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Sailor Mars
December 25th, 2015, 10:09 PM
Recently tryna get more into readin cuz i got a book for Christmas so

From Fahrenheit 451, a book that is fucking wild, I present to you several quotes that I love:

"Don't ask for guarantees. And don't look to be saved in any one thing, person, machine, or library. Do your own bit of saving, and if you drown, at least die knowing you were headed for shore."

"I don't talk things, sir, I talk the meaning of things. I sit here and know I'm alive."

"We cannot tell the precise moment when friendship is formed. As in filling a vessel drop by drop, there is at last a drop which makes it run over; so in a series of kindness there is at least one which makes the heart run over."

So what are some quotes from the most recent book you've read that are inspirational or just stick out to you?

Kahn
December 27th, 2015, 12:18 AM
"Four blind men went to the zoo and visited the elephant. One blind man touched its side and said, 'the elephant is like a wall.' One blind man touched its trunk and said, 'the elephant is like a snake.' The next blind man touched its leg and said, 'the elephant is like a column.' The last blind man touched its tail and said, 'the elephant is like a broom.' Then the four blind men started to fight, each one believing his opinion was the right one. Each only understood the part that he had touched; none of them understood the whole."

amgb
January 20th, 2016, 06:17 AM
"Often we realise how mistaken we were in concepts we knew so well; they had become part of us and, automatically, of our consciousness. Every so often we ought to change all our concepts."

Cristina15
March 18th, 2016, 04:39 PM
"don't esitate, do it!"

I am esitating everytime :)

Faith Collapsing
July 4th, 2016, 09:14 PM
“God does not play dice with the universe; He plays an ineffable game of His own devising, which might be compared, from the perspective of any of the other players [i.e. everybody], to being involved in an obscure and complex variant of poker in a pitch-dark room, with blank cards, for infinite stakes, with a Dealer who won't tell you the rules, and who smiles all the time.”
-Good Omens

Sublime Demonz
July 4th, 2016, 10:13 PM
"We accept the love we think we deserve."

"So, this is my life. And I want you to know that I am both happy and sad and I'm still trying to figure out how that could be."

“So, I guess we are who we are for alot of reasons. And maybe we'll never know most of them. But even if we don't have the power to choose where we come from, we can still choose where we go from there. We can still do things. And we can try to feel okay about them.”

“I don’t know if you’ve ever felt like that. That you wanted to sleep for a thousand years. Or just not exist. Or just not be aware that you do exist. Or something like that. I think wanting that is very morbid, but I want it when I get like this. That’s why I’m trying not to think. I just want it all to stop spinning.”

All from The Perks Of Being A Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky, one of my favorite books and movies of all time.

Faith Collapsing
July 19th, 2016, 03:40 PM
"Memory is the great deceiver. Perhaps there are some individuals whose memories act like tape recordings, daily records of their lives complete in every detail, but I am not one of them. My memory is a patchwork of occurrences, of discontinuous events roughly sewn together: The parts I remember, I remember precisely, whilst other sections seemed to have vanished completely.”

Smoke And Mirrors-Neil Gaiman

Flapjack
July 19th, 2016, 05:12 PM
Alkaloids are natural fungicides, insecticides, and pesticides. It has been estimated that, on average, each of us ingests about a gram and a half of natural pesticide every day, from the plants and plant products in our diet. The estimate for residues from synthetic pesticides is around 0.15 milligrams daily—about ten thousand times less than the natural dose!
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81nBxkCSaBL.jpg

Faith Collapsing
July 27th, 2016, 03:08 PM
“No motive is pure. No one is good or bad-but a hearty mix of both. And sometimes life actually gives to you by taking away.”
― Carrie Fisher, Wishful Drinking

Sailor Mars
September 20th, 2016, 07:55 AM
"For it will be very difficult to persuade men of sense that he who with dry eyes and satisfaction of mind can delivery his brother to the executioner to be burnt alive, does sincerely and hearing concern himself to save that brother from the flames of hell in world to come."

"To love truth for truths same is the principal part of human perfection in this world, and th seed-plot of all other virtues."

