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The Byrd
February 10th, 2016, 01:27 PM
If you're looking for info about bands and musicians and shit, ignore anything written by Richie Unterberger. The guy knows nothing about what he's supposedly an expert on. He's also the single ugliest human being on the planet.

This asshole, who is touted as a "Byrds expert", is a major contributor to AllMusic.com, a website that people go to to learn about bands and music and shit. Being that he is a "Byrds expert", he had the responsibility of providing their official biography on their AllMusic page.

The red portion of the biography denotes his write up on The Byrds' 1969/1972 period (the period I refer to as "The Good Byrds", which produced 5 studio albums, 2 official live albums, countless live bootlegs, and was the longest lived lineup the band ever had). In that pitifully small synopsis of the band's longest and most productive period, he doesn't mention the names of John York, Gene Parsons, or Skip Battin. He refers to them as "other musicians". Instead of providing information about their work, like he tediously did with every single previous album, he takes the time instead to insult McGuinn's songwriting and lament the changes in their personnel/sound. This wouldn't bother me if it were on his blog or an editorial or something, but this is the band's official biography on a website that people go to to learn about music. Prospective listeners will be quick to ignore that period of the band because of this idiot's douchbaggery, biased write up. How can this be a bio of the band and not mention half the people in the band? As if this wasn't dumb enough, the guy says that "Chestnut Mare", "Jesus Is Just Alright", and "Drug Store Truck Driving Man" (which are considered the Good Byrds' 3 best songs by most critics) are good only because they capture the spirit of the old Byrds lineup. Anyone with a brain in their head knows that's not even slightly true. There's nothing in any of those songs that's in any way similar to the early Byrds. "Chestnut Mare" features actual dynamics and guitar virtuosity. "Jesus Is Just Alright" features a groove that the original band could never have pulled off. "Drug Store Truck Driving Man" is a fucking country song complete with pedal steel guitar; the early Byrds never even attempted that. This stupid assertion serves only to devalue the musical innovations made by the later Byrds. It's like he's offended by the very idea that they were great. He never mentions that they were the first and most important 2nd wave Country Rock band, never mentions how brilliant of a guitarist Clarence White was, never mentions the names of any of the albums they made,never mentions their reputation as a killer live act, never mentions the 300 shows a year they played, never mentions that they were the longest lived Byrds lineup in the band's history, never mentions the influence on virtually every California music act that came after them (including a little band called the fucking EAGLES), and never mentions half the people in the fucking band. He spends like 10 paragraphs analysing every shitty album they made prior to that point, and then brushes them off in one poorly written, offensive, mentally retarded diatribe of bullshit. And because of this, fewer people will even give the later group a chance. And it's not just on AllMusic; this cocksucker appears in documentaries, writes books, album liner notes, etc. He's considered a credible source on this era of music, yet he neglects to even mention the names of the people in the era's best band. He's a piece of shit, he looks like a mentally retarded half aborted child, he doesn't know shit about music. Anytime you see something written by Richie Unterberger, don't dignify it with your time because it's a fucking waste.

Oh my. This was supposed to be short.

Hyper
February 22nd, 2016, 03:32 AM
Your fanboyism of a particular band seems to have reached unhealthily high levels, almost like a beatletard.

It's music, it's a band. If someone else doesn't like it so what? Sure he is a critic sure someone might read his write up and ignore a part of your favorite bands discography but you know in reality most people who would do that are the type of people who only listen to the most famous album to begin with and nothing more.

The Byrd
February 22nd, 2016, 07:08 PM
Your fanboyism of a particular band seems to have reached unhealthily high levels, almost like a beatletard.

It's music, it's a band. If someone else doesn't like it so what? Sure he is a critic sure someone might read his write up and ignore a part of your favorite bands discography but you know in reality most people who would do that are the type of people who only listen to the most famous album to begin with and nothing more.
Like I said, I don't mind the fact that he prefers the original Byrds over The Good Byrds, but All Music is a professional website where people go to find out information on a particular band. He had the responsibility of writing their official biography. The McGuinn/Battin/White/Parsons lineup was the longest lived in the group and he failed to even mention the names of Skip Battin and Gene Parsons yet he spent a full paragraph analysing every half-ass album prior to the Good Byrds! How can you ignore that regardless of opinion!?

