basically becomes a necessity to get a loan if you don't get some form of scholarship, yeah.

phuckphace
April 3rd, 2016, 09:52 PM
probably a blessing in disguise, fam

degrees are oversold and overhyped, and even getting one doesn't guarantee you'll actually be able to land a good job much less keep it. realistically you'd finish school, get the degree and then get stuck with massive debt while you deliver pizzas or sack groceries.

I work with several people at my grocery job who have degrees hanging on their wall and yet here they are sacking groceries alongside the Beav. imagine having a serious job with a family to feed until one day the CEO wants another Gulfstream for his collection and gets rolling with the layoffs. such is life in the current year!

tl;dr don't get suckered in to the diploma merchant's little scheme

Sailor Mars
April 3rd, 2016, 09:54 PM
probably a blessing in disguise, fam

degrees are oversold and overhyped, and even getting one doesn't guarantee you'll actually be able to land a good job much less keep it. realistically you'd finish school, get the degree and then get stuck with massive debt while you deliver pizzas or sack groceries.

I work with several people at my grocery job who have degrees hanging on their wall and yet here they are sacking groceries alongside the Beav. imagine having a serious job with a family to feed until one day the CEO wants another Gulfstream for his collection and gets rolling with the layoffs. such is life in the current year!

tl;dr don't get suckered in to the diploma merchant's little scheme

The thing is, what can you do without a degree? Not a lot (or at least as far as realistic jobs go). But then it's not guaranteed to get you anything if you do have one... Double cuck

CosmicNoodle
April 3rd, 2016, 10:42 PM
In the Uk you take out a loan and pay it back, it's called not depending on Mummy and Daddy. In the Uk having Uni paid for is unheard of, it basically doesn't happen, we still get by.

Elysium
April 3rd, 2016, 11:58 PM
Financial aid is a thing too. And that can come in multiple forms, not just grants. I wouldn't count on scholarships.

Vlerchan
April 4th, 2016, 02:59 AM
The thing is, what can you do without a degree? Not a lot (or at least as far as realistic jobs go). But then it's not guaranteed to get you anything if you do have one... Double cuck
Like all investments: an investment in human capital requires accepting some degree of risk. Still no investment has as good the returns on such a consistent basis.

I for certain wouldn't take the half decade out from the financial crash as the new normal regardless.

---

Unless the degree is in something useless the returns from the education should outstrip the costs that future debt imposes. I'd also look into financial aid though just to lessen the burden.

I also don't mean to hijack the thread but I have a related question:

When it comes to taking out loans is some sort of collateral expected? Because I have nothing of the sort and will need to take out a considerable sum to do the masters I want to do next year.

phuckphace
April 4th, 2016, 05:11 AM
The thing is, what can you do without a degree? Not a lot (or at least as far as realistic jobs go). But then it's not guaranteed to get you anything if you do have one... Double cuck

damned if you do, damned if you don't, yes indeedy

the older generations usually shill for college because they still live in the past where they weren't having to compete with the entire world for a job under criminally rapacious management who view you as some kind of bipedal tapeworm draining their life-force. not to be a downer but it truly is a shit time to be alive

Vlerchan
April 4th, 2016, 05:34 AM
http://equitablegrowth.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/college-wage-col.gif

Keep in mind that this is accounting for the proliferation of useless humanities degrees like afro-asian gender studies.

Like I claimed above: the expected wage premium far outstrips the burden of the accompanying debt.

Zachary G
April 4th, 2016, 05:50 AM
you could always research and apply for scholarships, there are plenty of places that offer scholarships to students that apply or meet certain criteria. By doing that you reduce the amount of loans you would have to get. And then as a last resort, you could always join the military and let them pay for everything.

phuckphace
April 4th, 2016, 07:41 AM
I suppose I wasn't entirely clear in my post above so I'll expand a little.

yes those people with degrees can generally expect to squeeze a few more dollars an hour from their employer vs. someone without a degree - $24 or even 18/hr (before taxes) sounds decent until you factor in living expenses and other costs that will quickly turn your eighteen an hour into an effective zero dollars an hour. rent is already high and will only get higher as our population increases - you can also forget about a mortgage (no credit is effectively the same as bad credit) and even if you do manage to qualify for a mortgage, you've now landed two huge debts instead of one.

this is also assuming that your employer won't fuck with your hours or lay you off at any point (they will). all it takes is one layoff or round of hourly cutbacks and you lose your apartment/house, car, and whatever else you have on credit. aforementioned living costs will make it much more difficult to save for dire circumstances than it may appear.