"The great question which, in all ages, has disturbed mankind, and brought on them the greatest part of their mischiefs ... Has been, not whether be power in the world, not whence it came, but who should have it."

"Education behind the gentleman, but reading, good company and reflection must finish him."

"To prejudge other men's notions before we have looked into them is not to show their darkness but to put out our own eyes."

John Locke is fucking legend.

lemondrop
September 20th, 2016, 02:49 PM
"I'm neither a slave, nor a king , just a human"

Sailor Mars
November 29th, 2016, 10:37 AM
"Trust is one of those abstract words that is hard for me to understand."

Sailor Mars
December 4th, 2016, 12:56 PM
"There is no heaven, and there is no hell. There doesn't need to be. Our hubris is the quintessential form of retribution. We create our own suffering."

everlong
December 4th, 2016, 06:25 PM
Well the last book I read was the Scarlett Letter, and it's a fucking awful book, so I don't think I could find a good quote.

Falcons_11
December 10th, 2016, 12:05 AM
I recently finished reading James Bradley's book "Flyboys". It's a non-fiction account about the air war in the Pacific in World War II. It's the personal stories of many of the actual fighter pilots both Navy and Army who flew againt the Japanese. In this book the author goes to great lengths to tell the story of the daily routines of the pilots and flight personnel who fought in this war. The following is a little poem that went around the ready rooms on every U.S. aircraft carriers. It points out one of the cruel truths about what went through the minds of the aviators in this war.

" He loved his plane
And he loved to fly.

He never thought
He was going to die.

Now don't feel bad
Don't feel blue.

Who knows tomorrow
It may be you."

pageninetynine
December 24th, 2016, 05:12 PM
"We realise that we’re all going to die, without really finding out the big answers. We develop all those long-winded ideas which just interpret the reality of our lives in different ways, without really extending our body of worthwhile knowledge, about the big things, the real things. Basically, we live a short disappointing life; and then we die. We fill up our lives with shite, things like careers and relationships to delude ourselves that it isn’t all totally pointless." - Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh.

Phosphene
January 12th, 2017, 10:21 PM
"It is difficult for most people to realize, especially parents when it comes to their children, but suffering is often a great gift, not the curse most humans assume it is."

Sailor Mars
January 14th, 2017, 07:50 PM
"Time is but a stream I go a-fishing in. I drink at it; but while I drink I see the sandy bottom and detect how shallow it is. It's thin current slides away, but eternity remains. I would drink deeper; fish in the sky, whose bottom is pebbly with starts. I cannot count one."

Sailor Mars
May 30th, 2017, 09:18 AM
"Now I think we are friends, this girl and me. On her birthday, it was she who gave a gift- to me. It makes me understand that the best standover man I've ever known is not a man at all..."

~The Book Thief
-Markus Zusak

“On the last night, James said he obtained five large scorpions but rather than mashing them into the usual, boring arthropod paste, he used a fuel tablet from his survival kit to roast the batch of five critters. Then he dabbed each crusty carapace with several drops of precious Tabasco that he had saved for the last night.
“Now that was some fine dining, the likes of which you other fellas will never know,” he said, rolling a toothpick between his lips while a grin crept out.”

~Life Under Open Skies
-Tony Nester

Lemme just revive this thread right quick :)

The Byrd
June 1st, 2017, 03:52 AM
"Man is not truly one, but truly two" - Henry Jekyll, 'The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde''

Nadin
June 19th, 2017, 06:01 AM
“It sounds plausible enough tonight, but wait until tomorrow. Wait for the common sense of the morning.”

H.G.Wells

Sailor Mars
June 27th, 2017, 06:57 PM
"You have to have faith, but stupidity is not a virtue."