The Byrd
February 22nd, 2016, 07:16 PM
FYI:

Although the Byrds had perfected their blend of folk and rock when their debut single, "Mr. Tambourine Man," topped the charts in mid-1965, it was something of a miracle that the group had managed to coalesce in the first place. Not a single member of the original quintet had extensive experience on electric instruments. Jim McGuinn (he'd change his first name to Roger a few years later), David Crosby, and Gene Clark were all young veterans of both commercial folk-pop troupes and the acoustic coffeehouse scene. They were inspired by the success of the Beatles to mix folk and rock; McGuinn had already been playing Beatles songs acoustically in Los Angeles folk clubs when Clark approached him to form an act, according to subsequent recollections, in the Peter & Gordon style. David Crosby soon joined to make them a trio, and they made a primitive demo as the Jet Set that was nonetheless bursting with promise. With the help of session musicians, they released a single on Elektra as the Beefeaters that, while a flop, showed them getting quite close to the folk-rock sound that would electrify the pop scene in a few months.

The Beefeaters, soon renamed the Byrds, were fleshed out to a quintet with the addition of drummer Michael Clarke and bluegrass mandolinist Chris Hillman, who was enlisted to play electric bass, although he had never played the instrument before. The band was so lacking in equipment in their early stages that Clarke played on cardboard boxes during their first rehearsals, but they determined to master their instruments and become a full-fledged rock band (many demos from this period would later surface for official release). They managed to procure a demo of a new Dylan song, "Mr. Tambourine Man"; by eliminating some verses and adding instantly memorable 12-string guitar leads and Beatlesque harmonies, they came up with the first big folk-rock smash (though the Beau Brummels and others had begun exploring similar territory as well). For the "Mr. Tambourine Man" single, the band's vocals and McGuinn's inimitable Rickenbacker were backed by session musicians, although the band themselves (contrary to some widely circulated rumors) performed on their subsequent recordings.

Mr. Tambourine Man The first long-haired American group to compete with the British Invasion bands visually as well as musically, the Byrds were soon anointed as the American counterpart to the Beatles by the press, legions of fans, and George Harrison himself. Their 1965 debut LP, Mr. Tambourine Man, was a fabulous album that mixed stellar interpretations of Dylan and Pete Seeger tunes with strong, more romantic and pop-based originals, usually written by Gene Clark in the band's early days. A few months later, their version of Seeger's "Turn! Turn! Turn!" became another number-one hit and instant classic, featuring more great chiming guitar lines and ethereal, interweaving harmonies. While their second LP (Turn! Turn! Turn!) wasn't as strong as their debut full-length, the band continued to move forward at a dizzying pace. In early 1966, the "Eight Miles High" single heralded the birth of psychedelia, with its drug-like (intentionally or otherwise) lyrical imagery, rumbling bassline, and a frenzied McGuinn guitar solo that took its inspiration from John Coltrane and Indian music.
Fifth Dimension The Byrds suffered a major loss right after "Eight Miles High" with the departure of Gene Clark, their primary songwriter and, along with McGuinn, chief lead vocalist. The reason for his resignation, ironically, was fear of flying, although other pressures were at work as well. "Eight Miles High," amazingly, would be their last Top 20 single; many radio stations banned the record for its alleged drug references, halting its progress at number 14. This ended the Byrds' brief period as commercial challengers to the Beatles, but they regrouped impressively in the face of the setbacks. With the band continuing as a quartet, McGuinn, Crosby, and Hillman would assume a much larger (actually, the entire) chunk of the songwriting responsibilities. The third album, Fifth Dimension, contained more groundbreaking folk-rock and psychedelia on tracks like "Fifth Dimension," "I See You," and "John Riley," although it (like several of their classic early albums) mixed sheer brilliance with tracks that were oddly half-baked or carelessly executed.
Younger Than YesterdayYounger Than Yesterday, (1967) which included the small hits "So You Want to Be a Rock 'n' Roll Star" and "My Back Pages" (another Dylan cover), was another high point, Hillman and Crosby in particular taking their writing to a new level. In 1967, Crosby would assert a much more prominent role in the band, singing and writing some of his best material. He wasn't getting along so well with McGuinn and Hillman, though, and was jettisoned from the Byrds partway into the recording of The Notorious Byrd Brothers. Gene Clark, drafted back into the band as a replacement, left after only a few weeks, and by the end of 1967, Michael Clarke was also gone. Remarkably, in the midst of this chaos (not to mention diminishing record sales), they continued to sound as good as ever on Notorious. This was another effort that mixed electronic experimentation and folk-rock mastery with aplomb, with hints of a growing interest in country music.
Sweetheart of the Rodeo As McGuinn and Hillman rebuilt the group one more time in early 1968, McGuinn mused upon the exciting possibility of a double album that would play as nothing less than a history of contemporary music, evolving from traditional folk and country to jazz and electronic music. Toward this end, he hired Gram Parsons, he has since said, to play keyboards. Under Parsons' influence, however, the Byrds were soon going full blast into country music, with Parsons taking a large share of the guitar and vocal chores. In 1968, McGuinn, Hillman, Parsons, and drummer Kevin Kelly recorded Sweetheart of the Rodeo, which was probably the first album to be widely labeled as country-rock.
Opinions as to the merits of Rodeo remain sharply divided among Byrds fans. Some see it as a natural continuation of the group's innovations; other bewail the loss of the band's trademark crystalline guitar jangle, and the short-circuited potential of McGuinn's most ambitious experiments. However one feels, there's no doubt that it marked the end, or at least a drastic revamping, of the "classic" Byrds sound of the 1965-1968 period (bookended by the Tambourine Man and Notorious albums). Parsons, the main catalyst for the metamorphosis, left the band after about six months, partially in objection to a 1968 Byrds tour of South Africa. It couldn't have helped, though, that McGuinn replaced several of Parsons' lead vocals on Rodeo with his own at the last minute, ostensibly due to contractual obstacles that prevented Parsons from singing on Columbia releases. (Some tracks with Parsons' lead vocals snuck on anyway, and a few others surfaced in the 1990s on the Byrds box set).

