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DanielRogue
February 10th, 2014, 12:58 PM
So I've had Cyclothymic Disorder for about 4 months. It like a mild bipolar disorder. I've been diagnosed and gotten some whacked up meds cuz of it but does anyone have any tips on like keeping you emotions under wraps? Thanks :woot::woot:

Syvelocin
February 11th, 2014, 10:39 AM
I think the first part of dealing with your emotions is to be able to step back and identify what you're feeling. Be able to say "this is my disorder making me feel this way," and react accordingly. Exercise is one of my coping mechanisms, along with music. Most recently, I've learned to talk myself down, depending on the current emotion. For instance, with my irritable mania I might remind myself that I always get really worked up, but I'm always perfectly fine in the morning and can't even understand what made me so upset. It's really just a lot of trial and error to see what coping mechanisms work best for you. Keeping trying until you find the one that clicks with you.

elmoc
February 26th, 2014, 03:10 PM
I think the first part of dealing with your emotions is to be able to step back and identify what you're feeling. Be able to say "this is my disorder making me feel this way," and react accordingly. Exercise is one of my coping mechanisms, along with music. Most recently, I've learned to talk myself down, depending on the current emotion. For instance, with my irritable mania I might remind myself that I always get really worked up, but I'm always perfectly fine in the morning and can't even understand what made me so upset. It's really just a lot of trial and error to see what coping mechanisms work best for you. Keeping trying until you find the one that clicks with you.

This is OUTSTANDING advice! I have participated in personal counseling, as well as helping to start a teen peer counseling group @ my school. When you combine adolescent hormones, peer & societal pressure, school, & then toss in a slight variation in brain chemistry, identifying my feelings has become my best mechanism for keeping things in perspective. I am not always successful, but when I can determine if I am upset because I am
1. embarrassed
2. annoyed
3. anxious
4. etc, etc

THEN I can begin to respond in a manner that is proportional to the matter at hand. Otherwise, it is easy for me to over react over something comparatively minor, when my emotions remain unidentified/unresolved over something that happened an hour ago.

From my perspective, identifying my true feelings about something can be a challenge when bombarded with a high stress day.

As my counselor told me, "many people will state that they know exactly how they feel, & why they are responding in a certain way, but they are often VERY surprised when I work with them to identify the true origin of their anger.

Karkat
February 27th, 2014, 07:34 PM
I think the first part of dealing with your emotions is to be able to step back and identify what you're feeling. Be able to say "this is my disorder making me feel this way," and react accordingly. Exercise is one of my coping mechanisms, along with music. Most recently, I've learned to talk myself down, depending on the current emotion. For instance, with my irritable mania I might remind myself that I always get really worked up, but I'm always perfectly fine in the morning and can't even understand what made me so upset. It's really just a lot of trial and error to see what coping mechanisms work best for you. Keeping trying until you find the one that clicks with you.

This is OUTSTANDING advice! I have participated in personal counseling, as well as helping to start a teen peer counseling group @ my school. When you combine adolescent hormones, peer & societal pressure, school, & then toss in a slight variation in brain chemistry, identifying my feelings has become my best mechanism for keeping things in perspective. I am not always successful, but when I can determine if I am upset because I am
1. embarrassed
2. annoyed
3. anxious
4. etc, etc

THEN I can begin to respond in a manner that is proportional to the matter at hand. Otherwise, it is easy for me to over react over something comparatively minor, when my emotions remain unidentified/unresolved over something that happened an hour ago.

From my perspective, identifying my true feelings about something can be a challenge when bombarded with a high stress day.

As my counselor told me, "many people will state that they know exactly how they feel, & why they are responding in a certain way, but they are often VERY surprised when I work with them to identify the true origin of their anger.

Both of these are excellent advice. I was kind of halfheartedly diagnosed with "possible bipolar", but they didn't feel it was severe enough to warrant a firm diagnosis/medication (they didn't want to medicate me for a few reasons). I might bring this up to my current therapist, and see if he thinks it's this, or actual bipolar. My symptoms have gotten more intense in the 3 years since, and I was pretty young at the time, so who knows.

elmoc
June 7th, 2014, 01:14 PM
Ren,

I think you have a good plan. In 3 years, a lot can happen to our maturing bodies & brains. A thorough evaluation is an excellent way to objectively determine how you are doing.

In my case, my 3 best friends know of my diagnosis. If I start acting hypomanic (my parents helped educate them about my triggers) we have a code word that they say. When they use that word, it tells me that I need to mentally step back, evaluate my behavior, & decide if I need to take it down a notch or two.

No, I don't always heed their warning, but sometimes it works. (BTW, my code word is "Wolverine." When they work that word into a conversation, even with 20 people around, I know it is meant for me).

Taking care of yourself & trusting friends & loved ones is the only way that I know to function within the spectrum of "normal."

Karkat
June 12th, 2014, 09:39 AM
Ren,

I think you have a good plan. In 3 years, a lot can happen to our maturing bodies & brains. A thorough evaluation is an excellent way to objectively determine how you are doing.

In my case, my 3 best friends know of my diagnosis. If I start acting hypomanic (my parents helped educate them about my triggers) we have a code word that they say. When they use that word, it tells me that I need to mentally step back, evaluate my behavior, & decide if I need to take it down a notch or two.

No, I don't always heed their warning, but sometimes it works. (BTW, my code word is "Wolverine." When they work that word into a conversation, even with 20 people around, I know it is meant for me).

Taking care of yourself & trusting friends & loved ones is the only way that I know to function within the spectrum of "normal."

Oh, I've since been diagnosed with bipolar (1). I'm on meds, but they aren't helping a ton. I mean, it's a start, but I feel like I can't fully tell my doctor what the deal is with my emotions, partially because mom is in the room, and partially because I keep certain things out of conversation with anyone who could jeopardize my contact with my boyfriend, or take me from my mom. Suicidal thoughts, self-harm, substance abuse, sexual contact, running away, etc. (which is always what the worst parts of my episodes are centered around) are kept secret.

I was going to a therapist, but he didn't know much about bipolar, so I stopped going to him, and we're trying to set me up with a psychiatrist. Unfortunately, my life is chaotic even without all the 'secret' stuff, so that could take a looong time.

I don't leave the house, so I can't even pretend to function "normally" :/