The Scholar Warrior
~Deng Ming-Dao

"He went to the duel, and when the moment came, he did not even bother to block the fatal stroke. The poem he left behind made all the other Scholar Warriors weep:

'In youth, a leaf on the tree:
Fresh, vibrant, beautiful.
In old age, a leaf in the mud:
Ground unnoticed beneath the heel.' "

The Scholar Warrior
~Deng Ming-Dao

Poem
~Unknown master

sgtcactus
July 8th, 2017, 03:59 PM
"Oh freddled gruntbuggly
Thy micturations are to me
As plurdled gabbleblotchits on a lurgid bee.
Group, I implore thee,
My footing turlingdromes
And hooptiously drangle me with crinkly bindlewurdles.
Or I will rend thee in the gobberwarts
With my blurglecruncheon, see if I don't!"

Sublime Demonz
July 9th, 2017, 12:40 PM
"Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something, and I asked Miss Maudie about it. "Your father's right," she said. "Mockingbirds don't do one thing except make music for us to enjoy."

To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee

Seraph
July 11th, 2017, 10:14 AM
"'Why, O people of the Noldor,' he cried, 'why should we longer serve the jealous Valar, who cannot keep us nor even their own realm secure from their Enemy? And though he be now their foe, are not they and he of one kin? Vengeance calls me hence, but even were it otherwise I would not dwell longer in the same land with the kin of my father's slayer and of the thief of my treasure. Yet I am not the only valiant in this valiant people. And have ye not all lost your King? And what else have ye not lost, cooped here in a narrow land between the mountains and the sea?

'Here once was light, that the Valar begrudged to Middle-earth, but now dark levels all. Shall we mourn here deedless for ever, a shadow-folk, mist-haunting, dropping vain tears in the thankless sea? Or shall we return to our home? In Cuiviénen sweet ran the waters under unclouded stars, and wide lands lay about, where a free people might walk. There they lie still and await us who in our folly forsook them. Come away! Let the cowards keep this city!'"

-- The Silmarillion.

carlieta
July 15th, 2017, 01:11 AM
i was reading spiderman, so "with great power comes great responsibility" haha

Sailor Mars
July 17th, 2017, 12:18 PM
"It is evening rush hour. Traffic is heavy but moving steadily. Long lines of cars are carrying tired people home. Home. That is the magnet atttacting nearly all the people in the traffic stream - family, a relaxed, evening meal, and the simple enjoyment of home."

Sportsmanlike Driving - Fourth edition

Sailor Mars
August 25th, 2017, 07:39 PM
"The failure to accord the individual human being full dignity is a calamitous failure. Conversely, the recognition of the need for that dignity is what makes society workable and livable."

"The individual is capable of ennobling life and disfiguring it. Basic purpose and human destiny are not without but within."

"Our definition of hell that has presided over the years is of a place where people have lost their capacity to recognize or respond to beauty."

"Certain rights are acquired by a human being just in the act of being born:
The right to grow and to meet one's individual potentialities.
The right to appraise and to apply one's abilities, consistent with the rights of others.
The right to one's thoughts.
The right to nourish them and voice them.
The right to make mistakes whether of thought or deed, without fear of unjust punishment.
The right to hope.
The right to justice whether the claim is against a person, an aggregation, or government itself.
The right to contemplate human destiny and the mysteries of human existence, or to detach oneself altogether from these pursuits.
The right to hold grievances against one's society and to make them known to others.
The right to make a better life for our young.

The Human Adventure: A Camera Chronicle - Norman Cousins

Sword of the morning
September 18th, 2017, 10:55 PM
A reader lives a thousand loves before his ends. A man who never reads only live one.

Tom_theflash
September 21st, 2017, 07:04 PM
"No one ever became extremely wicked suddenly". -
'Saturae' by Giovenale.

Sailor Mars
October 19th, 2017, 11:23 AM
"Dawn unlocked the morning in increments of gray."

"The essence of intelligence was to know when, or if, to expose even the heart's deep need for instruction."

Transatlantic - Colum McCann

Sailor Mars
November 3rd, 2017, 01:04 PM
“...any mans death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind. And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.”

No Man Is An Island - John Donne

Sailor Mars
January 7th, 2018, 06:49 PM
“There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered.”

Nelson Mandela, A Long Walk to Freedom

Sailor Mars
January 9th, 2018, 11:09 AM
“Is it because we’re having so much fun at home we’ve forgotten the world? Is it because we’re so rich and the rest of the world’s so poor and we just don’t care if they are?”

Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Pat the Bunny
January 9th, 2018, 02:23 PM
gonna just copy over an entire short story. this book (Calculating How Big Of A Tip To Give Is The Easiest Thing In The World Shoutout To My Family And Friends by Steve Roggenbuck) is all I've been reading for the last month or more, just rereading the stories over and over.

the time is 7:06 a.m.
wow
silent morning hour's
it is arguably the closest time to the impossible but most satanic
time of day
6:66 a.m.
suddenly marina wake's from the longest sleep of her lief (~7
hours)
and looks directly up and screams "ITS TIME TO LIVE MY
LIEFFFFFFFF"
immediately 4 clown's break into the room and start
masturbating flipantly while skipping around the room yodeling
and screaming
marina picks up a sawed-off shotgun from her night stand and
shoot's it directly upward 5 times,
sudenly a black and white cow enters the room and start's
levitating into the middle of the air
the cow has the head of an extremely large human toddler, not
a cow's head
suddnely
everything freezes
and a white light
start's emanateing from the center of the cow
it grows stronger and stronger, pulsing outward thru the skin of
the cow
until the room is completely plasterd in white light
then
keanu reeve's walks into the room
he is holding a memory card from an N64
he says "when i was 22 year's old i saved my game on 007
Golden eye at the exact moment before my character got killed
by the small but ruthless villain Oddjob . whenever i need a
reminder that humen lief is fleeting, that everything is temporary
and most of the processes at work in the universe are beyond
my control, i load this game"
keanu then start' s crying
by now the white light of the cow has almost completely
enveloped keanu as well
"we dont have that long together.
i wish we had longer"
the white light take's him,
and he is gone
the end

Sailor Mars
January 23rd, 2018, 05:17 PM
It's not really a "book", but it is the last thing I read.

"The world is very different now. For man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life. And yet the same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still at issue around the globe--the belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God.
We dare not forget today that we are the heirs of that first revolution. Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans--born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage--and unwilling to witness or permit the slow undoing of those human rights to which this nation has always been committed, and to which we are committed today at home and around the world.
Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.
This much we pledge--and more.
To those old allies whose cultural and spiritual origins we share, we pledge the loyalty of faithful friends. United, there is little we cannot do in a host of cooperative ventures. Divided, there is little we can do--for we dare not meet a powerful challenge at odds and split asunder.
To those new states whom we welcome to the ranks of the free, we pledge our word that one form of colonial control shall not have passed away merely to be replaced by a far more iron tyranny. We shall not always expect to find them supporting our view. But we shall always hope to find them strongly supporting their own freedom-and to remember that, in the past, those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside.
To those peoples in the huts and villages of half the globe struggling to break the bonds of mass misery, we pledge our best efforts to help them help themselves, for whatever period is required--not because the communists may be doing it, not because we seek their votes, but because it is right. If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich.
To our sister republics south of our border, we offer a special pledge--to convert our good words into good deeds--in a new alliance for progress--to assist free men and free governments in casting off the chains of poverty. But this peaceful revolution of hope cannot become the prey of hostile powers. Let all our neighbors know that we shall join with them to oppose aggression or subversion anywhere in the Americas. And let every other power know that this Hemisphere intends to remain the master of its own house.
To that world assembly of sovereign states, the United Nations, our last best hope in an age where the instruments of war have far outpaced the instruments of peace, we renew our pledge of support--to prevent it from becoming merely a forum for invective--to strengthen its shield of the new and the weak--and to enlarge the area in which its writ may run.
Finally, to those nations who would make themselves our adversary, we offer not a pledge but a request: that both sides begin anew the quest for peace, before the dark powers of destruction unleashed by science engulf all humanity in planned or accidental self-destruction.

