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View Full Version : encountering anorexia in real life, how to help these poor girls?


Miserabilia
June 28th, 2013, 02:45 AM
Okay, so a few days ago I was in the pool, and when standing in line for one of the slides, I saw this:

there were two girls, the oldest looked about 10, the youngest 7/8.
The oldest was extremely underweight, I basicly saw her hair fall out, and she was very pale and bony.
She was talking to the younger girl, and I heard something like
"Yea, I worked really hard to get this hipbone out more"
and then she continued about her chest bones etc....

Its so sad because after that I didnt see them anymore, and theres nothing youc an do to help them.

Anyone ever had a similar experience?

Fiction
June 30th, 2013, 05:07 PM
I've had an eating disorder myself and I went to an eating disorder help group. I was about the same size as most people there but there where some much skinnier, and extremely ill.

I distinctly remember my first visit. I was either 15 or 16 I don't remember, but there was an extremely skinny girl next to me. We where encouraged to talk about all sorts of stuff and She started to talk to us about how she'd been told if she continued how she was she'd end up dead within the next year. She was 13. It was horrible.

Another thing I distinctly remember from those groups is one girl just completely breaking down and staring at one fixed point, crying and unable to talk because we had been talking about weight etc I think that really pin points the emotional problems eating disorders bring. Something you can't see from someone being thin.

In the end I had to stop going to those groups. It triggered me too much.

Miserabilia
July 1st, 2013, 01:20 AM
I've had an eating disorder myself and I went to an eating disorder help group. I was about the same size as most people there but there where some much skinnier, and extremely ill.

I distinctly remember my first visit. I was either 15 or 16 I don't remember, but there was an extremely skinny girl next to me. We where encouraged to talk about all sorts of stuff and She started to talk to us about how she'd been told if she continued how she was she'd end up dead within the next year. She was 13. It was horrible.

Another thing I distinctly remember from those groups is one girl just completely breaking down and staring at one fixed point, crying and unable to talk because we had been talking about weight etc I think that really pin points the emotional problems eating disorders bring. Something you can't see from someone being thin.

In the end I had to stop going to those groups. It triggered me too much.

Aw that sounds terrible ):

I guess anorexia is more and more common in younger ages?

Overture Libra
July 1st, 2013, 12:44 PM
I've never had a public incident like that, but I have known someone for some time that had an eating disorder...It was torture for me because words can't do everything. She always had to tell me in detail how she would stick a toothbrush down her throat regularly and that she wanted to be skinny.

It was something I just couldn't stand and it hurt on the inside because of how helpless I felt. Insecurity has to be so complex like that. While I've never had to deal with it myself, I'd imagine that it's all rooted at the negativity that's thrown at them about their looks, so I think the only way you could really help is if you just did your part in proving the insults wrong. Just simply treating someone with the condition with respect, giving attention, and showing no signs of being weirded out and just treat them normally.

And to answer your question.. I think it's starting to be with the spread of social media at such an alarming rate, which contributes to a constantly changing culture. With the usual figures of great celebrities, women on magazine covers, and idols that girls look up to, they want to be just like them. Although I'm pretty sure at first they don't try to lose weight, it's the fact that there will always be the harsh and hurtful people out there that throw words around like they're toys. Careless guys call them fat and the more people that contribute to that statement, the more and more negativity goes into it. Then girls associate the word "skinny" with the word "beautiful", when that's certainly not the case at all.

Oh, and another thing that contributes to that is that back in May when I went on a field trip to a museum, there was a group of kids that looked to be in the 8-10 age range, and there were girls that were wearing short shorts. It just shows more and more that kids at younger and younger ages are trying to conform to the "acceptable" image that others want, like to gain their approval or something. ._.

katiebearr
July 1st, 2013, 08:15 PM
Aw that sounds terrible ):

I guess anorexia is more and more common in younger ages?

It's most common in ages 16 to 20 but can strike anyone of any age/gender.

But what you heard does sound terrible.

Miserabilia
July 2nd, 2013, 01:52 AM
I've never had a public incident like that, but I have known someone for some time that had an eating disorder...It was torture for me because words can't do everything. She always had to tell me in detail how she would stick a toothbrush down her throat regularly and that she wanted to be skinny.

It was something I just couldn't stand and it hurt on the inside because of how helpless I felt. Insecurity has to be so complex like that. While I've never had to deal with it myself, I'd imagine that it's all rooted at the negativity that's thrown at them about their looks, so I think the only way you could really help is if you just did your part in proving the insults wrong. Just simply treating someone with the condition with respect, giving attention, and showing no signs of being weirded out and just treat them normally.

And to answer your question.. I think it's starting to be with the spread of social media at such an alarming rate, which contributes to a constantly changing culture. With the usual figures of great celebrities, women on magazine covers, and idols that girls look up to, they want to be just like them. Although I'm pretty sure at first they don't try to lose weight, it's the fact that there will always be the harsh and hurtful people out there that throw words around like they're toys. Careless guys call them fat and the more people that contribute to that statement, the more and more negativity goes into it. Then girls associate the word "skinny" with the word "beautiful", when that's certainly not the case at all.

Oh, and another thing that contributes to that is that back in May when I went on a field trip to a museum, there was a group of kids that looked to be in the 8-10 age range, and there were girls that were wearing short shorts. It just shows more and more that kids at younger and younger ages are trying to conform to the "acceptable" image that others want, like to gain their approval or something. ._.

Yes I aggree! media usualy gives a wrong ideal image for the female body