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View Full Version : Writing from two Point of View (POV)


AnthonyCBS
December 20th, 2015, 03:33 AM
I have been writing a book for more than a year now, each time I complete it, I would rewrite it. But my main problem is that I want to write in the POV of two people. Kinda like Rick Riordan did in his Kane Chronicles and Heroes of Olympus story. But I keep wondering if people would like it like this, would this be too confusing? Also I don't know when to switch to who, I don't know how many chapters can one character have each turn. I would write with only one POV but I can't express both characters, who have very different personalities.

Can anyone give me some advice?

JavierDolan
December 20th, 2015, 03:37 AM
I think the exact thing you're looking for is what Gillian Flynn did with Gone Girl. I won't spoil anything just in case you haven't read it (and you should) but she wrote it through the main character (Nick) is written in present tense first person, and his wife (Amy) is written through first person diary entries. Game of Thrones is another good example of having multiple POV's to write from.

Just some suggestions.

AnthonyCBS
December 20th, 2015, 03:46 AM
Thank you, I'll try looking for those books the next time I go to the library.

thatonekidjacob
December 29th, 2015, 02:59 PM
I have been writing a book for more than a year now, each time I complete it, I would rewrite it. But my main problem is that I want to write in the POV of two people. Kinda like Rick Riordan did in his Kane Chronicles and Heroes of Olympus story. But I keep wondering if people would like it like this, would this be too confusing? Also I don't know when to switch to who, I don't know how many chapters can one character have each turn. I would write with only one POV but I can't express both characters, who have very different personalities.

Can anyone give me some advice?

Martin does that in A Song of Ice and Fire (A Game of Thrones) too. it's like he has a bunch of stories going on at the same time. The POV isn't always the main protagonist too. He's crazy!

Doc. Maestro
January 1st, 2016, 12:18 AM
I think what you're looking for is something like the movie "Flipped", correct me if I'm wrong. One story, two points of view, and thus two different stories of the same story. No, it wouldn't be confusing, you just need to make sure that people know which character is talking and when. A good way to do it would be to do a chapter with one character, then swap to another character. If you wish to intertwine their thoughts, perhaps do something fancy like put their dialog in italics and go left right left right to distinguish them.

Exotic Babe
January 1st, 2016, 05:09 AM
Depending on the book itself and how the POVs are written, two people POVs can be either good or bad lol. For example, when there is a girl main character and a boy and the girl keeps wondering whether the boy likes her or not, the reader keeps wondering with her, so in that case, the boy's POV sounds like a bad idea, seeing as it would spoil all his thoughts and would ruin the excitement. Tho I have read a few books like that that were actually quite good. But I've also seen books where there are two girls (usually friends or smth) that have two seperate stories but they intertwine throughout the book so it's interesting to read. And yes, it is also very important to know when and how often to change the POVs. Maybe you could give us an idea about the storyline/the two characters and the relation between them? Imo, it really comes down to that.

Doc. Maestro
January 4th, 2016, 08:44 AM
I agree with Exotic Babe. It depends on what the POVs are intending to focus on and talk about. If it's about mystery, or lack of knowledge and wonder, then it won't work. However, if we're exploring two characters and their thoughts, frustrations, and pressures as they deal with the same situation, then it can make it interesting.

For example: Louise- I just couldn't help it, I had to tell him to go away. I just couldn't, not now, not in front of my friends. They would think I was a loser if they knew, and I couldn't have that, not even for him. I hope he understands, I hope he's not too mad.
Evan- I can't understand, even now! Why? After all we had shared, all that we had done together, on the most important night of our relationship, she rejected me and pushed me away. I can't believe it! I thought she loved me. I guess it was just a prank, a joke, a ruse put together by her and her evil minions. She's dead to me, if I can't have her, then she can't have me.

Obviously very rushed, a crude example, but something like that. Two different sides of the same story, without any sort of tension being built in their obliviousness to the other side, but rather tension in their actions and reactions, and their individual thoughts.