'Murica.

----

higher education is sold as being kind of like visiting the video game store, choosing a disc off the rack, paying the cashier and then bringing it home, insert into slot, press play. in the real world people have individual strengths/weaknesses and differing personality types which means they'll excel in one field/industry but suck hard in others - and the field you excel in may or may not be the same one that's in high demand and pays a lot. a given field may also pay a lot but have less job security vs. another job that pays less but has more job security. the chances of ending up stuck in a job that you hate and are miserable in but can't leave because the money is just good enough to scrape by are extremely high, even if you've gone to Prof. Goldbag's Diploma Emporium.

some people manage, I suppose, but going in with unrealistic expectations (i.e. that the degree is in fact a magic path to success that they're presented as) will lead to a huge disappointment down the road once you get a dose of the free market.

ImCoolBeans
April 4th, 2016, 07:50 AM
Look into the Pell grant. It's financial aid that you don't need to pay back. I didn't have any money set aside for college either and that helped a lot. I started out in community college, which is much more affordable than starting at a 4 year college, and right now I am debt free at 21. When I move onto a 4 year college I will be taking out student loans, and honestly (not to sound like your dad) I'm not extremely worried about it because I will hopefully be able to pay them off in the future, and I did save a lot by starting at community college. Student loans unfortunately are par for the course if you aren't moderately wealthy (who is?). Try applying for every scholarship you can. There are tons of websites you can sign up for scholarships on and there isn't a limit as to how many you can receive. If you really work for it you could end up receiving a lot of aid in paying for college that way. That is really contingent on how you do in school, though.

Do keep in mind that your income will be combined with your parents income when it comes to financial aid, if you're working. I ended up getting hurt by that this year because I made more than I did last year, and it was just enough to not qualify for financial aid. Though the threshold was lower since my tuition is considerably lower than that of a 4 year school.

phuckphace
April 4th, 2016, 08:01 AM
Pell grants are a good idea (for some people, not me because getting acceptable grades requires that you aren't a literal retard) but AFAIK they don't give those kinds of grants out for most of the sweet jobs that reliably pay fat stacks (STEM). if your grades are good, look into it at least.

personally I would vastly prefer a classical education but unfortunately due to the status quo, Plato is of limited utility in the service economy - so if I have to choose between being able to eat and pay rent vs. learning Ancient Greek I'll have to go with the former.

ImCoolBeans
April 4th, 2016, 08:12 AM
Pell grants are a good idea (for some people, not me because getting acceptable grades requires that you aren't a literal retard) but AFAIK they don't give those kinds of grants out for most of the sweet jobs that reliably pay fat stacks (STEM). if your grades are good, look into it at least.

personally I would vastly prefer a classical education but unfortunately due to the status quo, Plato is of limited utility in the service economy - so if I have to choose between being able to eat and pay rent vs. learning Ancient Greek I'll have to go with the former.