We dare not tempt them with weakness. For only when our arms are sufficient beyond doubt can we be certain beyond doubt that they will never be employed.
But neither can two great and powerful groups of nations take comfort from our present course--both sides overburdened by the cost of modern weapons, both rightly alarmed by the steady spread of the deadly atom, yet both racing to alter that uncertain balance of terror that stays the hand of mankind's final war.
So let us begin anew--remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate.
Let both sides explore what problems unite us instead of belaboring those problems which divide us.
Let both sides, for the first time, formulate serious and precise proposals for the inspection and control of arms--and bring the absolute power to destroy other nations under the absolute control of all nations.
Let both sides seek to invoke the wonders of science instead of its terrors. Together let us explore the stars, conquer the deserts, eradicate disease, tap the ocean depths and encourage the arts and commerce.
Let both sides unite to heed in all corners of the earth the command of Isaiah--to "undo the heavy burdens . . . (and) let the oppressed go free."
And if a beach-head of cooperation may push back the jungle of suspicion, let both sides join in creating a new endeavor, not a new balance of power, but a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved.
All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this Administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. But let us begin.
In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each generation of Americans has been summoned to give testimony to its national loyalty. The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.
Now the trumpet summons us again-not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need--not as a call to battle, though embattled we are--but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation"--a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war itself.
Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?

In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility--I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it--and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.
And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country.
My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.

John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Address

Sailor Mars
January 31st, 2018, 10:13 AM
”I used to talk this matter of slavery over with them. I would sometimes say to them, I wished I could be as free as they would be when they got to be men. “You will be free as soon as you are twenty-one, but I am a slave for life! Have not I as good a right to be free as you have?” These words used to trouble them...”

“It was heard in every sound, and seen in every wretched condition. It was ever present to torment me with a sense of my wretched condition. I saw nothing without seeing it, I heard nothing without hearing it, and felt nothing without feeling it. It looked from every star, it smiled in every calm, and breathed in every wing, and moved in every storm.”

Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Sailor Mars
March 19th, 2018, 09:30 AM
“I will no longer be made to feel ashamed of existing. I will have my voice: Indian, Spanish, white. I will have my serpent’s tongue - my woman’s voice, my sexual voice, my poet’s voice. I will overcome the tradition of silence.”

“Wild tongues can’t be tamed, they can only be cut out.”

Gloria Anzaldúa, How to Tame a Wild Tongue

“Who is to say that robbing a people of its language is less violent than war?”

Ray Gwyn Smith, Moorland Is Cold Country, unpublished book

Sailor Mars
August 1st, 2018, 08:35 PM
“Victorio left behind no letters, no journals, no speeches or statements to the press. Maybe he dreamed of victory and a final, lasting peace, a return to his home at the warm springs. Maybe he suspected his resistance was a suicide mission. Maybe he spoke of an honorable death, a noble defeat. Maybe, consumed by survival in the present, he spoke not at all of the future. Maybe he knew he had no future.”

“Soon the flames play on the tower’s steel frame and throw weird shadows on the trees. Stories come to me, the voices of friends, some of them memories from nights around this very fire pit, nights of ribaldry and revelry, food and laughter, hand-rolled cigarettes, tall tales.”

“On the second of July a storm comes over just past dark, lightning on all sides, some within 400 yards. Inside the cabin I cringe every few seconds as the strikes arc and strobe in the smoky-looking fog. They seem to come in a spectrum of colors, blue and pink and yellow and white, and some of them strike repeatedly in the same spot, two or three jolts to a single tree. The thunder sounds like artillery fires from the ridge tops below me. In the morning I find trees on the edge of the meadow shorn of bark in the classic corkscrew pattern, splinters the size of swords nearby on the ground — but not one inch of charred wood.”

“I no longer find sustenance in sweeping vistas but in the profusion of new color at my feet. All around a fiesta of wildflowers has burst into color: yarrow, fleabane, scarlet penstemon, skyrocket gilia, cliff primrose, Indian paintbrush, mountain wood sorrel, dozens of others. The unease, the sadness, the almost instantaneous nostalgia for events as they happen — each day on the mountain now elicits a wave of feeling centered around the knowledge that my stay here cannot last.”

