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Splat
February 7th, 2016, 07:07 AM
The past week I've had mock exams and although I did revise and they didn't seem too bad, I realised how much more I need to get in my brain before my GCSE exams start in may.
I've tried everything I can think of - past papers, reading, writing notes / mind maps and cue cards, although I'm not even sure I'm doing them right.

So my question is, how do you prepare for exams? What do you find is the best way to cram all those different subjects in your brain?

Chapperz16
February 7th, 2016, 07:10 AM
One way which my friend used which completely freaked me out was a method called the mind palace. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Method_of_loci It basically involves you taking somewhere you know off by heart i.e. your house and each room contains a subject. Use your imagination to enter that room and inside will be all the topics related to that one subject i.e. History.

He said it worked brilliantly but it does take a lot of work.

Hudor
February 7th, 2016, 09:23 AM
One way which my friend used which completely freaked me out was a method called the mind palace. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Method_of_loci It basically involves you taking somewhere you know off by heart i.e. your house and each room contains a subject. Use your imagination to enter that room and inside will be all the topics related to that one subject i.e. History.

He said it worked brilliantly but it does take a lot of work.

That's actually a brilliant method. I use that except for the night before the exam cramming, in which case use this method.
It is kind of basic but as the course stuff increases, i just concentrate on remembering the text as it written. I read what is written and when i think i have memorized the image of that portion of text, i imagine writing that portion of text down on a page. Either that or i narrate it to myself mentally. Or i carve it onto walls, mentally. I keep changing these but the key is to cement stuff (sort of) inside the mind. At the time of the exam, those snapshots of text i took mentally pop up and help me out.
Ofc it's not fool proof but when i have little time and a lot of course, it works 90-95% of times.

Chapperz16
February 7th, 2016, 09:29 AM
Yea either direct memory or stored memory are the best ways to go. I would not just make posters though as they do not stick in your mind as much. If doing something like ENglish or science then find examples of the topic and make up your own. If maths then just practice like mad haha

Hudor
February 7th, 2016, 09:40 AM
Whoops, i realised i had commented only for specific subjects like history, geography, biology etc.
Don't try to memorize maths. As the user above said, practise as much as possible. Also, i would suggest trying to understand as much course as possible first before you resort to cramming.

Splat
February 7th, 2016, 01:02 PM
One way which my friend used which completely freaked me out was a method called the mind palace. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Method_of_loci It basically involves you taking somewhere you know off by heart i.e. your house and each room contains a subject. Use your imagination to enter that room and inside will be all the topics related to that one subject i.e. History.

He said it worked brilliantly but it does take a lot of work.

Great! I was hoping someone would come up with an extraordinary method that wasn't one of the normal ones that I'd tried and tested (and failed). I may have an issue finding a room for each of the ten subjects but I'm sure I'll find an alternative haha.

That's actually a brilliant method. I use that except for the night before the exam cramming, in which case use this method.
It is kind of basic but as the course stuff increases, i just concentrate on remembering the text as it written. I read what is written and when i think i have memorized the image of that portion of text, i imagine writing that portion of text down on a page. Either that or i narrate it to myself mentally. Or i carve it onto walls, mentally. I keep changing these but the key is to cement stuff (sort of) inside the mind. At the time of the exam, those snapshots of text i took mentally pop up and help me out.
Ofc it's not fool proof but when i have little time and a lot of course, it works 90-95% of times.

Yes, this has been a decent method for remembering a page of a revision guide or science diagrams (eg the heart).


Thank you both! :)

Chapperz16
February 7th, 2016, 01:04 PM
No worries glad I could help :) Nice meeting ya

Endeavour
February 8th, 2016, 11:41 AM
I usually try past papers, that's my revision technique. When I was revising for a french writing controlled assessment, I randomly put the different words around the house, and I had to collect them all up and put them back in a sentence. It took me a while but it worked!

mahony0509
February 8th, 2016, 11:49 AM
Past papers work for me, big time. The same questions come up most of the time, depending on where you at. I find that when it comes to maths and business studies it is better to actually do the exam papers, it helps MASSIVELY.

Splat
February 8th, 2016, 12:00 PM
Past papers work for me, big time. The same questions come up most of the time, depending on where you at. I find that when it comes to maths and business studies it is better to actually do the exam papers, it helps MASSIVELY.

I usually try past papers, that's my revision technique. When I was revising for a french writing controlled assessment, I randomly put the different words around the house, and I had to collect them all up and put them back in a sentence. It took me a while but it worked!


How do you do them? Do you take the topics as an idea to revise or actually do the papers in the time limit?

Endeavour
February 8th, 2016, 12:07 PM
How do you do them? Do you take the topics as an idea to revise or actually do the papers in the time limit?

I usually go on to the exam board website, look through all the past papers, then print the topic questions that I'm struggling with/revising for. That's what works well for me. They have worked quite well for me so far, I've only really been using them properly since the start of Year 10.

In English every so often we get a comprehension task, and in the new GCSE you're meant to complete them in an hour. I just see how far I get in the hour, and how much more I have to complete. I have slowly got better with time :)

mahony0509
February 8th, 2016, 12:34 PM
How do you do them? Do you take the topics as an idea to revise or actually do the papers in the time limit?

I'm not sure how it is in the GCSEs, but here we read the chapter/notes first then complete the most common questions that come up from the papers. An idea for before the actual exam would be to do an actual exam paper in exam conditions.