Chris Hillman left the Byrds by the end of 1968 to form the Flying Burrito Brothers with Parsons. Although McGuinn kept the Byrds going for about another five years with other musicians (most notably former country picker Clarence White), essentially the Byrds name was a front for Roger McGuinn and backing band. Opinions, again, remain sharply divided about the merits of latter-day Byrds albums. McGuinn was (and is) such an idiosyncratic and pleasurable talent that fans and critics are inclined to give him some slack; no one else plays the 12-string as well, he's a fine arranger, and his Lennon-meets-Dylan vocals are immediately distinctive. Yet aside from some good echoes of vintage Byrds like "Chestnut Mare," "Jesus Is Just Alright," and "Drug Store Truck Drivin' Man," nothing from the post-1968 Byrds albums resonates with nearly the same effervescent quality and authority of their classic 1965-1968 period. This is partly because McGuinn is an erratic (though occasionally fine) songwriter; it's also because the Byrds at their peak were very much a unit of diverse and considerable talents, not just a front for their leader's ideas.

*The black is Unterberger's write-up on The Byrds from 1965-1968*
*The purple is Unterberger's write-up on The Byrds from 1968-1973*

Periphery
February 23rd, 2016, 01:26 AM
This above me post only confirms what Hyper said. That doesn't look too healthy. Not every site that is 'professional' is made by people who know what they are talking about. Deal with the fact not everyone knows everything about a certain band. People make mistakes. Insultinh the guy for making a mistake about a band is not something very smart buddy. That's just downright immature and rude. Grow up and accept the fact nobody. Also, I don't really know why you posted a wall of text from a website to prove he's a cocksucker.

Hyper
February 23rd, 2016, 07:10 AM
Why don't you just make a fansite or whatever and put your own ''version'' out there instead of spending all this energy on some guy you don't personally know and who has done nothing but express his own ''professional opinion''

The internet is full of dumbass professionals, there's plenty of ''legendary critics'' that I think are complete ******* dumbasses as well in regards to some of their opinions. But it doesn't bother me at all.

People that are really interested in music will do their own research, listen to entire discographies or the majority of it and so on.