“I sit behind her as she sits Indian style, my arms wrapped around her, both of us silent, eyes drawn to the mesmerizing flames of the bonfire, the night around us cool and calm, the dog curled up in the meadows nearby, the starts gone crazy in a moonless sky, our future unknown but our present no way other than we’d wish it.”

“In the night I come as close to as I’ve ever come to prayer. More hope than prayer, in the end, but fervent in the way we think of the desperate and prayerful. I wish for the fawn to be wild, to run in high mountain meadows under moonlight, to feel the cold splash of crossing a creek in autumn. To know desire, pleasure, pain. To at least be given a chance. A life. Not merely birth and death.”

“My radio remains quiet. I sit on the porch and watch the fawn’s torso rise and fall with each breath. In its last moments of strength the dawn lies on its side and gallops in place, all four legs churning like pistons, like a dream of running. It’s cries grow louder, higher pitched, more insistent. Then all of the sudden it is still.”

“One evening I’m cookinf dinner over the stove’s blue flame when I look up and see, through the west-facing windows, two bull elk with their muzzles to the ground in the meadow. They are massive, majestic, the muscles in their hindquarters rippling as they shift their weight. One of them lifts his regal head and seems to look at me, his antlers stark against the gray sky; he shakes his jowls and returns to his grazing. I slip out the door and sneak around the corner of the cabin. When they hear me coming they look up, crouch slightly, then bolt, their hooves thundering down the mountainside. My blood races. Their musk hangs heavy in the air.”

Phillip Connors, Fire Season: Field Notes From A Wilderness Lookout

Phosphene
August 1st, 2018, 08:55 PM
"Yes, but what about the firemen, then?" asked Montag.
"Ah." Beatty leaned forward in the faint mist of smoke from his pipe. "What more easily explained and natural? With school turning out more runners, jumpers, racers, tinkerers, grabbers, snatchers, fliers, and swimmers instead of examiners, critics, knowers, and imaginative creators, the word "intellectual", of course, became the swear word it deserved to be. You always dread the unfamiliar. Surely you remember the boy in your own school class who was exceptionally 'bright', did most of the reciting and answering while the others sat like so many leaden idols, hating him. And wasn't it this bright boy you selected for beatings and tortures after hours? Of course it was. We must all be alike. Not everyone born free and equal, as the Constitution says, but everyone made equal. Each man the image of every other; then all are happy, for there are no mountains to make them cower, to judge themselves against. So! A book is a loaded gun in the house next door. Burn it. Take the shot from the weapon. Break man's mind. Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man? Me? I won't stomach them for a minute. And so when houses were finally fireproofed completely, all over the world (you were correct in your assumption the other night) there was no longer need for firemen for the old purposes. They were given the new job, as custodians of our peace of mind, the focus of our understandable and rightful dread of being inferior; official censors, judges, and executors. That's you, Montag, and that's me."

Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Sailor Mars
August 1st, 2018, 10:36 PM
"Yes, but what about the firemen, then?" asked Montag.
"Ah." Beatty leaned forward in the faint mist of smoke from his pipe. "What more easily explained and natural? With school turning out more runners, jumpers, racers, tinkerers, grabbers, snatchers, fliers, and swimmers instead of examiners, critics, knowers, and imaginative creators, the word "intellectual", of course, became the swear word it deserved to be. You always dread the unfamiliar. Surely you remember the boy in your own school class who was exceptionally 'bright', did most of the reciting and answering while the others sat like so many leaden idols, hating him. And wasn't it this bright boy you selected for beatings and tortures after hours? Of course it was. We must all be alike. Not everyone born free and equal, as the Constitution says, but everyone made equal. Each man the image of every other; then all are happy, for there are no mountains to make them cower, to judge themselves against. So! A book is a loaded gun in the house next door. Burn it. Take the shot from the weapon. Break man's mind. Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man? Me? I won't stomach them for a minute. And so when houses were finally fireproofed completely, all over the world (you were correct in your assumption the other night) there was no longer need for firemen for the old purposes. They were given the new job, as custodians of our peace of mind, the focus of our understandable and rightful dread of being inferior; official censors, judges, and executors. That's you, Montag, and that's me."

Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Amazing book!!!! Read it three times :D