The Pell grant isn't contingent on grades in high school (or college). As long as you get in and qualify for aid you should be able to get it. How much you receive will be determined by your combined house income though. This is where it hurt me, because apparently making like $2000 more this year, that I have virtually no savings to show for, is enough to pay for college right? You work in a supermarket similar to mine, you know I'm not making bank :P

phuckphace
April 4th, 2016, 08:28 AM
The Pell grant isn't contingent on grades in high school (or college). As long as you get in and qualify for aid you should be able to get it. How much you receive will be determined by your combined house income though. This is where it hurt me, because apparently making like $2000 more this year, that I have virtually no savings to show for, is enough to pay for college right? You work in a supermarket similar to mine, you know I'm not making bank :P

I meant if your grades don't stay up throughout the Pell-subsidized college stint and you fail, you do in fact have to pay it back (source: someone I know who's moderately smarter than me and flunked). out of curiosity I applied myself and got accepted, but I haven't gone through with it since failure in my case is even more certain than death and taxes.

it's also my understanding that community colleges are considered dinky and low-effort by most employers, and that to make as much as someone with a four-year degree they'll expect 10 decades of experience along with it.

man I just sound like such a killjoy here :lol3:

ImCoolBeans
April 4th, 2016, 08:48 AM
I meant if your grades don't stay up throughout the Pell-subsidized college stint and you fail, you do in fact have to pay it back (source: someone I know who's moderately smarter than me and flunked). out of curiosity I applied myself and got accepted, but I haven't gone through with it since failure in my case is even more certain than death and taxes.

it's also my understanding that community colleges are considered dinky and low-effort by most employers, and that to make as much as someone with a four-year degree they'll expect 10 decades of experience along with it.

Ah, I thought you meant if you get accepted in the first place you'd have to pay them back. My misunderstanding.

Although when it it comes to community college I don't believe that is the case at all. Anyone I've ever spoken to about it considers it a smart, economical way to start college, and tons of people start out that way. According to college board (reputable source): In fall 2013, 43% of all and 26% of full-time undergraduate students were enrolled in community colleges. Transferring to a 4 year school is generally not difficult out of community college and if you don't graduate and transfer beforehand there wouldn't even be a trace of being there on your résumé unless you feel inclined to include it. It's all about where your bachelors or masters is from.

West Coast Sheriff
April 4th, 2016, 05:36 PM
You can apply for financial aid which should hopefully be helpful. If you do well in school, you can get scholarships. You are still young enough and have time to work and save up money for yourself. If your interested in the Air Force, there's ROTC. Loans have no collateral and if you struggle to pay them off, you won't lose anything.

The thing is, what can you do without a degree? Not a lot (or at least as far as realistic jobs go). But then it's not guaranteed to get you anything if you do have one... Double cuck

Real estate, banker, open a small business, secretary, insurance salesperson, car salesperson, the list goes on.

SethfromMI
April 4th, 2016, 07:43 PM
It basically becomes a necessity to get a loan if you don't get some form of scholarship, yeah.

yea pretty much. many parents simply cant afford to put much money aside for their children's education. you can save up money, work while your going through school, apply for every scholarship/grant you can, but at the end of the day, the chances of you needing to take out some type of loan is very realistic. I know that is not what you want to hear, but that is the reality

or join the military. they will pay a good portion (in some cases all) of your education

Xiao.Z
April 22nd, 2016, 07:08 PM
I hate school but I maybe try athletic scholarship. If scholarship not work I not go. Family will not pay to send me.

Body odah Man
April 23rd, 2016, 09:03 AM
So I'm really confused about paying for college...

So my family (for whatever dumb shit reason) didn't set aside money for my brother and I to go to college. My brother is 17, going on 18 and going to college, and I'm 14 going on 15 in Highschool and already looking into colleges. How are we supposed to get money for school? My brother is really worried about student debt (which he should be...) and I really don't want to have to take out a loan and go into debt for the rest of my life. My dad, the fucking hippie he is, says "don't worry about it" "money shouldn't stop you from doing something you want to do" yada yada, but seriously? What are we supposed to do? Go to school, get a degree, never use it, and live in debt for the rest of our lives but hey, it's okay because money isn't everything right?

Even if I do start saving money, I'm not going to have enough to do anything with. Even if I went to a public college, again, I'm not going to have enough.

So how do people pay for college with no money? Does it end up being a necessity to get a loan?

Cuz if so that would fucking suck

Fuck it tho. I'll just join the military and get the government to pay for it

Guess that means the military cuz it is sadly impossible to pay for college without getting a loan or scholarship. Sorry miss :(