It's like if I got upset someone doesn't like Judas Priest as much as I do, or thinks that Turbo Lover or Rocknrolla is the greatest priest album, or doesn't agree that Thin Lizzy popularized double solo guitars and so on... I mean there's no reason to get upset, not like it will change the other persons opinion, especially when it comes to music :)

If you really are that into the Byrds, like I said make a fan site, write up all the information you've gathered about them and so on, it would be a bigger resource to those interested in the band or fans like yourself, than a ''professional review'' by any critic who doesn't have the time to go into huge depth with a band or the word count to write down every relevant and interesting detail about a bands output, career and musicians.

The Byrd
February 23rd, 2016, 12:53 PM
This above me post only confirms what Hyper said. That doesn't look too healthy. Not every site that is 'professional' is made by people who know what they are talking about. Deal with the fact not everyone knows everything about a certain band. People make mistakes. Insultinh the guy for making a mistake about a band is not something very smart buddy. That's just downright immature and rude. Grow up and accept the fact nobody. Also, I don't really know why you posted a wall of text from a website to prove he's a cocksucker.

He's touted as a Byrds expert though so he should know their history. He does that for a living. It's difficult to miss out six studio albums, two live albums, and countless bootlegs. I posted that "wall of text" because that's what he wrote. He simply shrugs those six years off in one short paragraph.

Why don't you just make a fansite or whatever and put your own ''version'' out there instead of spending all this energy on some guy you don't personally know and who has done nothing but express his own ''professional opinion''

The internet is full of dumbass professionals, there's plenty of ''legendary critics'' that I think are complete ******* dumbasses as well in regards to some of their opinions. But it doesn't bother me at all.

People that are really interested in music will do their own research, listen to entire discographies or the majority of it and so on.

It's like if I got upset someone doesn't like Judas Priest as much as I do, or thinks that Turbo Lover or Rocknrolla is the greatest priest album, or doesn't agree that Thin Lizzy popularized double solo guitars and so on... I mean there's no reason to get upset, not like it will change the other persons opinion, especially when it comes to music :)

If you really are that into the Byrds, like I said make a fan site, write up all the information you've gathered about them and so on, it would be a bigger resource to those interested in the band or fans like yourself, than a ''professional review'' by any critic who doesn't have the time to go into huge depth with a band or the word count to write down every relevant and interesting detail about a bands output, career and musicians.

I think you're both missing the point. This is supposed to be an OFFICIAL biography. This is one of the main resources for Byrds virgins to come to (no pun intended). It's not a matter of opinion like I said. His job was to write their (unbiased) biography and he misses out over half of their existence and instead decides to insult McGuinn's songwriting. With all due respect to you two, I think it's frankly ridiculous that you're defending this.

Periphery
February 23rd, 2016, 02:28 PM
We never said we were defending him. We both said you were overreacting and should let it go. If I may ask, can I have a link to see if this was professional or not?

The Byrd
February 23rd, 2016, 02:34 PM
We never said we were defending him. We both said you were overreacting and should let it go. If I may ask, can I have a link to see if this was professional or not?

All Music's a legit website. It has it's place for opinion and a biography isn't the place for that. Here's the link: http://www.allmusic.com/artist/the-byrds-mn0000631774/biography

Periphery
February 23rd, 2016, 02:52 PM
All Music's a legit website. It has it's place for opinion and a biography isn't the place for that. Here's the link: http://www.allmusic.com/artist/the-byrds-mn0000631774/biography

Well, just like Hyper said, if you don't agree with it, make your own website. Just like he said, the internet's full of idiots, don't spend your time on them.

Hyper
February 23rd, 2016, 03:32 PM
It's rather ridiculous you are interpeting my responses as ''defending it''

There are no, realistically speaking, unbiased critics anywhere. And he is writing the ''official biography'' for 1 website.

Again there's plenty of dumbass critics and thus plenty of big ''professional'' sites with factually bad info and massively biased info.

I.e metal archives.

And if you still care you could write to allmusic itself and try to get the information changed.

The Byrd
February 23rd, 2016, 03:34 PM
And if you still care you could write to allmusic itself and try to get the information changed.

Good idea :D

Plane And Simple
February 23rd, 2016, 03:40 PM
I've removed a line from the first paragraph which some people might find offensive.